Brain Tumour Survivor

A site dedicated to leading edge treatment for brain tumours
It is currently Tue Dec 12, 2017 7:08 am

All times are UTC + 10 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 1277 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 82, 83, 84, 85, 86  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2015 9:39 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
M.D. Anderson makes $100 million deal for cancer treatment using immune system

M.D. Anderson Cancer Center will receive $100 million in publicly traded stock as part of a licensing agreement involving an experimental cancer treatment that enlists the immune system to treat a patient's cancer.

M.D. Anderson will receive $50 million apiece from biotech company Intrexon and its partner ZIOPHARM Oncology for licensing the technology, which was discovered at the University of Minnesota and then developed for human use at the Houston research hospital. The technology involves customizing immune system attack cells, known as T cells, to find and kill cancer cells.

"Genetically engineering our patients' immune-system T cells to efficiently attack and destroy cancer cells represents one of the most exciting approaches with curative potential in oncology today," M.D. Anderson President Dr. Ron DePinho, said in a statement. "We believe coupling M.D. Anderson's unique CAR T cell approach with the powerful technologies of ZIOPHARM and Intrexon will allow us to build T cells that hit cancer harder, with greater precision, under tighter control and with potentially fewer side effects for patients."

At a December conference, M.D. Anderson researchers presented positive results in a small number of leukemia and lymphoma patients treated with the therapy, in which doctors remove the patient's T cells, implant a gene in them and infuse them back into the patient. The genetically engineered T cells are then awakened to go after the cancer.

The treatment is a kind of immunotherapy, a new frontier of cancer care now taking its place alongside surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. The most advanced kind, drug treatment that releases a brake that blocks T cells from attacking cancer cells, was pioneered by M.D. Anderson immunologist Jim Allison.

http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas ... 012873.php


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 16, 2015 9:26 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Breast and prostate cancer rates to surge

The Cancer Council of New South Wales says by 2017, the state will see the number of women in treatment, remission or recovery from breast cancer rise by as much as 40 per cent compared to 2007.

The number of men in the same situation with prostate cancer is expected to be up by 73 per cent.

"These statistics can extrapolate out to national statistics," Cancer Council NSW Associate Professor David Smith explained.

"We expect to see about 400,000 Australians diagnosed with prostate and breast cancer in 2017.

"That's a lot of people who will need treatment, support, ongoing access to monitoring and surveillance for their cancers.

"We're calling on the state government and the federal government to take these figures very seriously moving into the future because of the magnitude of the numbers we need to have in place, the infrastructure and the manpower to be able to adequate deal with them."

Catherine Rolston was diagnosed with breast cancer five years ago. She said regardless of age, family history or socioeconomic status, a diagnosis can happen to anyone.

"It was a huge shock," she said.

"I was just 26 years of age, I didn't have any family history of the disease.

"It's certainly not one of those things you're expecting. I thought I was a fairly young, fit and active 26 year old."

After melanoma, breast cancer remains the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Australian women.

The Cancer Council has attributed the rise in both breast and prostate cancer to an increase in incidence rates and survivorship of the diseases, as well as an ageing population.

"The good news is we are surviving longer with these cancers as a result of early detection, better treatment and better management," Associate Professor Smith said.

In most cases, regular breast and prostate cancer checks should begin around the age of 50.

http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2015 ... ates-surge


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 18, 2015 8:28 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Another drug rehab raises funding fears as waiting list grows

Another Canberra drug rehabilitation service is facing financial uncertainty, despite growing demand for its services threatening to triple its waiting lists.

The head of the Directions service said an expected deficit this financial year could force it to scale back its residential detoxification and transition program, which has seen a sharp rise in calls for help from methamphetamine users.

Directions sought extra money from the ACT Government last month to avoid a $150,000 deficit this year and has had no word from the federal government on funding after June.

Chief executive Fiona Trevelyan said the residential program, run at Arcadia House at Bruce, had 30 new assessments at the start of January for clients seeking admission.

