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PostPosted: Thu Apr 08, 2010 11:01 am 
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Heal yourself in 15 days with the joy of exercising in nature

(NaturalNews) In our 15-day self-healing series, we've so far covered everything from juicing and fasting to how to stop making disease. But we haven't yet covered one of the elements most commonly associated with self-healing: Exercise!

But don't groan: This isn't going to be some boring rehash of the same old stuff you've always heard about exercise, such as "you have to exercise an hour a day." Rather, I'd like to invite you to think about exercise in a whole new light... about finding the FUN in exercise!

In my view, exercise shouldn't be something that's a daily grind. If it feels like work, something's not right with it. I'm all about finding ways to exercise that don't even feel like exercise at all -- the kind of things that, when you're finished an hour later, you say to yourself, "Wow, that was exercise, too? Cool!"

Obviously, I'm not talking about a treadmill grind here. Sure, a treadmill can burn off the calories and do wonders for your stamina and muscle tone, but to me it still feels a lot like work. That's why I try to find alternative fun things to do. In fact, I don't even call them WORKouts. I call them FUNouts!

What's fun?

If you think about it, the most fun ways to exercise are things that give your mind something to focus on rather than the exercise. In fact, the "fun" versus "work" factor of exercise is all about your FOCUS. When you mind is focused on the work, every step feels like a mountain to climb, but when your mind is experiencing something else (such as the scenery around you), then suddenly your work is no longer the focus of your attention.

That's why the real secret to effortless, joyful exercise is so incredibly simple that you'll probably find it funny. Here it is, just three little words that contain a whole lot of wisdom and experience about making exercise fun:

Exercise in nature.

That's it: Exercise in nature. And it doesn't even matter what kind of exercise you do, really, as long as it's outside, in nature. You can walk, ride, jump, skip, swim, shuffle, push, pull, roll, lift, surf, sail or do just about anything else that involves moving your bod for an hour or so.

Walk along a city park or a nature trail. Toss a frisbee with a friend. Slap a volleyball over the net or hurl some horseshoes on a piece of lawn. Jump rope on the sidewalk or swing on a tree branch.

Don't forget how to play

Do these things sound silly to you? One thing I've noticed about adults is that too many adults have forgotten how to play like children. We all played like children when we were children, right? But when we grow up, we no longer think it's "mature" to skip along in a game of hopscotch on the sidewalk or toss a frisbee in the park. But in my opinion, we need to relearn how to play like children because "playing" is the best way to get exercise without feeling like it's work.

That's why I've found lots of joy in playing for exercise. I like to ride a trike (a recumbent bicycle with a really comfortable seat) on the sidewalk or do bear crawls in the grass. Neighborhood playgrounds, I've found, are filled with all kinds of useful equipment that even adults can often use, from climbing the ropes to swinging around on the "monkey bars" as we used to call them.

Part of this successful habit of playing, of course, involves you rejecting the mainstream crowd and getting comfortable just doing what's healthy and fun, regardless of what the other limited-thinking people might say about it. Just because they forgot how to play doesn't mean you have to limit YOUR fun to THEIR lack of imagination. In fact, "rejecting the crowd" is the topic of part seven of this 15-day series on self healing: http://www.naturalnews.com/028136_s...

If you open up your options, there's fun to be found everywhere around you in nature. You can play catch with a baseball, kick around a soccer ball or roll around in the spring grass with your family dog. You can learn to juggle, or spin poi (as I do), or take on a serious hike at an exotic natural destination.

I do many of these things on a frequent basis, from juggling and playing catch to walking, hiking and biking. My exercise is always fun... and it never feels like work to me. While indoor gyms can be great places to go (especially during the winters), they are not my first choice for FUNouts. That's why I encourage everyone to follow these three simple steps for finding the joy in your exercise:

Step 1) Get outside. Let nature be your playground.
Step 2) Learn how to play, and play outside the box!
Step 3) Play regularly and with lots of variety.

And, of course, don't listen to non-fun people who judge you for playing. Don't be that snooty, stodgy grown-up who has forgotten the simple joys of outdoor playtime.

