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PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2009 3:21 pm 
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As we look to other cancers for ways forward in the treatment of brain cancer, I have become interested in the potential of omega 3 EFA's.

First the bad news. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) in the US has done a fairly comprehensive review in 2005 and concluded that it can find no compelling evidence to use omega 3 as a treatment for cancer. It goes one step further:

"Given the large body of evidence that suggests no association between omega-3 fatty acid consumption and cancer incidence, future research in this general area is unlikely to reveal significant associations."

This appears to be fairly compelling and I'll leave you to review the paper http://www.ahrq.gov/CLINIC/epcsums/o3cansum.htm. However, I believe that there is more than meets the eye here.

I am probably one of a few amateur bodybuilders who has brain cancer. Consequently, I have an interest in all things bodybuilding that are drug free, including nutrition. To prepare for a contest we need to restrict our calories slightly below maintenance levels, drink lots of water and eat a higher than normal proportion fat - you guessed it omega 3. In one of the ironies of life, you need to eat more of the right type of fat to lose the wrong type.

So I have been trying to learn more about how much EFA's to take and their benefits. Wikipedia has a good introduction - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omega-3_fatty_acid. The first thing that struck me was the benefits to those who have mental health problems. I thought about the diagnosis and treatment and how depressed some of us become. For the first couple of weeks I cried at the drop of a hat.

As well as helping with mental health, there is also a link to normal brain health too. This one of the reasons fish is called a good brain food. In addition, omega 3 is also good for brain age related diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Since having cancer I have been accutely aware of the need to promote good brain health and most of my supplements target this area.

There can be risks if you are on warfrin or at risk of a Hemorrhagic stroke. However, the benefits far outweigh the risks for most.

I have trouble taking the oils by tablespoon so I stick to the capsules. The recommended dose is 3 grams a day plus fish 2/3 times a week. To meet my competitive goals I currently take 4 times this and believe this is ok noting the risks.

So here is another supplement to consider. It may not cure cancer, but I believe the role of supplementation is not to perform miracles or replace treatments but to promote good health :).


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2009 11:20 pm 
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I have seen this article before, but was not sure that it was relevant. My current interest in good fats and nutrition lead me to information on the KetoCal diet. A bodybuilding diet has some relevance here, high in good fats. The higher protein diet of a bodybuilder blunts the potentially negative effects of carbohydrates. There are also a different between complex and simple carbohydrates that is relevant.

The calorically restricted ketogenic diet, an effective alternative therapy for malignant brain cancer

BACKGROUND: Malignant brain cancer persists as a major disease of morbidity and mortality in adults and is the second leading cause of cancer death in children. Many current therapies for malignant brain tumors fail to provide long-term management because they ineffectively target tumor cells while negatively impacting the health and vitality of normal brain cells. In contrast to brain tumor cells, which lack metabolic flexibility and are largely dependent on glucose for growth and survival, normal brain cells can metabolize both glucose and ketone bodies for energy. This study evaluated the efficacy of KetoCal, a new nutritionally balanced high fat/low carbohydrate ketogenic diet for children with epilepsy, on the growth and vascularity of a malignant mouse astrocytoma (CT-2A) and a human malignant glioma (U87-MG).

METHODS: Adult mice were implanted orthotopically with the malignant brain tumors and KetoCal was administered to the mice in either unrestricted amounts or in restricted amounts to reduce total caloric intake according to the manufacturers recommendation for children with refractory epilepsy. The effects KetoCal on tumor growth, vascularity, and mouse survival were compared with that of an unrestricted high carbohydrate standard diet.

RESULTS: KetoCal administered in restricted amounts significantly decreased the intracerebral growth of the CT-2A and U87-MG tumors by about 65% and 35%, respectively, and significantly enhanced health and survival relative to that of the control groups receiving the standard low fat/high carbohydrate diet. The restricted KetoCal diet reduced plasma glucose levels while elevating plasma ketone body (beta-hydroxybutyrate) levels. Tumor microvessel density was less in the calorically restricted KetoCal groups than in the calorically unrestricted control groups. Moreover, gene expression for the mitochondrial enzymes, beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA: 3-ketoacid CoA transferase, was lower in the tumors than in the contralateral normal brain suggesting that these brain tumors have reduced ability to metabolize ketone bodies for energy.

CONCLUSION: The results indicate that KetoCal has anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic effects in experimental mouse and human brain tumors when administered in restricted amounts. The therapeutic effect of KetoCal for brain cancer management was due largely to the reduction of total caloric content, which reduces circulating glucose required for rapid tumor growth. A dependency on glucose for energy together with defects in ketone body metabolism largely account for why the brain tumors grow minimally on either a ketogenic-restricted diet or on a standard-restricted diet. Genes for ketone body metabolism should be useful for screening brain tumors that could be targeted with calorically restricted high fat/low carbohydrate ketogenic diets. This preclinical study indicates that restricted KetoCal is a safe and effective diet therapy and should be considered as an alternative therapeutic option for malignant brain cancer.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17313687


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 17, 2009 10:56 pm 
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Omega-3 Fatty Acids Reduce Risk Of Advanced Prostate Cancer

ScienceDaily (Mar. 25, 2009) — Omega-3 fatty acids appear protective against advanced prostate cancer, and this effect may be modified by a genetic variant in the COX-2 gene, according to a report in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

"Previous research has shown protection against prostate cancer, but this is one of the first studies to show protection against advanced prostate cancer and interaction with COX-2," said John S. Witte, Ph.D., professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of California San Francisco.

For the current study, researchers performed a case-control analysis of 466 men diagnosed with aggressive prostate cancer and 478 healthy men. Diet was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire and researchers genotyped nine COX-2 single nucleotide polymorphisms.

Researchers divided omega-3 fatty acid intake into four groups based on quartiles of intake. Men who consumed the highest amount of long chain omega-3 fatty acids had a 63 percent reduced risk of aggressive prostate cancer compared to men with the lowest amount of long chain omega-3 fatty acids.