"If all of the people applying are suitable for admission, it would mean that we would be starting the year with a six-month waiting list for any other new referrals," she said.

The waiting period for the 10-bed residential facility was now about eight weeks.

The federal government cut funding for the region's only residential drug and alcohol rehabilitation program for families two days before Christmas.

Drug rehab provider Karralika said that may force it to close the particular service in less than two months.

Directions' figures show 130 clients were assisted at Arcadia House in the last six months of 2014, up 19 per cent from the year before.

Of these clients, 47 per cent identified methamphetamine as a drug of concern, up from 29 per cent during the equivalent period in 2013.

The Salvation Army revealed the number of Canberrans seeking treatment from specialists after using amphetamines, including ice, increased 155 per cent in the three years to 2013.

The rate of ice use among injecting drug users in the ACT last year was almost equal to that of the two worst states on the measure, New South Wales and Victoria, with crystal meth used by 72 per cent of those Canberra drug takers.

Ms Trevelyan said the use of ice, which has proven to be linked with violence, provided extra complexity for treatment services.

"It could precipitate mental illness if there is an underlying vulnerability and it exacerbates psychosis – and makes it very difficult for service providers to understand what they're dealing with ... and to respond more appropriately," she said.

A spokesman for Health Minister Simon Corbell said a decision was expected to be made shortly on the request for additional recurrent money.

"Arcadia House, however, is expected to be able to treat more people in their day rehabilitation program following the allocation of new funding by ACT Health this year for the purchase and installation of a demountable [building] ... expected to be in place by the third quarter of this year," he said.

The spokesman said the government would be considering the increased demand on drug treatment services within the context of the budget process.

Psychosocial interventions, rather than medication-based therapies, would continue to be the focus of therapy for methamphetamine users, he said.

"Four sessions of brief cognitive behaviour therapy intervention are offered widely in Australian treatment settings and have been shown to be effective among methamphetamine users," the spokesman said.

Ms Trevelyan said there had not been any tender opportunity to renew the federal funding, which is worth about $700,000 annually and covers the day program and separate primary medical services.

"We've had no indication to think it would be cut, but we've got nothing for the reverse – we're hoping it would be rolled over for at least another year," she said.

A federal Health Department spokeswoman said funding to alcohol and drug treatment organisations beyond June 30 was still under consideration, with the findings of a review into the sector now being considered.

"While the government understands the importance of funding certainty, it is also important to make an informed decision," she said.

Directions have said people who use amphetamine type-stimulants – which includes ecstasy, cocaine and ice – mostly range from 16 to 28 years old and tend to use a variety of substances together.

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-new ... 2n6bo.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 11:55 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Comment: When ADHD isn't what it seems

The number of kids who are diagnosed with ADHD these days is huge—and growing. Reported cases of the disorder have increased by 42 per cent since 2003. But a new study suggests that some of these children might actually be suffering from a different condition that often goes undetected.

Most of the referrals that pediatrician Ira Chasnoff gets at his clinic at the Children’s Research Triangle in Chicago are for behavioral issues. He and his team analyzed a sample of 156 foster children who had been referred to his clinic and found that 81 percent of them had fetal alcohol spectrum disorders that had not previously been detected by a physician. The most common reason they had been referred to Chasnoff was ADHD.

FASD, as this group of conditions are known, is related to the better-known fetal alcohol syndrome and can cause similar behavioral and learning problems. Unlike children affected by fetal alcohol syndrome, which is the most severe condition on the spectrum, those with other types of FASD may not have facial anomalies. Thus, the issue may go unnoticed by physicians for years.

“Many alcohol babies will look normal, so no one thinks of doing the toxicology,” Chasnoff said. Nationally, about 20 per cent of women drink during pregnancy, but only about 3.6 per cent of children have been diagnosed with FASD. Race and class plays a role in under-diagnosis: In past studies, Chasnoff has found that doctors are more comfortable interviewing poor and African-American women about alcohol use than they are their white, middle-class patients—even though white women are, in some states, likelier to drink during pregnancy.