Life can be recess, folks! And you can have recess every single day. Just get outside, have fun, re-learn how to play and turn your WORKouts into FUNouts!

http://www.naturalnews.com/028531_exerc ... doors.html


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 10:59 am 
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Practice Fun Exercise Routines for Good Health

NaturalNews) Detest exercise? Tired of mind-numbingly boring minutes spent on a treadmill or endless laps up and down the pool? While the majority of us recognize that we must exercise for good health, many view exercise as just one more boring chore to add onto a day laden with "must-do" activities. Change your mindset and make exercise fun and exciting while getting the workout your body needs.

Dance Your Way to Fitness

For those who love to dance, try a Zumba Latin American dance class next time you are at the gym. Zumba is taught in 75 countries in six continents and is aligned with nationally and internationally recognized fitness organizations. People have so much fun learning to dance while toning legs, arms and raising the heart rate that they are generally disappointed when the class is over. It's more like a party than a workout.

The Zumba instructor may teach Latin dances such as the salsa, meringue, cumbia, cha-cha, belly dance, samba and Flamenco. Other dances such as African dance, hip-hip, or choreographed dances may be incorporated into the class. The instructor will continue to add onto the basic steps of each dance and teach more complicated rhythms and movements. High impact dances are combined with lower impact dances to keep the heart rate up and the muscles active. Zumba can be purchased on DVD to do at home.

Tai Chi

Medical studies show Tai Chi improves balance, muscle strength, focus, sleep quality, and a number of other causes of health-damaging stress. Tai Chi is an exercise for anyone at any age and of any physical ability and is a gentle low impact, mind/body exercise and stretching routine.

Each posture flows into the next without pause, ensuring that the body is in constant motion. Focusing the mind solely on the movements of the form is said to bring about a state of mental calm and clarity.

Get Active

Exercise does not have to be limited to a session at the gym. Simply becoming more active, going for a walk or run outside, swimming or riding a bike for fun, playing with the kids, gardening or spring cleaning are activities that can give the body a strenuous workout, without it seeming like drudgery.

Try something completely new, like horse-riding lessons, golfing or fishing, for outdoor fun that will get the mind concentrating on mastering the activity, with the added health benefit of physical exercise.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028569_exercise_health.html


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2010 1:06 pm 
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Physical activity helps breast cancer patients survive

Physical activity has been known to reduce breast cancer risk. A new study suggests post-diagnosis physical activity can also drastically reduce risk of death from breast cancer.

The study published in the April 22, 2010 issue of Medical Oncology showed that post-diagnosis physical activity reduced breast mortality by 34 percent. Additionally, physical activity reduced mortality in general by 41 percent.

For the study, Ibrahim E. M. and Al-Homaidh A. from International Medical Center in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, meta-analyzed data from six studies of 12,108 patients with breast cancer.

The researchers found pre-diagnosis physical activity did not reduce breast cancer death risk, but it did reduce all causes of mortality by 18 percent.

Body mass index made some difference. Prediagnosis physical activity reduced breast Cancer mortality in women with body mass index less than 25 kg/m2, while post-diagnosis physical activity reduced the risk in those whose BMI was greater than 25 kg/m2. Post-diagnosis physical activity reduced all causes of mortality, regardless of BMI status.

Post-diagnosis physical activity also reduced the risk of disease recurrence by 24 percent.

Among patients with estrogen receptor (ER) - positive tumor, post-diagnosis physical activity reduced breast cancer deaths by 50 percent and all causes of mortality by 64 percent, while it did not have an effect on women with ER-negative disease.

The researchers concluded that physical activity increases breast cancer survival.

One study, led by M.W. Dewhirst and colleagues from Duke University Medical Center,explains why exercise could reduce risk of breast cancer and all-cause mortality in patients with diagnosed breast cancer.

Dewhirst et al. implanted human breast cancer cells in mice,and then compared tumor growth in one physically active group with another, sedentary control group.

They found breast cancer growth was comparable in both the exercise and sedentary groups.