The researchers then assessed the effect of omega-3 fatty acid among men with the variant rs4647310 in COX-2, a known inflammatory gene. Men with low long chain omega-3 fatty acid intake and this variant had a more than five-fold increased risk of advanced prostate cancer. But men with high intake of omega-3 fatty acids had a substantially reduced risk, even if they carried the COX-2 variant.

"The COX-2 increased risk of disease was essentially reversed by increasing omega-3 fatty acid intake by a half a gram per day," said Witte. "If you want to think of the overall inverse association in terms of fish, where omega-3 fatty acids are commonly derived, the strongest effect was seen from eating dark fish such as salmon one or more times per week."

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090324131444.htm


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 17, 2010 9:17 am 
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High-Fat Ketogenic Diet to Control Seizures Is Safe Over Long Term, Study Suggests

ScienceDaily (Feb. 16, 2010) — Current and former patients treated with the high-fat ketogenic diet to control multiple, daily and severe seizures can be reassured by the news that not only is the diet effective, but it also appears to have no long-lasting side effects, say scientists at Johns Hopkins Children's Center.

A study report supporting their conclusion, and believed to be one of the first analyses of the long-term safety and efficacy of the diet, appears online in the February edition of the journal Epilepsia.

The ketogenic diet, consisting of high-fat foods and very few carbohydrates, is believed to trigger biochemical changes that eliminate seizure-causing short circuits in the brain's signaling system. Used as first-line therapy for infantile spasms and in children whose seizures cannot be controlled with drugs, the diet is highly effective but complicated and sometimes difficult to maintain. It can temporarily raise cholesterol, impair growth and, in rare cases, lead to kidney stones, among other side effects.

"Despite its temporary side effects, we have always suspected that the ketogenic diet is relatively safe long term, and we now have proof," says senior investigator Eric Kossoff, M.D., a pediatric neurologist and director of the ketogenic diet program at Hopkins Children's. "Our study should help put to rest some of the nagging doubts about the long-term safety of the ketogenic diet," he adds.

The evidence is based on a study of 101 patients ages 2 to 26 years treated with the ketogenic diet for a minimum of 16 months and for up to eight years at Hopkins Children's between 1993 and 2008. At the time of the follow-up, patients were off the diet anywhere between eight months and 14 years. Nearly 80 percent of the patients remained either seizure-free or had their seizures reduced by half. Most patients' seizures did not worsen even years after stopping the diet.

Researchers caution it is possible that some effects may not show up for decades. However, the evidence, especially among patients who were off the diet for more than 10 years, suggests no long-term harm.

During interviews, none of the patients reported adverse cardiovascular side effects such as heart attacks, enlargement of the heart or abnormal plaque buildup in their arteries. One patient reported having high blood pressure.

Only two of the 101 patients reported kidney stones after stopping the diet, the same rate found in the general population not treated with the ketogenic diet, the researchers say.

None of the 25 patients who had liver and kidney function tests had abnormal results. Among the 26 patients who had their cholesterol tested, the average level was 157 milligrams per deciliter of blood (less than 200 is considered normal), with three of the 26 having abnormal levels. Most patients' cholesterol levels go up while on the diet, but are believed to return to normal thereafter. The Hopkins study now confirms that this is the case.

Most patients older than 18 at the time of the study had normal body mass index of 22 on average (25 and below is considered normal). And most of them were within a few inches of their expected heights, based on their parents' heights. Patients 18 years and younger at the time of the study were, on average, in the 25th percentile for height and in the 36th percentile for weight for their age. While this is below average, the investigators say, it is also much higher than the usual 5th-to-10th percentile while on the diet.

"We have every reason to believe that most children will start catching up once they are off the diet as they grow up because this is what we see in older former patients," Kossoff says.

Contrary to the fear of many parents, the diet does not appear to alter patients' food preferences, the researchers say. Only 8 percent of those in the study said they continued to eat predominantly high-fat foods.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 163531.htm


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 17, 2010 9:30 am 
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Good Fats & Seizures

To me this raises the question about whether good fats could have a role in seizure control. For those of us still on antiseizure medication, it raises the question about whether there is a role for diet in the seizure control in adults.

Specifically I would like to know whether this could reduce the need or even eliminate their use, for up to 33% of us, to be on antiseizure drugs. Once you have a seizure they are happy to leave you on these drugs for life. Is that a good thing?

I have already increased my dietary intake of fats to 30%. Not sure that I would want to increase this to 90%! With my training I have an increased need for protein. Nor are all carbohydrates equal. I have increased my veges and eliminated all simple carbohydrates.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 17, 2010 9:35 am 
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Modified Atkins Diet Can Cut Epileptic Seizures In Adults

ScienceDaily (Jan. 28, 2008) — A modified version of a popular high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet can significantly cut the number of seizures in adults with epilepsy, a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers suggests. The Atkins-like diet, which has shown promise for seizure control in children, may offer a new lifeline for patients when drugs and other treatments fail or cause complications.

For almost a century, doctors have prescribed an eating plan called the ketogenic diet to treat children with epilepsy. This diet often consists of a short period of fasting, strictly limits fluids and drastically restricts carbohydrates. It appears to limit or even eliminate seizures, possibly by generating the build-up of ketones, compounds the body produces when it derives calories mostly from fat. Some of the largest studies to scientifically test this diet's efficacy took place at Johns Hopkins in the mid-1990s, led by pediatric neurologists John Freeman, M.D., and Eileen Vining, M.D.

Why exactly the ketogenic diet works remains unknown, and it is notoriously difficult to follow, relying almost solely on fat and protein for calories. Consequently, doctors typically recommend it only for children, whose parents can strictly monitor their eating habits. The ketogenic diet is almost never prescribed to adults, who generally make their own food choices and often have difficulty complying with the diet's strict guidelines.

In 2002, Johns Hopkins researchers began testing a modified version of the Atkins diet in children with epilepsy. The modified diet shares the high-fat focus of the ketogenic diet, prompting the body to generate ketones. However, it allows more carbohydrates and protein, doesn't limit fluids and calories, and has no fasting period. When studies showed that the new diet prevented or curtailed seizures in children, the researchers began testing it for efficacy and ease of use in adults.