“Several of the kids were on inappropriate medications; many were receiving therapies they didn’t need.”
Most importantly, children who have FASD require different types of treatments than those who have standard hyperactivity disorder. “About 74 per cent of children with FASD do meet criteria for ADHD,” he said, “but, because of all the neurochemistry changes from the alcohol, it’s a different kind of ADHD.”

FASD-affected children are more likely to need additional therapies, like sensory integration and family therapy, that ADHD-affected children might not need. Before Chasnoff tested them, 11 of these 156 children had been on stimulant medications to treat their ADHD, but afterward, it turned out that only one of the children needed the drugs. Eight had been on psychotropic medications, and seven were taken off the drugs by Chasnoff.

What’s more, 6 per cent of the children in the sample had been wrongly given the diagnosis of FASD. That suggests to Chasnoff that pediatricians not only need to be more attuned to the possibility of FASD, but also require better tools for detecting the condition. He thinks any pediatrician who sees a child for behavioral health issues should at least consider FASD as one of the causes.

“The long-term prognosis of children with FASD might actually be worse, because if you don’t have a good diagnosis, you head off other therapeutic approaches,” he said. “Several of the kids were on inappropriate medications; many were receiving therapies they didn’t need.”

Chasnoff's sample consisted of adopted and foster children, so they might have a higher prevalence of FASD than the general population. Still, this suggests that some of the 3.5 million children currently taking medications for ADHD have a very different condition—one that began before they left the womb.

http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2015 ... t-it-seems


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 22, 2015 8:28 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Govt urged to create obesity action plan: Heart Foundation

THE state government should create an obesity action plan, according to Heart Foundation Tasmania chief executive Graeme Lynch.

On Tuesday, four leading health groups urged the federal government to take decisive action to stop the promotion of junk food and drink to children and to tax sweetened sugary drinks.

According to the Heart Foundation, if children don't lower their intake of fatty, sugary and salty foods, this generation may not live as long as their parents.

"If we don't start to address prevention, this might be the first generation of young Tasmanians that don't live as long as their parents," Mr Lynch said.

At a local level, Mr Lynch said more could be done by the state government to help Tasmanians become healthier people.

"We're also calling on the Tasmanian government to support legislation banning the advertising of junk food to children, they're particularly vulnerable," he said.

"Another big thing is to introduce taxation on sugary drinks . . . they're empty calories."

Mr Lynch called on the state government to create an obesity action plan, under the Green Health Paper, which is now open to public consultation.

He said the government must rethink its priorities, to reach its target for Tasmania to have the healthiest population in Australia by 2025.

"There needs to be a reallocation of some resources and thinking into an obesity prevention plan and to use population health measures like taxing food, menu labelling, junk food advertising to children, along with targeted social marketing campaigns," Mr Lynch said.

"To improve obesity, overweight Tasmanians should be active. . .they're the things that measure the health of the state."

However, Health Minister Michael Ferguson said Tasmania's obesity problem would not form part of the Clinical Services Profile that arose from the Green Paper.

According to Mr Ferguson, it would be part of the Healthy Tasmania initiative, a new whole-of-state benchmarking system which would be initiated to better measure public health outcomes.

"We continue to work co-operatively with the federal government and all relevant stakeholders on a range of health-related issues, however we don't believe new taxes are the answer," Mr Ferguson said.

The Heart Foundation allocated $480,000 last year to increase the intake of healthy food across Tasmania, after research from the University of Tasmania revealed only 5 per cent of shops in Tasmania with fresh fruit and vegetables were located in low-income areas.

All North-West councils are involved in the Healthy Food Access Project, working with the foundation, farmers, wholesalers, distributors, retailers and people in communities to build solutions to address access to healthy and affordable fresh foods.

http://www.theadvocate.com.au/story/283 ... ion/?cs=87


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2015 8:48 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Diseases linked to lifestyle choices are killing millions of people prematurely each year

Diseases linked to lifestyle choices, including diabetes and some cancers, kill 16 million people prematurely each year, the World Health Organisation says, urging action to stop the “slow-moving public health disaster”.