However, physiological functions such as blood perfusion and vascularization were improved in the exercise group compared to the sedentary group.

Physical activity or exercise is just one way to help prevent breast cancer. Many other factors may also affect of breast cancer risk. For instance, high levels of plasma vitamin D may help reduce breast cancer risk by up to 70 percent.

Breast cancer is diagnosed in more than 170,000 women each year in the United States; the disease kills about 50,000 annually in the country, according to the National Cancer Institute.

http://www.foodconsumer.org/newsite/Non ... 10065.html


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 28, 2010 12:32 am 
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Amen to this posting!
Last week was walk you child to school day. My son and I didn't just walk...we skipped to school - stride n stride - together.... you wouldn't believe it but my upper thighs were sore the next two days! It's one mile to the school and one mile back to our house... what a great way to start my day that was... Such a joy too! This weekend my son and i were at the park playing and I started doing cartwheels in the grass and then i raced him to the ballpark... He started laughing and said.."MOM your acting like a KID!' and I said...'Wonderful! I don't want to grow old!'.....

Don't forget to be child-like every so often!!! It Brings joy to the heart!

My favorite thing these days is to take my two dogs out for a walk around the trails and lake close to our house...it's so nice to get out and see nature! And when I get home the dogs are tired and so am I and it doesn't seem like work....! Quite a Stress releiver too!


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 28, 2010 9:24 pm 
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Women can dramatically slash their risk of strokes through regular walking

(NaturalNews) A large, long-term study just reported in the American Heart Association journal Stroke has great news for women. Once again, a non-drug approach to avoiding one of the country's top killers has been shown to be a powerful "prescription". Harvard researchers found that women can dramatically slash their risk for both clot-caused (ischemic) strokes as well as bleeding (hemorrhagic) strokes by simply walking regularly.

"Though the exact relationship among different types of physical activity and different stroke subtypes remains unclear, the results of this specific study indicate that walking, in particular, is associated with lower risk of stroke," Jacob R. Sattelmair, M.Sc., lead author and doctoral candidate in epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, said in a statement to the media.

The research team followed 39,315 U.S. female health professionals with an average age of 54 who were taking part in the Women's Health Study. Every two to three years, the study participants reported the physical activities they'd engaged in during the past years -- including walking or hiking, jogging, running, biking, doing aerobic exercise/aerobic dance, using exercise machines, playing tennis, swimming, or doing yoga. The women also reported how fast they tended to walk -- whether their walking pace was casual (about 2 mph), normal (2.9 mph), brisk (3.9 mph) or very brisk (4 mph).

At the end of the study, the researchers found that women who were the most active in their leisure time activities were 17 percent less likely to have any type of stroke compared to the least-active women. However, walking appeared to be an especially effective form of exercise when it came to preventing strokes.

Overall, compared to women who didn't walk for exercise, the Harvard study found that women who usually walked at a brisk pace had a 37 percent lower risk of any type of stroke and those who walked two or more hours a week had a 30 percent lower risk of any type of stroke.

When the researchers looked at how many of the study participants had specific kinds of strokes, they found that those who usually walked at a brisk pace had a 25 percent lower risk of blood clot-caused strokes. Those who usually walked more than two hours weekly had a 21 percent lower risk of this type of ischemic stroke.

While those figures are significant, the results of walking on preventing hemorrhagic strokes turned out to be downright amazing. Women who typically walked briskly had a 68 percent lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke and those who walked two or more hours a week had a 57 percent lower risk of this type of bleeding stroke.

"Physical activity, including regular walking, is an important modifiable behavior for stroke prevention," Sattelmair stated. "Physical activity is essential to promoting cardiovascular health and reducing risk of cardiovascular disease, and walking is one way of achieving physical activity."

If you want to make sure you are walking at a brisk pace, Sattelmair said you can use a heart rate monitor or simply estimate with the so-called "talk test". At a brisk pace, you should be able to talk but not able to sing. "If you cannot talk, slow down a bit. If you can sing, walk a bit faster," he explained in the press statement.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028656_strokes_walking.html


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PostPosted: Thu May 06, 2010 8:59 pm 
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How Exercise Relieves Stress and Anxiety

(NaturalNews) Managing stress and relieving the symptoms of workplace stress can be accomplished by having a regular exercise routine. Regular and consistent exercise will not only alleviate stress but will also contribute to overall health and a feeling of well being.