Reporting on the results in the February issue of Epilepsia, Eric H. Kossoff, M.D., an assistant professor of neurology and pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said 30 adults with epilepsy, ages 18 to 53 years, who had tried at least two anticonvulsant drugs without success and had an average of 10 seizures per week, were placed on the modified Atkins diet. All patients were seen for free in the Johns Hopkins General Clinical Research Center.

The regimen restricted them to 15 grams of carbohydrates a day. "That's a few strawberries, some vegetables, or a bit of bread," says Kossoff. The diet offers most of its calories from fat-eggs, meats, oils and heavy cream-with as much protein and no-carb beverages as patients want.

Each day, patients kept diaries of what they ate and how many seizures they had. The researchers evaluated how each patient was doing at one, three and six months after starting the diet.

Results showed that about half the patients had experienced a 50 percent reduction in the frequency of their seizures by the first clinic visit. About a third of the patients halved the frequency of seizures by three months. Side effects linked with the diet, such as a rise in cholesterol or triglycerides, were mild. A third of the patients dropped out by the third month, unable to comply with the restrictions.

Fourteen patients who stuck with the diet until the six-month mark chose to continue, even after the study ended-a testament to how effective the diet worked to treat their epilepsy, Kossoff notes.

Though the modified Atkins diet won't be a good fit for all patients, says Kossoff, "it opens up another therapeutic option for adults trying to decide between medication, surgery and electrical stimulation to treat intractable seizures." A second study to examine the diet's effects on adults with intractable seizures is under way.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 113325.htm


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 17, 2010 9:41 am 
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Medical Advice

Needless to say that it would not to be wise to do this without medical supervision. I would lose my drivers license for six months if I have another seizure, so I'm not planning to rush out and reduce my antiseizure medication. Definitely an area for futher investigation and a possible way for some of us to become drug free :).


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 26, 2010 11:52 am 
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Omega-3s linked to longevity

(NaturalNews) Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, have found that omega-3 fatty acids have another beneficial effect besides maintaining a healthy heart. Published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the study found that patients with high levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their blood experienced a slowing of the shortening of their telomeres, indicating that the fatty acids help to slow the aging process.

The study of telomeres and their role in the aging process has been a popular subject in recent years. Scientists have found that telomeres, which act as protective end caps on cells, gradually shorten over time as cells divide and repair themselves, causing a person to age. Researchers, however, have been studying various compounds, including omega-3s, that appear to slow the shortening process and even reverse it.

Ramin Farzaneh-Far, a clinical cardiologist and lead author of the study, evaluated 608 patients who had prior heart problems and coronary-artery blockage. Over a five-year period, those with the highest levels of omega-3s in their blood experienced far less telomere shortening than those with the lowest levels.

The researchers focused primarily on omega-3s derived from fish sources rather than from vegetable sources like flaxseed and walnuts. The study also did not address the specific sources of omega-3s, whether they be directly from fish or vegetables or from omega-3 supplements.

John LaPuma, a physician and nutrition expert from Santa Barbara, California, believes that omega-3s derived directly from eating fish is the best source. He bases this assumption on the brevity of research that has been conducted directly on fish sources of omega-3s but it seems reasonable to assume that omega-3s derived from other sources provide similar benefits as did the ones used in the study.

Study researchers said they are not entirely sure how telomeres work in the aging process but they recognize that they play a key role in the process. Others have compared telomeres to the plastic end caps on shoelaces that keep them from unraveling, indicating that they maintain the integrity of cells.

Dr. Farzaneh-Far also explained that short telomeres often predict the onset of certain diseases including cardiovascular illness and heart problems. Whether or not telomeres are merely indicators of these diseases or the cause of them is still up for debate. Further research into the process is needed in order to get a more accurate understanding of the way telomeres work in cellular aging.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028439_omega ... evity.html


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2010 9:29 am 
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Omega 3 Fatty Acids Influence Mood, Impulsivity And Personality, Study Indicates

ScienceDaily (Mar. 4, 2006) — Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may influence mood, personality and behavior, according to results of a study presented today by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers at the 64th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Psychosomatic Society in Denver.

In a study of 106 healthy volunteers, researchers found that participants who had lower blood levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids were more likely to report mild or moderate symptoms of depression, a more negative outlook and be more impulsive. Conversely, those with higher blood levels of omega-3s were found to be more agreeable.

"A number of previous studies have linked low levels of omega-3 to clinically significant conditions such as major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, substance abuse and attention deficit disorder," said Sarah Conklin, Ph.D., a postdoctoral scholar with the Cardiovascular Behavioral Medicine Program in the department of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. "However, few studies have shown that these relationships also occur in healthy adults. This study opens the door for future research looking at what effect increasing omega-3 intake, whether by eating omega-3 rich foods like salmon, or taking fish-oil supplements, has on people's mood."

The American Heart Association recommends that all Americans consume fish, which is high in omega-3 fatty acids, twice per week. This recommendation is based upon evidence that a diet high in fish s associated with improved heart health and reduced risk for heart-related problems. While the cardiovascular benefit of increasing omega-3 intake is well recognized, relatively little is known of the potential mental health effects among the general public.

Comparisons were made by analyzing levels of omega-3 fatty acids in participants' blood and comparing that data to the participants' scores on three accepted tests for depression, impulsiveness and personality. The amount of omega-3 circulating in blood reflects dietary intake of the fatty acid. The study did not require participants to make changes in their normal diet habits.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 205050.htm


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2010 9:36 am 
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Omega-3 fatty acid

n−3 fatty acids (popularly referred to as ω−3 fatty acids or omega-3 fatty acids) are a family of unsaturated fatty acids that have in common a final carbon–carbon double bond in the n−3 position; that is, the third bond from the methyl end of the fatty acid.