Unhealthy habits like smoking, alcohol abuse and consuming too much fat, salt and sugar have sparked an epidemic of diseases which together constitute the leading cause of death globally, WHO said.

This “lifestyle disease” epidemic “causes a much greater public health threat than any other epidemic known to man,” Shanthi Mendis, the lead author of WHO’s Chronic Diseases Prevention and Management report, said.

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), like cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, lung disease and a range of cancers, killed a full 38 million people around the globe in 2012 – 16 million of them under the age of 70.

“Not thousands are dying, but millions are dying . . . every year in their 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s, not in their 80s and 90s,” Mendis said.

“It’s beyond belief that it is seemingly invisible,” she said.

Most of the world’s 16 million premature NCD deaths each year – 82 per cent – occur in poor and middle income countries, and most of them could be averted with just small investments, the report found.

“The global community has the chance to change the course of the NCD epidemic,” WHO chief Margaret Chan said in a statement.

Millions of lives could be saved if the world over the next decade invests just $US11.2 billion ($A12.12 billion) each year, or $US1-3 per person, on promoting healthier habits, the report found.

Today, about six million people die prematurely each year due to tobacco use, 3.3 million deaths are linked to alcohol abuse, 3.2 million to lacking physical activity and 1.7 million to eating too much salt, according to WHO findings.

A full 42 million children under the age of five are considered to be obese, and an estimated 84 per cent of adolescents do not get enough exercise, Mendis said, describing the situations as “extremely frightening”.

The international community has staked out nine global targets for shifting unhealthy habits with the aim of slashing premature NCD deaths by a quarter between 2011 and 2025.

Simple and inexpensive steps like banning advertising of tobacco and alcohol products and taxing foods and drinks that contain high levels of salt and caffeine has already proven successful in a range of countries, WHO said.

In Turkey, for instance, an advertising ban on tobacco products combined with significant price hikes and health warnings has pushed smoking rates down 13.4-per cent since 2008.

A move in Hungary to heavily tax unhealthy food and drink components has meanwhile led to a 27-per cent drop in junk food sales, the report said.

But while some countries have made progress, most will fall short of the 2025 target, WHO said, warning that inaction would have far-reaching consequences.

“When people fall sick and die in the prime of their lives, productivity suffers, and the cost of treating diseases can be devastating,” the UN health agency said.

It has estimated that if nothing is done to improve the situation, premature NCD deaths will suck $US7.0 trillion out of the global economy over the next decade.

http://www.maitlandmercury.com.au/story ... -epidemic/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2015 4:18 pm 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Pre-breakfast exercise helps with weight loss and insulin resistance

Getting up and at 'em may mean more than just extra hours in your day.

Research shows that we might just reap more rewards by exercising early.

In a new story, the New York Times has explored whether working out before breakfast is better for weight loss.

Certainly, some studies have shown that fasted exercise (that is, exercising before you eat in the morning having fasted overnight) can improve endurance and energy as well as metabolism and muscle growth.

The NYT article also points to a 'groundbreaking' study from 2010, in which scientists found we can burn more fat from fasted exercise too.

In the six-week Belgian study, healthy male participants were convinced to gorge themselves with 30 per cent more calories than they ordinarily ate and divided into three groups.

The first group stayed sedentary for the six weeks and ended up three kilograms heavier and developed insulin resistance.

The second group, who exercised after breakfast, put on about 1½ kilograms and also recorded insulin spikes. The third group, on the other hand, exercised before eating each day and not only maintained their weight and insulin levels, they also burned more fat throughout the day.

"The optimal strategy to prevent increases in body weight is obviously to combine a healthy, well-balanced diet with a physically active lifestyle," said the study's lead author Peter Hespel.

However, if you're not nailing the diet side of things, their study showed, he said, "that early-morning exercise in the fasted state is more potent than an identical amount of exercise in the fed state".