Causes of Stress

Stress is an every day occurrence for most people. There are exams to be written, deadlines to keep, rush hour traffic to negotiate and so on. Most of these so called "external" factors that cause stress can't be avoided. If they can't be avoided, then exposure to stress needs to be managed by avoiding situations that will cause stress as much as possible. Limit the risk, so to speak. If that can't be done, then manage the body's reaction to stress so as to handle stress and anxiety better.

Coping with stress and the effects of stress need not be complicated or expensive. A simple program of regular exercise is all it takes to reduce stress related health problems. Exercise can even eliminate some of the so called "internal" causes of stress, which are related to one's frame of mind and outlook on life.

How Exercise Relieves Stress and Anxiety

Exercise essentially burns away the chemicals like cortisol and norepinephrine that cause stress. At the same time, vigorous exercise releases endorphins into the system. Endorphins are morphine-like hormones that are responsible for the feeling of elation, or well being that distance runners get from running. Other chemicals like dopamine and serotonin are also released in the brain during exercise. Together, these give a feeling of safety and security that contributes to off-setting some of the "internal" causes of stress, such as uncertainty, pessimism and negative self-talk.

To benefit from exercise, it needs to be regular. Exercise needs to be part of a daily routine. Instead of working during lunch, why not take the time to go for a brisk walk, a run or work out at a gym? Exercise will reduce stress and reducing stress can increase productivity.

Since exercise reduces stress chemically, it can also have a meditative effect during sustained cardiovascular work outs. The rhythmic running on the open road or treadmill can relax and clear the mind. Clearing the mind allows for a fresh approach to perplexing and stressful problems.

Regular exercise also impacts on the way you feel about yourself. For example, if clothes fit comfortably and your body is toned due to regular exercise, you feel good about yourself. If you feel good about yourself, your self confidence is given a boost and stress due to feelings of inadequacy is reduced as a result. It will not only make you healthier but regular exercise will also cut down on stress and anxiety and their associated symptoms.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028727_exercise_anxiety.html

[comment - people with cancer have more cause then most to feel stress and anxiety. Exercising benefits both the mind and body]


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PostPosted: Thu May 13, 2010 3:20 pm 
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Exercise 'can reduce breast cancer risk'

Undertaking regular exercise can reduce an individual's risk of developing breast cancer, a study suggests.

Research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research found that women who put on excess weight after the age of 20 significantly increase their risk of getting the disease.

Furthermore, the study discovered that women who undergo a five point increase in their BMI nearly double their risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.

The study monitored over 72,000 women - more than 3,600 of whom developed breast cancer.

Arlene Wilkie, director of research and policy at Breast Cancer Campaign, said: "We already know that being overweight after the menopause can increase a woman's risk of breast cancer, so we would recommend maintaining a healthy body weight throughout life by combining regular exercise with a balanced, low-fat diet avoiding fatty foods and limiting alcohol intake."

Mr Wilkie added that women should check their breasts regularly so that if they do develop the disease it can be tackled early.

He stressed that it is important for women to be familiar with how their breasts look and feel normally so they can spot any changes quickly - and do not mistake differences that happen at various times of the month for potential cancer warning signs.

One in nine women in the UK will develop press cancer at some point in their life, making Mr Wilkie's advice especially pertinent.

Research by the American Association for Cancer Research highlighted the link between this disease and weight.

Scientists discovered that women who reported a BMI increase of 5 kg/m2 or more between age 20 and 50 were at an 88 per cent increased risk of developing postmenopausal breast cancer, compared to women who reported a stable BMI.

Those whose BMI increased by 5 kg/m2 or more between age 20 and 50 increased their risk of getting breast cancer by 56 per cent, compared with women who maintained BMI.

"This new research adds to the increasing evidence that leading a healthy lifestyle from a young age is very important," said Mr Wilkie.