Nutritionally important n−3 fatty acids include α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), all of which are polyunsaturated. The human body cannot synthesize n−3 fatty acids de novo, but it can form "long chain" 20-carbon unsaturated n−3 fatty acids (like EPA) and 22-carbon unsaturated n−3 fatty acids (like DHA) from the "short chain" eighteen-carbon n−3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid. The short chain n−3 fatty acids are converted to long chain forms (EPA, DHA) with an efficiency of approximately 5%[1][2] in men, and at a greater percentage in women.[3] These conversions occur competitively with n−6 fatty acids, which are essential closely related chemical analogues that are derived from linoleic acid. Both the n−3 α-linolenic acid and n−6 linoleic acid are essential nutrients which must be obtained from food. Synthesis of the longer n−3 fatty acids from linolenic acid within the body is competitively slowed by the n−6 analogues. Thus accumulation of long-chain n−3 fatty acids in tissues is more effective when they are obtained directly from food or when competing amounts of n−6 analogs do not greatly exceed the amounts of n−3.[citation needed]

History

Although omega-3 fatty acids have been known as essential to normal growth and health since the 1930s, awareness of their health benefits has dramatically increased in the past few years.[4] New versions of ethyl esterized omega-3 fatty acids, such as E-EPA and combinations of E-EPA and E-DHA, have drawn attention as highly purified and more effective products than the traditional ones. In the United States, these novel versions are often sold as prescription medications, such as Lovaza. In the European Union, they are available as dietary supplements.

The health benefits of the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids — DHA and EPA omega-3 — are the best known. These benefits were discovered in the 1970s by researchers studying the Greenland Inuit Tribe. The Greenland Inuit people consumed large amounts of fat from seafood, but displayed virtually no cardiovascular disease. The high level of omega-3 fatty acids consumed by the Eskimos reduced triglycerides, heart rate, blood pressure, and atherosclerosis.[citation needed]

On September 8, 2004, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave "qualified health claim" status to EPA and DHA n−3 fatty acids, stating that "supportive but not conclusive research shows that consumption of EPA and DHA [n−3] fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease."[5] This updated and modified their health risk advice letter of 2001 (see below). Currently, regulatory agencies do not accept that there is sufficient evidence for any of the other suggested benefits of DHA and EPA other than for cardiovascular health, and further claims should be treated with caution.

The Canadian Government has recognized the importance of DHA omega-3 and permits the following biological role claim for DHA: "DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid, supports the normal development of the brain, eyes and nerves." [6]

Biological significance

The biological effects of the n−3 are largely mediated by their interactions with the n−6 fatty acids; see Essential fatty acid interactions for detail.
A 1992 article by biochemist William E.M. Lands[7] provides an overview of the research into n−3 fatty acids, and is the basis of this section.

The 'essential' fatty acids were given their name when researchers found that they were essential to normal growth in young children and animals. (Note that the modern definition of 'essential' is more strict.) A small amount of n−3 in the diet (~1% of total calories) enabled normal growth, and increasing the amount had little to no additional effect on growth.

Likewise, researchers found that n−6 fatty acids (such as γ-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid) play a similar role in normal growth. However, they also found that n−6 was "better" at supporting dermal integrity, renal function, and parturition. These preliminary findings led researchers to concentrate their studies on n−6, and it was only in recent decades that n−3 has become of interest.

In 1963 it was discovered that the n−6 arachidonic acid was converted by the body into pro-inflammatory agents called prostaglandins. By 1979 more of what are now known as eicosanoids were discovered: thromboxanes, prostacyclins and the leukotrienes. The eicosanoids, which have important biological functions, typically have a short active lifetime in the body, starting with synthesis from fatty acids and ending with metabolism by enzymes. However, if the rate of synthesis exceeds the rate of metabolism, the excess eicosanoids may have deleterious effects. Researchers found that n−3 is also converted into eicosanoids, but at a much slower rate. Eicosanoids made from n−3 fats are often referred to as anti-inflammatory, but in fact they are just less pro-inflammatory than those made from n−6 fats. If both n−3 and n−6 are present, they will "compete" to be transformed, so the ratio of n−3:n−6 directly affects the type of eicosanoids that are produced.

This competition was recognized as important when it was found that thromboxane is a factor in the clumping of platelets, which leads to thrombosis. The leukotrienes were similarly found to be important in immune/inflammatory-system response, and therefore relevant to arthritis, lupus, and asthma. These discoveries led to greater interest in finding ways to control the synthesis of n−6 eicosanoids. The simplest way would be by consuming more n−3 and fewer n−6 fatty acids.

In 1982 Dr. Charles Serhan's group at Harvard discovered that the omega-3 fatty acid EPA forms in the body potent antiinflamatory nanomolecules, called resolvins. Later another team found that omega-3s also turn into other antiinflammatory molecules called omega-3-oxylipins, which partly explain the versatile health effects of fish oil.[8]

Health benefits

The 18 carbon α-linolenic acid has not been shown to have the same cardiovascular benefits as DHA or EPA.[9] Currently there are many products on the market which claim to contain health promoting 'omega 3', but contain only α-linolenic acid (ALA), not EPA or DHA. These products contain mainly higher plant oils and must be converted by the body to create DHA and therefore considered less efficient. DHA and EPA are made by microalgae that live in seawater. These are then consumed by fish and accumulate to high levels in their internal organs. If a person has ethical concerns about killing fish, or is concerned about mercury and oceanborne contaminants in fish, DHA can be produced directly from microalgae as a vegetarian source. People with certain circulatory problems, such as varicose veins, benefit from such supplements containing EPA and DHA which stimulate blood circulation, increase the breakdown of fibrin, a compound involved in clot and scar formation, and additionally have been shown to reduce blood pressure.[10][11] There is strong scientific evidence that n−3 fatty acids reduce blood triglyceride levels[12][13][14][15] and regular intake reduces the risk of secondary and primary heart attack.[16][17][18][19]

Some benefits have been reported in conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis[20][21] and cardiac arrhythmias.[22][23][24]

There is preliminary evidence that n-3 fatty acids supplementation might be helpful in cases of depression[25][26] and anxiety.[27][28] Studies report highly significant improvement from n-3 fatty acids supplementation alone and in conjunction with medication.[29] The New York Times reports that at least one study, however, has found no connection between depression in heart patients and supplements containing n-3 fatty acids.[30]

Some research suggests that fish oil intake may reduce the risk of ischemic and thrombotic stroke.[31][32][33] However, very large amounts may actually increase the risk of hemorrhagic stroke (see below). Lower amounts are not related to this risk,[33] 3 grams of total EPA/DHA daily are considered safe with no increased risk of bleeding involved[34] and many studies used substantially higher doses without major side effects (for example: 4.4 grams EPA/2.2 grams DHA in 2003 study).[25]There is evidence that the botanical sources of n−3 do not result in the health benefits derived from wild fish sources.[35]