"Incorporating fasted training into your daily regime not only helps to expedite weight loss, it improves mental focus and steadier energy levels throughout the day compared to starting the day out with a dose of sugar … even if that sugar is coming from a natural source, like a ripe, spotty banana," adds nutritionist, athlete and author Nell Stephenson.

"In very basic terms, if you get up and start moving without having supplied your body with a dose of sugar, it's simply got to get its energy from somewhere else and that somewhere else happens to be stored fat."

On the flipside, if you get your groove on a little later in the day, all is not lost.

In fact, a separate set of research has found that muscle strength tends to peak between 2pm and 6pm. Hand-eye co-ordination and lung function also naturally peaks around this time, while risk of injury is at its least.

It's all to do with our natural body clock explains Michael Smolensky, author of The Body Clock Guide to Better Health.

It seems that picking when you exercise may just depend on your goals as there are benefits to getting moving at any time.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/well- ... resistance


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 29, 2015 2:07 pm 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Improving hospitals the focus of significant Hobart healthcare conference

With Australian healthcare attracting more scrutiny than ever, the performance of hospitals, including Tasmania’s, will be the focus of an international conference in Hobart in March.

The inaugural ‘Sustainable Healthcare Transformation’ conference will address the challenges of delivering quality hospital care in an era of rising patient demand and tighter funding.

Particular attention will be paid to the benefits of developing more innovative ways of providing care, according to Associate Professor Craig Quarmby, Health Services Innovation Tasmania Co-Director.

“This will be a valuable event for anyone whose focus is providing high-quality care in a tight fiscal environment,” Associate Professor Quarmby said.

“At a time of growing demand and finite budgets, both at a state level and federally, it is unrealistic for the health sector to try and spend its way to improvement. Nationally and internationally, it has been shown that inpatient and out-of-hospital care can be done much better when the right systems are put in place.

“Some of these innovations have already been implemented, many are being planned, while others have yet to be identified and explored.”

The conference is designed for:

- Medical, nursing and allied health clinicians from the primary care or acute sectors both public and private.

- Health service and hospital managers.

- Policy makers within government.

- Educators and researchers.

Conference speakers come from the forefront of transformative change in the field of healthcare, higher education and manufacturing industry. As leaders in innovative organisations they have a range of valuable experiences to share with clinicians and healthcare planners in Tasmania and beyond.

http://www.transformingthenation.com.au ... onference/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 01, 2015 10:47 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Try these three ways to love your liver

DOCTOR CALLING: A weekly column by Dr Kevin Hill, chairman of South Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group, addressing topical health issues

How healthy is your liver? There are three ways to a healthy liver and South Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group (SL CCG) is supporting a campaign by the British Liver Trust to raise local residents’ awareness of these steps.

The Love Your Liver campaign is focused around making the public aware of the risks from alcohol, obesity and viral hepatitis in order to help reduce the number of people affected by liver disease.

As part of the campaign an app has been developed to help you reduce your alcohol intake, along with an online health test to assess your risk factors.

Between the years 2001 and 2012, figures show that the number of people who died with an underlying cause of liver disease in England increased by 40% from 7,841 to 10,948.

Liver disease is the fifth biggest killer in the UK and the fastest-growing, but because the symptoms develop quietly it means it can be diagnosed at a late stage.

Dr Kevin Hill, Chair of NHS South Lincolnshire CCG, said: “Love Your Liver is a great campaign to support as it raises awareness and gives people a better understanding of the three main risk factors in liver disease.

“It’s particularly important at this time of year after the indulgence of the Christmas period.

“The main concern is that the symptoms of liver disease often develop silently, so it is important to reduce your alcohol intake and lead a healthy lifestyle.

“Liver disease is preventable and by cutting out alcohol for two or three days in a row in a week, eating a healthy diet and taking more exercise you help maintain good liver health.”

If anyone is concerned that they may have contracted viral hepatitis, you should book an appointment with your GP and get tested.”