According to statistics from the Breakthrough Breast Cancer, breast cancer accounts for nearly one in three of all cancers in women and over 80 per cent of these cases occur in women over 50 years old.

Perhaps surprisingly, 300 men are diagnosed with breast cancer each year in the UK.

But thanks to better awareness, better screening and better treatments women than ever in the UK are surviving breast cancer.

http://www.uknetguide.co.uk/Health_and_ ... 05057.html


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PostPosted: Sun May 16, 2010 12:11 pm 
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Triathlete races through cancer treatment

Across a room full of racers, people signing up for the Florida International Triathlon, I spotted Dana Westmark's white bandana.

"I'm easy to find," she joked. "The short, bald one."

Westmark, a Sarasota real estate agent, lost her hair during chemotherapy treatments for breast cancer. She has not lost her will to compete.

Today the 46-year-old will swim, pedal and run up and down Siesta Key.

This will be her first international distance triathlon: a 1,500-meter swim, 26-mile bike and 10K run. Her goal for the race is simple.

"To finish," she said. "I'm much slower than I used to be, but the training gives me something positive to look forward to. And the camaraderie, just hanging with the folks."

Eight2Tri training

Hundreds of racers will participate in the International Triathlon and a shorter sprint race.

Westmark, who remains lean and fit, will be one of those triathletes moving up to the longer distance.

"When I first made the commitment, it felt like a big leap," she said. "Now, it doesn't seem so big. I'm prepared."

Westmark was diagnosed with breast cancer in December. After a lumpectomy, she began chemotherapy treatments. Her doctors said she could continue to train and race.

To prepare for the Siesta Key event, Westmark joined a a triathlon training group called Eight2Tri.

On Wednesdays, she enjoyed big training sessions. On Thursdays, she endured chemotherapy.

Racing is one of her rewards.

Sometimes Westmark gets hot during a race and takes off her bandana. Sometimes her friends draw little pictures on the back of her head.

"I had a cat once," she said, laughing. "And a bunny for Easter."

Marathon plan

Westmark bought a wig for her real estate job, but she only wore it for a week. Friends and colleagues said she didn't need it.

Her husband Michael, who is also bald and also a triathlete, joked that she would save time on grooming, which turned out to be true.

"I've turned into the happiest bald girl in Sarasota," she said. "I can get ready for work in 11 minutes."

Westmark still has a few chemotherapy sessions left, along with radiation treatments, but they shouldn't interfere with her triathlon schedule.

This fall, she plans to celebrate her recovery by traveling to Ireland and running the Dublin Marathon.

"Check back with me," Westmark said. "I bet I'll make it."

http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20 ... -treatment


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PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2010 11:46 am 
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Yoga can improve sleep for cancer survivors, study says

Yoga classes can help cancer survivors sleep better, according to a study released Thursday.
Two-thirds of cancer survivors have trouble sleeping, even two years after they've finished chemotherapy or radiation. Even more report persistent fatigue, says study author Karen Mustian of the University of Rochester Cancer Center, whose findings will be formally presented in June at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's annual meeting in Chicago.

The National Institutes of Health, which funded this study, has funded a number of studies to scientifically evaluate complementary approaches to cancer. In recent years, for example, scientists at the oncology meeting have reported that ginger alleviates chemo-related nausea, gingko relieves cancer-related fatigue, but that shark cartilage has no effect on lung cancer. Americans spend $34 million out-of-pocket each year on alternative or complementary approaches, according to a 2009 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Many researchers are in interested in yoga, as well. The University of Kansas Hospital is launching a study on the effects of yoga on atrial fibrillation, which can be triggered by stress.

Doctors don't know exactly why sleep problems are so common after cancer therapy, Mustian says. But she notes that some chemotherapy can damage cardiac muscle, leading to heart failure many years after treatment. It's possible that fatigue could be an early warning sign of heart damage, Mustian says.

Mustian says she was drawn to yoga because it's safe, non-invasive and involves no medication. And small, preliminary studies have suggested that it can improve sleep.