Cancer prevention

Several studies report possible anti-cancer effects of n−3 fatty acids (particularly breast, colon and prostate cancer).[36][37][38] Omega-3 fatty acids reduced prostate tumor growth, slowed histopathological progression, and increased survival[39]. Among n-3 fatty acids [omega-3], neither long-chain nor short-chain forms were consistently associated with breast cancer risk. High levels of docosahexaenoic acid, however, the most abundant n-3 PUFA [omega-3] in erythrocyte membranes, were associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer.[40] A 2006 report in the Journal of the American Medical Association concluded that their review of literature covering cohorts from many countries with a wide variety of demographic concluded that there was no link between n−3 fatty acids and cancer.[41] This is similar to the findings of a review by the British Medical Journal of studies up to February 2002 that failed to find clear effects of long and shorter chain n−3 fats on total mortality, combined cardiovascular events and cancer.[42]

A 2007 systematic review of n-3 fatty acids and cachexia found evidence that oral n-3 fatty acid supplements benefit cancer patients, improving appetite, weight and quality of life.[43] A 2009 trial found that a supplement of eicosapentaenoic acid helped cancer patients retain muscle mass.[44]

Cardiovascular disease prevention

In 1999, the GISSI-Prevenzione Investigators reported in the Lancet, the results of major clinical study in 11,324 patients with a recent myocardial infarction. Treatment 1 gram per day of n−3 fatty acids reduced the occurrence of death, cardiovascular death and sudden cardiac death by 20%, 30% and 45% respectively.[45] These beneficial effects were seen already from three months onwards.[46]

In April 2006, a team led by Lee Hooper at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, UK, published a review of almost 100 separate studies into n−3 fatty acids, found in abundance in oily fish. It concluded that they do not have a significant protective effect against cardiovascular disease.[47] This meta-analysis was controversial and stands in stark contrast with two different reviews also performed in 2006 by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition[48] and a second JAMA review[49] that both indicated decreases in total mortality and cardiovascular incidents (i.e. myocardial infarctions) associated with the regular consumption of fish and fish oil supplements.

Several studies published in 2007 have been more positive. In the March 2007 edition of the journal Atherosclerosis, 81 Japanese men with unhealthy blood sugar levels were randomly assigned to receive 1800 mg daily of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA — an n−3 essential fatty acid from fish oil) with the other half being a control group. The thickness of the carotid arteries and certain measures of blood flow were measured before and after supplementation. This went on for approximately two years. A total of 60 patients (30 in the E-EPA group and 30 in the control group) completed the study. Those given the EPA had a statistically significant decrease in the thickness of the carotid arteries along with improvement in blood flow. The authors indicated that this was the first demonstration that administration of purified EPA improves the thickness of carotid arteries along with improving blood flow in patients with unhealthy blood sugar levels.[50]

In another study published in the American Journal of Health System Pharmacy March 2007, patients with high triglycerides and poor coronary artery health were given 4 grams a day of a combination of EPA and DHA along with some monounsaturated fatty acids. Those patients with very unhealthy triglyceride levels (above 500 mg/dl) reduced their triglycerides on average 45% and their VLDL cholesterol by more than 50%. VLDL is a bad type of cholesterol and elevated triglycerides can also be deleterious for cardiovascular health.[51]

Another study on the benefits of EPA was published in The Lancet in March 2007. This study involved over 18,000 patients with unhealthy cholesterol levels. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either 1,800 mg a day of E-EPA with a statin drug or a statin drug alone. The trial went on for a total of five years. It was found at the end of the study those patients in the E-EPA group had superior cardiovascular function. Non-fatal coronary events were also significantly reduced in the E-EPA group. The authors concluded that EPA is a promising treatment for prevention of major coronary events, especially non-fatal coronary events.[52]

Similar to those who follow a Mediterranean diet, Arctic-dwelling Inuit - who consume high amounts of n−3 fatty acids from fatty fish - also tend to have higher proportions of n−3, increased HDL cholesterol and decreased triglycerides (fatty material that circulates in the blood) and less heart disease. Eating walnuts (the ratio of n−3 to n−6 is circa 1:4 respectively[53]) was reported to lower total cholesterol by 4% relative to controls when people also ate 27% less cholesterol.[54]

A study carried out involving 465 women showed serum levels of eicosapentaenoic acid is inversely related to the levels of anti-oxidized-LDL antibodies. Oxidative modification of LDL is thought to play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis.[55]

Immune function

Another study regarding fish oil was published in the Journal of Nutrition in April 2007. Sixty four healthy Danish infants from nine to twelve months of age received either cow's milk or infant formula alone or with fish oil. It was found that those infants supplemented with fish oil had improvement in immune function maturation with no apparent reduction in immune activation.[56]

Brain health

Fish oil may help prevent psychotic disorders in high-risk children and adolescents. [57] A novel fish oil known as E-EPA may prevent memory impairment[58] and speed up recovery from major depression[59] There was yet another study on n−3 fatty acids published in the April 2007 Journal of Neuroscience. A group of mice were genetically modified to develop accumulation of amyloid and tau proteins in the brain similar to that seen in people with poor memory. The mice were divided into four groups with one group receiving a typical American diet (with high ratio of n−6 to n−3 fatty acids being 10 to 1). The other three groups were given food with a balanced 1 to 1 n−6 to n−3 ratio and two additional groups supplemented with DHA plus long chain n−6 fatty acids. After three months of feeding, all the DHA supplemented groups were noted to have a lower accumulation of beta amyloid and tau protein. Some research suggests that these abnormal proteins may contribute to the development of memory loss in later years.[60]