The Spruce app, which has been developed to support the campaign, can be downloaded to encourage people to take three days off alcohol a week and drink sensibly when they do. The free app can be downloaded at http://loveyourliver.org.uk/spruce/

You can also take an online test to find out how healthy your liver is here.

The Love Your Liver Health Screener asks you a number of questions relating to your health to assess your risk factors and advise if you might be at risk of liver damage.

The campaign also includes a national roadshow across the country offering free liver health assessments to the public.

For more information, please visit: http://loveyourliver.org.uk

http://www.spaldingtoday.co.uk/news/hea ... -1-6553816


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 04, 2015 8:31 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Cancer message slip, slop slipping

Australians are becoming blase about sun protection, with research showing more than two million are getting sunburnt on a typical summer weekend.

Cancer Council research shows that about 430,000 more adults are getting sunburnt than they were four years ago, raising their risk of skin cancer.

Findings from a national sun survey show the downward trend in adult sunburn since 2003 has turned around, prompting concerns that people have become complacent about the dangers of excessive exposure to UV rays.

Cancer Council national skin cancer committee chairwoman Vanessa Rock said the results were a wake-up call that highlighted the need for Government to re-invest in national mass market skin cancer prevention campaigns.

“While this latest research demonstrates the number of Australians who were getting sunburnt is still significantly lower than 10 years ago, the recent increase is cause for concern,” she said.

“The survey suggests men in particular are neglecting sun protection, with 18 per cent getting sunburnt on the weekend, compared to 12 per cent of women.”

Cancer Council WA SunSmart manager Mark Strickland said people were spending a lot of time outside on weekends during peak UVR times, averaging 116 minutes.

It was worrying that only 48 per cent of West Australians surveyed wore hats in the sun, and many of those opted for caps rather than the recommended broad-brimmed hats.

“I would say to them to put their cap on and go stand in the sun and take a ‘selfie’ and see how much sun is hitting their face, because they might be surprised,” he said.

“People know they should be covering up, but when we ask them how they got sunburnt they say things like they didn’t know they were going to be in the sun that long or just forgot to put sunscreen on.”

https://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/lates ... -slipping/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 07, 2015 8:06 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Obesity Causes Cancer

Overweight people are at increased risk of developing cancer, especially cancer of the breast, endometrium, colon and rectum.

Studies, including one by the National Cancer Institute, USA, indicate that there is a direct link between obesity and cancer. Doctors even say that unless the obesity epidemic is controlled, obesity could overtake smoking as the leading cause of cancer.

The Overseas Development Institute found that Indians constitute one in three adults who are obese; a total of 1.46 billion people across the world. A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, which followed 90,000 American adults, revealed that the heaviest participants were more likely to die of cancer than participants with healthy weight.

Both obesity and cancer result from the body losing its ability to burn fat as fuel. Obesity is linked to excess levels of insulin circulating in the blood, and this can cause harmful cell proliferation. It also increases oxidative stress levels in overweight people, increasing the risk of cancer. Excess fat cells, when partially metabolised, become carcinogenic. In women, obesity exposes them to higher estrogen levels because estrogen is produced in fat tissue. Obese women therefore have more estrogen, which leads to insulin resistance and the development of more fat tissue, which produces more estrogen, making it a cycle that increases the risk of estrogen-sensitive cancers.

In Turkey, about 79,000 new cancer cases were attributed to smoking and obesity. Lung cancer was the most common among men, while women usually suffered from breast cancer. Of the total 97,000 cancer cases among men and 62,000 cancer cases among women, 40,000 cases were attributed to obesity. Lung cancer mostly affects men who smoke more than women do. Obesity, as a cause of cancer, affects women more than men as two-thirds of the obesity-related cancer cases were among women.

An awareness campaign has been started in Turkey among schoolchildren so that they change their unhealthy eating habits. Introduction of dried nuts and fruits in school meals and the construction of bicycle lanes are among the projects being undertaken to fight obesity in Turkey.

http://au.ibtimes.com/obesity-causes-cancer-1418515


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 10, 2015 11:55 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Physical, psychosocial factors can significantly increase risk of low back pain

New research reveals the physical and psychosocial factors that significantly increase the risk of low back pain onset. In fact results published in Arthritis Care & Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), show that being engaged in manual tasks involving awkward positions will increase the risk of low back pain by eight times. Those who are distracted during activities or fatigued also significantly increase their risk of acute low back pain.