There is also a study published regarding n−3 supplementation in children with learning and behavioral problems. This study was published in the April 2007 edition of the Journal of the Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (5), where 132 children, between the ages of seven to twelve years old, with poor learning, participated in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded interventional trial. A total of 104 children completed the trial. For the first fifteen weeks of this study, the children were given polyunsaturated fatty acids (n−3 and n−6, 3000 mg a day), polyunsaturated fatty acids plus multi-vitamins and minerals or placebo. After fifteen weeks, all groups crossed over to the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) plus vitamins and mineral supplement. Parents were asked to rate their children's condition after fifteen and thirty weeks. After thirty weeks, parental ratings of behavior improved significantly in nine out of fourteen scales. The lead author of the study, Dr. Sinn, indicated the present study is the largest PUFA trial to date with children falling in the poor learning and focus range. The results support those of other studies that have found improvement in poor developmental health with essential fatty acid supplementation.[51][52][56][60][61][62]

A study[63] examining whether omega-3 exerts neuroprotective action in Parkinson's disease found that it did, using an experimental model, exhibit a protective effect (much like it did for Alzheimer's disease as well). The scientists exposed mice to either a control or a high omega-3 diet from two to twelve months of age and then treated them with a neurotoxin commonly used as an experimental model for Parkinson's. The scientists found that high doses of omega-3 given to the experimental group completely prevented the neurotoxin-induced decrease of dopamine that ordinarily occurs. Since Parkinson's is a disease caused by disruption of the dopamine system, this protective effect exhibited could show promise for future research in the prevention of Parkinson's disease.

However, fish oil has been shown to have no effect on cognitive performance in older individuals without dementia.[64]

Rheumatoid arthritis

Research in 2005 and 2006 has suggested that the in-vitro anti-inflammatory activity of n−3 acids translates into clinical benefits. Cohorts of neck pain patients and of rheumatoid arthritis sufferers have demonstrated benefits comparable to those receiving standard NSAIDs.[citation needed] Those who follow a Mediterranean-style diet tend to have less heart disease, higher HDL ("good") cholesterol levels[65] and higher proportions of n−3 in tissue highly unsaturated fatty acids.[66]

Health risks

In a letter published October 31, 2000,[67] the United States Food and Drug Administration Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Office of Nutritional Products, Labeling, and Dietary Supplements noted that known or suspected risks of EPA and DHA n−3 fatty acids may include the possibility of:

Increased bleeding if overused (normally over 3 grams per day) by a patient who is also taking aspirin or warfarin. However, this is disputed.[68]
Hemorrhagic stroke (only in case of very large doses).[69]
Reduced glycemic control among diabetics in the FDA 1991-1993 Scientific Review.[67]
Subsequent advice from the FDA and national counterparts have permitted health claims associated with heart health.

Cardiac risk

Persons with congestive heart failure, chronic recurrent angina pectoris or evidence that their heart is receiving insufficient blood flow are advised to talk to their doctor before taking n−3 fatty acids. There have been concerns if such persons take n−3 fatty acids or eating foods that contain them in substantial amounts.[70] In a recent large study, n−3 fatty acids on top of standard heart failure therapy produced a small but statistically significant benefit in terms of mortality and hospitalization.[71]

In congestive heart failure, cells that are only barely receiving enough blood flow become electrically hyperexcitable. This, in turn, can lead to increased risk of irregular heartbeats, which, in turn, can cause sudden cardiac death. n−3 fatty acids seem to stabilize the rhythm of the heart by effectively preventing these hyperexcitable cells from functioning, thereby reducing the likelihood of irregular heartbeats and sudden cardiac death. For most people, this is obviously beneficial and would account for most of the large reduction in the likelihood of sudden cardiac death. Nevertheless, for people with congestive heart failure, the heart is barely pumping blood well enough to keep them alive. In these patients, n−3 fatty acids may eliminate enough of these few pumping cells that the heart would no longer be able to pump sufficient blood to live, causing an increased risk of cardiac death.[70]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omega-3_fatty_acid


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PostPosted: Tue May 18, 2010 6:00 pm 
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High-Fat Ketogenic Diet Effectively Treats Persistent Childhood Seizures, Study Finds

ScienceDaily (May 17, 2010) — The high-fat ketogenic diet can dramatically reduce or completely eliminate debilitating seizures in most children with infantile spasms, whose seizures persist despite medication, according to a Johns Hopkins Children's Center study published online April 30 in the journal Epilepsia.

Infantile spasms, also called West syndrome, is a stubborn form of epilepsy that often does not get better with antiseizure drugs. Because poorly controlled infantile spasms may cause brain damage, the Hopkins team's findings suggest the diet should be started at the earliest sign that medications aren't working.

"Stopping or reducing the number of seizures can go a long way toward preserving neurological function, and the ketogenic diet should be our immediate next line of defense in children with persistent infantile spasms who don't improve with medication," says senior investigator Eric Kossoff, M.D., a pediatric neurologist and director of the ketogenic diet program at Hopkins Children's.

The ketogenic diet, made up of high-fat foods and few carbohydrates, works by triggering biochemical changes that eliminate seizure-causing short circuits in the brain's signaling system. It has been used successfully in several forms of epilepsy.

A small 2002 study by the same Hopkins team showed the diet worked well in a handful of children with infantile spasms. The new study is the largest analysis thus far showing just how effective the diet can be in children with this condition.

Of the 104 children treated by the Hopkins team, nearly 40 percent, or 38 children, became seizure-free for at least six months after being on the diet for anywhere from just a few days to 20 months. Of the 38, 30 have remained so without a relapse for at least two years.

After three months on the diet, one-third of the children had 90 percent fewer seizures, and after nine months on the diet, nearly half of the children in the study had 90 percent fewer seizures. Nearly two-thirds had half as many seizures after six months on the diet.

Nearly two-thirds of the children experienced improvement in their neurological and cognitive development, and nearly 30 percent were weaned off antiseizure medications after starting the diet.

Most of the children continued taking their medication even after starting the diet, the researchers say, because the two are not mutually exclusive and can often work in synergy.

Researchers also used the diet as first-line therapy in18 newly diagnosed infants never treated with drugs, 10 of whom became seizure free within two weeks of starting the diet. The finding suggests that, at least in some children, the diet may work well as first-line therapy, but the researchers say they need further and larger studies to help them identify patients for whom the diet is best used before medications. Hopkins Children's neurologists are actively using the ketogenic diet as first-line treatment in children with infantile spasms with promising results.

Side effects, including constipation, heartburn, diarrhea and temporary spikes in cholesterol levels, occurred in one-third of the children, with six percent of them experiencing diminished growth.

Despite these side effects, a recent study by Kossoff and his team showed that the ketogenic diet is safe long term.

Conflict of interest disclosure: Dr. Kossoff has received grant support from Nutricia Inc., for unrelated research. The terms of these arrangements are being managed by the Johns Hopkins University in accordance with its conflict-of-interest policies.

The research was funded in part by the National Institutes of Health.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 161221.htm


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PostPosted: Tue May 18, 2010 7:37 pm 
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Clear up the Misconceptions about Omega 6 fatty acids

(NaturalNews) Popular opinion says that we need more omega 3, and that too much omega 6 and too little omega 3 will cause cancer and inflammation. Omega 6 fats have been so vilified and misunderstood in the health community that they have become the new saturated fat or cholesterol.

Most of us are getting too much omega 6. However, there is no insight in that statement because most of the omega 6 in our diets is highly processed and therefore, poisonous. We must avoid ALL supermarket oils and add in COLD PROCESSED, ORGANIC OMEGA 6 RICH OILS. Omega 6 fatty acids, or linoleic acid, are essential to health. The body cannot make them, so they must be replenished in the diet regularly.
Oils rich in omega 6 include:

- pumpkin seed oil
- sunflower oil
- safflower oil
- evening primrose oil
- borage oil
- hemp seed oil

Super-market vegetable oils, the major source of omega 6 for people, are extremely dangerous. The omega 6 in these oils are completely ruined by processing and offer no benefits.

So why are functional omega 6 fatty acids so critical? They have structural, protective, and regulatory roles in the entire body. The body is composed of over 100 trillion cells, a large chunk of which is functional omega 6 fatty acids.

Omega 6 fats also break down into hormone-like compounds called prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are made as needed and have extremely important regulatory functions in the body. Gamma linolenic acid, which is an omega-6 derivative, is a precursor to the series 1 prostaglandins. PGE1, a series 1 prostaglandin, is an extremely potent anti-inflammatory! Only the functional omega 6 from organic, cold pressed sources can perform this function.

Omega 6 also produces arachidonic acid, which gives rise to the series 2 prostaglandins. PGI2, a series 2 prostaglandin, prevents blood platelets from sticking together, as good as and safer than blood thinning pharmaceuticals! Arachidonic acid can also be found in animal products, like grass-fed meats.

Functional omega 6 fatty acids from organic sources are vital for optimal health. It is the primary fat transported by cholesterol in the body and the predominant fat in the phospholipid by-layer of cell membranes. What is more, cholesterol and omega 6 are the primary lipids found in the skin. Therefore, adequate, functional omega 6 intake will soften and strengthen skin.

Omega 6 fatty acids benefit the cardiovascular system, integumentary system, cell structure, brain and eye health and musculoskeletal system and offer protection to the gastrointestinal tract. Synthetic prostaglandins manufactured by pharmaceutical companies cost hundreds of dollars. However, eliminating the bad vegetable oils (which we are all consuming) and increasing functional omega 6 from organic, cold-pressed oils will ensure you are getting maximal benefits.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028806_omega ... acids.html


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 14, 2010 12:03 pm 
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Inflammation Is Associated With Lower Intelligence and Premature Death

ScienceDaily (Sep. 12, 2010) — Inflammation is associated with lower intelligence and premature death, according to Swedish scientists from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. "Those with low-grade inflammation performed more poorly on standardised intelligence tests, even after excluding those with signs of current illness. Inflammation also predicted an increased risk of premature death," said lead researcher Dr Hakan Karlsson.

The research, recently published in Brain, Behavior and Immunity, used large population-based registers containing data collected over several decades. Inflammation and intelligence were measured at 18-20 years of age in nearly 50,000 young men, and deaths over the following 35 years were recorded.

"Although we knew that inflammation associated with infection or cardiovascular disease could impair brain function, this is the first time that similar associations have been shown in healthy young people," said Dr Karlsson. "This suggests that even low levels of inflammation can have detrimental consequences for health and brain function," he added.

"Since low-grade inflammation appears to be hazardous, it is also important to determine its causes," affirmed Dr Karlsson. "One interesting possibility is the role of environmental factors during childhood," he added. In the current study, childhood socio-economic status predicted the level of inflammation seen in young adulthood. For example, children of farmers had higher levels of inflammation than those whose fathers were non-manual workers. "It's possible that these boys were exposed to more toxins, allergens or infectious agents in childhood, leading to greater inflammation and its negative effects later in life," he remarked.

"This is an important finding because it is the largest study to date to show that low-grade inflammation in young adulthood is associated with intelligence and mortality," said Dr Michelle Luciano, from the Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology at the University of Edinburgh. "An interesting question now is whether the effects of a less healthy childhood environment on inflammation persist into middle age and beyond," she commented.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 163459.htm

[comment - inflammation is a key mechanism for the spread of cancer, once it has established its blood supply. The best defence against inflammation is omega 3 fats]


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 22, 2010 3:02 pm 
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News coverage about a flawed omega-3 study reveals truth about media's inaccurate health reporting

(NaturalNews) Scientists have conducted numerous studies (http://www.naturalnews.com/omega-3.html) over the past decade showing the remarkable health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids -- the kind of "good" fat found in cold water fish like salmon and some plant foods such as walnuts. Recently, Dutch researchers published a study in the New England Journal of Medicine which involved adding a small amount of marine source omega-3s to the diets of heart patients. Instead of actually reporting the details of this study and placing the findings in the context of previous scientific research, the mainstream media went, predictably, for the easy headline.

The result? Widespread inaccurate and even downright misleading headlines and sloppy reporting that hinted -- and even sometimes declared -- the Dutch study was proof omega-3s aren't so great for the heart after all.

For example, Time magazine blared: "Omega-3 May Reduce Heart Risks Less Than Thought". Another case in point: "Omega-3 Fats No Magic Answer to Heart Problems" declared U.S. News and World Report. The latter article also started off with the highly questionable statement that "Omega-3 fatty acids might not be as potent a weapon against heart disease as some research has shown, a new study suggests."