At some point, nearly 10% of the world's population experience back pain, which is the leading cause of disability according to the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Burden of Disease report (2010). WHO reports that low back pain has a greater impact on global health than malaria, diabetes, or lung cancer; yet little progress has been made to identify effective prevention strategies.

"Understanding which risk factors contribute to back pain and controlling exposure to these risks is an important first step in prevention," explains Associate Professor Manuela Ferreira, Ph.D., with The George Institute for Global Health and Sydney Medical School at The University of Sydney in New South Wales, Australia. "Our study is the first to examine brief exposure to a range of modifiable triggers for an acute episode of low back pain."

For this case-crossover study, researchers recruited 999 participants from 300 primary care clinics in Sydney, Australia, who had an acute low back pain episode between October 2011 and November 2012. Study subjects were asked to report exposure to 12 physical or psychosocial factors in the 96 hours prior to the onset of back pain.

The risk of a new episode of low back pain significantly increased due to a range of triggers, from an odds ratio of 2.7 for moderate to vigorous physical activity to 25.0 for distraction during an activity. Researchers found that age moderated the effect of exposure to heavy loads, with odds ratio for individuals 20, 40, or 60 years of age at 13.6, 6.0, and 2.7, respectively. A new finding not reported previously was that back pain risk was highest between 7:00 a.m. and noon.

"Understanding which modifiable risk factors lead to low back pain is an important step toward controlling a condition that affects so many worldwide," concludes A/Prof Ferreira. "Our findings enhance knowledge of low back pain triggers and will assist the development of new prevention programs that can reduce suffering from this potentially disabling condition."

http://www.news-medical.net/news/201502 ... -pain.aspx


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 11:45 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Napping May Fix Negative Effects Of Lack Of Sleep

Conventional wisdom that says you can't do much about a poor night's sleep is wrong, and the negative effects of a sleepless night can be reversed with a brief daytime nap, a study suggests.

A quick 40 winks during the afternoon appears to restore proteins and hormones affected by the stress of sleep loss and can bring the body's immune system back up to normal, researchers found.

In a small study, 11 volunteer men between the ages of 25 and 32 were restricted to just 2 hours of sleep a night, which resulted in a doubling of their levels of norepinephrine, a stress hormone that can elevate heart rate, blood pressure and levels of blood sugar.

The also displayed reduced levels of a protein known as interleukin-6 that is involved in fighting off viruses.

On subsequent nights they were again restricted to 2 hours of sleep, but then were allowed two 30-minute naps on the following days.

After the naps, the volunteers' levels of norepinephrine and interleukin-6 were back to normal, researchers report in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

"Our data suggests a 30-minute nap can reverse the hormonal impact of a night of poor sleep," says study author Brice Faraut of the Universite Paris Descartes-Sorbonne Paris Cite in France. "This is the first study that found napping could restore biomarkers of neuroendocrine and immune health to normal levels."

Lack of sleep can bring health problems such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and depression, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

Insufficient sleep is also linked to reduced work productivity and often seen as a factor in traffic and industrial accidents, the CDC says.

Around three in 10 American adults sleeps for fewer than 6 hours a night, less than the recommended 7 to 9 hours, the National Health Interview Survey has found.

That suggests there's a need for continued research on sleep loss and ways to counteract it, Faraut says.

"Napping may offer a way to counter the damaging effects of sleep restriction by helping the immune and neuroendocrine systems to recover," he says. "The findings support the development of practical strategies for addressing chronically sleep-deprived populations, such as night and shift workers."

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/32091 ... -sleep.htm


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2015 5:57 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Modern diet may be driving us crazy

Is big business sending us mad?