So what exactly was wrong with this coverage? It distorted the specific facts of a scientific study -- which is not only bad journalism but denies the public accurate information about medical research.

First of all, the new study does not conclude, nor prove, that "omega-3s may reduce heart risks less than thought". Instead, it shows only that a low dose of omega-3s failed to offer any additional cardiovascular protection to a very specific group of people -- those diagnosed with heart disease who had already suffered from heart attacks and who were all taking an "optimal", i.e. multi, regimen of all kinds of prescription drugs (for cholesterol, hypertension, and to prevent blood clots). The new study, as the majority of mainstream media failed to even mention, did nothing to refute previously clinically substantiated findings that omega-3s (in high enough doses) overall reduce the risk of second heart attacks as well as the risk of sudden death.

In fact, the Dutch researchers behind the new study admitted -- if reporters bothered to actually read the research thoroughly -- that one obvious explanation for their findings was that the omega-3s simply didn't do anything to override or change the combined power of all the cardiac drugs the nearly 5,000 heart patients in the study were taking.

A similar German study last year came up with the same results. And, just like the Dutch research, the German scientists' conclusions in no way negate the long-term health protective value of omega-3s for people who are not already heart patients taking multiple drugs. The head researcher of the 2009 German study, Jochen Senges, said in a media statement that while his research team could not find any additional benefits of omega-3s within a year after patients were placed on multiple heart drugs "...it would be incorrect to say that omega-3 fatty acids are not effective."

So what did the new Dutch research actually show? The scientists added low doses of omega-3s to four different kinds of margarines and gave them to heart patients every day for more than three years. At the end of this period, the low dose omega-3s from fish oils hadn't added any heart protection to the patients who, as stated earlier, were all taking a variety of Big Pharma prescription meds.

In fact, about 14 percent of the heart attack patients had experienced another major cardiovascular event, and some had died. Women in the study who consumed low dose fish derived omega-3s added to ALA (alpha-linolenic acid, the plant-form of omega-3s) were almost one third less likely to develop more cardiac complications. However, this was deemed to be not quite enough of an impact to be statistically significant.

Bottom line: the Dutch study showed low doses of omega-3s don't do anything to help people who already have heart disease and have had myocardial infarctions and who also take a variety of drugs.

But the research does not negate the host of previous studies that have found cardioprotective benefits at higher doses. And it certainly does not mean -- as the spurious U.S. News and World Report headline implied -- that all the well documented studies showing omega-3s do have important cardiovascular benefits were somehow just an attempt at "magic".

For a detailed analysis of what the growing body of scientific research has revealed about omega-3s and heart health, check out a study just published in the journal Thrombosis and Haemostasis that has received virtually no media attention. Among the conclusions of a team of Italian scientists from the University of Milan: omega-3 fatty acids reduce overall mortality and mortality due to heart attacks and sudden death in patients with congestive heart disease; fish oil rich in omega-3s reduces heart rate, a major risk factor for sudden death; and consuming adequate omega-3s leads to a 10 to 33 percent net decrease in triglyceride levels.

http://www.naturalnews.com/029802_omega_3_studies.html


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:32 am 
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Green Tea and DHA: Nutrients Promote Health and Assist Weight Loss

(NaturalNews) Green tea and the Omega-3 fatty acid DHA combine to provide a powerful natural shield against certain forms of cancer, heart disease, stroke and dementia while assisting weight loss and maintenance. Both of these nutrients directly target gene sequences which have been shown to lower disease risk while increasing base metabolism to burn more calories. Include green tea and DHA in your nutritional arsenal to prevent a wide array of potentially lethal illnesses and reach your ideal weight loss goal.

Harness the Power of Green Tea Against Cancer

The active antioxidant compound in green and white tea is Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) which has been shown to exert significant anti-cancer properties by fighting development and proliferation of rogue cells. EGCG works by switching off the genes responsible for cancer initiation while influencing natural cell death to prevent replication. Chemical components of green tea further help to cut off the blood supply cancer cells need to grow while lowering levels of dangerous systemic inflammation known to promote cancer as well as many other diseases.

Green Tea Boosts Metabolism

The results of a study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition provide evidence that EGCG increases fat oxidation by 33% through accelerated metabolism. Green tea has also been shown to inhibit fat cell formation and improve excretion of fat from abdominal adipose tissue. This study found that fat was burned at a higher rate for 2 hours after eating and deceased rapidly after that point. The study authors recommend drinking green tea or supplementing with EGCG prior to eating for maximum benefit.

The researchers also noted that higher intake of green tea or EGCG does not necessarily translate into increased levels of fat oxidation. Fresh brew your own green tea or use low dose EGCG supplements (300 mg or less) to receive the full fat metabolism effect.

DHA Provides Support for the Heart and Brain

DHA is one of two Omega-3 fats found in fish and distilled fish oil. DHA has been shown to lower levels of inflammation, provide a thinning effect to blood platelets to prevent clotting and reduce dangerous triglycerides in the blood. These benefits all contribute to the heart health benefits of DHA as research demonstrates that supplementation can cut the risk of sudden death from a heart attack by one-third.

DHA is the preferred fat used in brain cell neurons as well as in most other cells in the body. Its unique properties allow for oxygen and nutrients to easily pass through the cell wall. When this vital fat is deficient, other fats must be used which create a stiffer cell membrane leading to cellular death and disease.

DHA Prevents Fat Accumulation

DHA works by influencing genes which control blood sugar, insulin secretion and fat accumulation. This Omega-3 fat targets the bioactive white adipose cells and affects how triglycerides in the blood are either burned for fuel or allowed to be stored as fat. The results of a study published in the International Journal of Obesity demonstrate the addition of DHA and Omega-3 fats increased weight loss in a group of overweight men by 28% compared to those who didn`t supplement.

It`s no surprise that natural nutrients and supplements act to promote health and assist weight loss. Green tea and DHA fats are prime examples of an intricate mechanism evolved over generations which our body uses to support our health. Incorporate these powerful nutrients into your lifestyle for improved quality of life and longevity.

http://www.naturalnews.com/029843_green_tea_DHA.html


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