It's the tantalising question flowing logically from studies linking what we eat with how we think.

Felice Jacka, of Deakin University, a pioneer in this mushrooming field, explains in The Conversation that we are only now starting to realise the effects on mental health of profound changes to our diet over the past half century.

The fruit, vegetables and wholegrains which our grandmothers would readily recognise as food have been displaced with highly processed sweet, salty and fatty foods. These products of the global food industry not only appeal to our evolutionary preferences but are somewhat addictive. Cue obesity epidemic.

On the bright side, you could say our range of guilty pleasures is expanding. The trouble is, as we discover more about the effects of different foods on our health, the part that's expanding along with our waists is not the pleasure part but the guilty part.

We now know obesity increases the risk of depression and dementia. People who eat more unhealthy and junk foods are at increased risk of depression. And hypertension, high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, elevated blood pressure and high BMI are all risk factors for dementia, as well as being associated with unhealthy diets.

Until very recently the idea that what you put in your mouth could affect your mental health was scoffed at. But now, "the mind-body dichotomy that has informed much psychiatric practice throughout history is beginning to appear artificial and redundant" writes Dr Jacka, who is also president of the International Society for Nutritional Psychiatry Research.

As yet, the research has established only an association between diet and mental illness, not cause and effect. But there may turn out to be more to "gut feeling" than we thought, because gut bacteria influences brain chemistry and development, and is in turn influenced by diet. Comfort food is losing its comfort, unless your grandmother made it.

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/comment ... 3ekpu.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2015 8:12 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
The Block star Darren Jolly's relief after brain tumour scare

The Block star and former AFL player Darren Jolly has described his shock and fear after doctors found a lump in the middle of his brain earlier this month.

In an exclusive interview with A Current Affair, the father-of-two has now confirmed the lump found was a benign cyst.

The good news came after the former Collingwood player suffered a headache which triggered the brain tumour diagnosis.

"It was a really sharp pain in the front of my head," Mr Jolly said.

The former Collingwood player and his wife, Deanne have returned to compete in The Block: Triple Threat, and it was during filming earlier this month that Mr Jolly started feeling unwell.

The 33-year-old endured about three days of headaches before deciding to go see a doctor.

"He just said it was probably a sinus problem and don't worry about it," Mr Jolly recounted of his doctor's visit.

But the former AFL player didn't feel his sinuses were the issue and booked another appointment with his radiologist.

"I knew the radiologist from my footy days, and he had a look for me and he said, 'listen, we need to go have an MRI straight away, there's something there and we need to know what it is," Mr Jolly said.

Later that day he was told he had a lump on his brain.

"It was all very quick as well," Deanne Jolly told A Current Affair.

"We had to go straight to the hospital; we were met by a neurosurgeon straight away, pack a bag and be admitted, so it was very sudden."

Mr Jolly underwent brain surgery the next day.

Surgeons cut a lesion on the left side of his brain, drilled into his brain to drain the cist. A biopsy was taken at the front of the brain of the tumour to test whether it was benign or malignant.

After a tense wait for results, the Jollys were given the news they were hoping for.

"It just ended up being a cyst. It was nothing dangerous which was fantastic news for us," Mrs Jolly said.

"We hugged and ... just felt so relieved."

Mr Jolly will need to monitor himself across the next couple of years, with doctors telling him there's a 50 percent chance it'll start growing again.

The Melbourne couple has returned to The Block after walking away with just $10,000 in last year's series.

"We love it. We love the level of busy-ness, we love the interaction with the cast and crew and all of that," Ms Jolly said.

"We do feel that we were lucky to be offered another opportunity to have another go and have a happy ending."

They say their TV return was also to send a message to their two daughters.

"Things aren't going to work out in life and things aren't going to go your way, but it's important to pretty much get back on the horse and give it another go," Mr Jolly said.

http://www.9news.com.au/national/2015/0 ... mour-scare


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 1277 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 82, 83, 84, 85, 86  Next

All times are UTC + 10 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.119s | 13 Queries | GZIP : Off ]