In her experiment, yoga didn't replace conventional therapy, such as surgery and radiation.

Researchers randomly assigned 410 people who had finished treatment to receive either their usual follow-up care or attend a 75-minute yoga class, twice a week, for four weeks. The classes included breathing exercises, meditation and postures used in the hatha and restorative schools of yoga, Mustian says. Patients had an average age of 54. About 75% had been treated for breast cancer.

After four weeks, cancer survivors who attended the specially designed yoga classes also were less fatigued and sleepy during the day than others, Mustian says. They rated their quality of life more highly than those who didn't take yoga, and they used fewer sleeping pills.

Because her classes used specific types of yoga, Mustian says she doesn't know if other forms of yoga — such as more aerobic versions or classes held in a very hot room — would also be safe or effective for cancer survivors.

Mustian's study will likely encourage many cancer survivors and doctors to try yoga for sleep problems, says Priscilla Furth, a professor at Georgetown's Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center.

But Douglas Blayney, president of the oncology society, says the study doesn't reveal which parts of the yoga course was most beneficial. Participants could have been helped by a combination of exercise, meditation and the social support provided by meeting with fellow survivors, he says.

Mustian says it's possible that yoga helped cancer survivors reduced anxiety and helped patients relax, lowering levels of stress hormones.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/201 ... 1_st_N.htm

[comment - personally I wouldn't rely on yoga as my sole form of exercise but it is safe]


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PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 6:27 pm 
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Exercise May Keep Cancer Patients Healthier During, After Treatment

ScienceDaily (May 20, 2010) — Breast and prostate cancer patients who regularly exercise during and after cancer treatment report having a better quality of life and being less fatigued, according to researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

"Using exercise as an approach to cancer care has the potential to benefit patients both physically and psychologically, as well as mitigate treatment side effects," says study lead author Eleanor M. Walker, M.D., division director of breast services in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Henry Ford Hospital.

"Plus, exercise is a great alternative to patients combating fatigue and nausea who are considering using supplements which may interfere with medications and chemotherapy they're taking during cancer treatment."

Dr. Walker will present a poster with the study's design and intervention methods June 7 at the 2010 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago. The abstract is now available online at www.ASCO.org.

To study how exercise impacts cancer patients, Dr. Walker and her colleagues at Henry Ford's Josephine Ford Cancer Center and the Henry Ford Heart & Vascular Institute developed a unique program called ExCITE (Exercise and Cancer Integrative Therapies and Education).

ExCITE works with patients who are receiving cancer treatment to create individualized exercise programs. Some patients come into one of Henry Ford's fitness centers to workout, while others have plans that allow them to exercise at home during various stages of their care.

The study group thus far includes 30 female breast cancer patients and 20 prostate cancer patients, all ranging in age from 35 to 80. All were newly diagnosed when they began ExCITE. The study followed the patients during treatment and for one-year following completion of cancer treatment.

Before beginning the exercise program, Henry Ford's Preventative Cardiology Division measured the patients' exercise capacity, skeletal muscle strength and endurance. General blood work, metabolic screens, bone density and inflammatory biomarkers also were obtained at the start of the program.

Exercise and diet recommendation for each patient were based on their baseline exercise tolerances, weight, overall health, and type of cancer treatment they would receive. Acupuncture was used for patients who experienced hot flashes, pain, nausea/vomiting, insomnia and neuropathy as the result of cancer treatment.

Cheryl Fallen of Gross Pointe Park, Mich., was undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer while she took part in the ExCITE program. Through a mix of exercise, acupuncture and good nutrition, she didn't experiencing some of the more common side-effects from treatment -- nausea, fatigue and trouble with memory.

"ExCITE offers cancer patients a way to holistically approach their cancer care by tailoring a specific exercise routine to fit the needs of the patient, whether it's rehabilitation after surgery, or to enhance circulation or improve the immune system prior to chemotherapy or radiation," says Fallen.

When her white blood cell count fell during chemotherapy, Fallen would work out at home using an exercise band or by walking outdoors. When she was well enough to return to the gym, her workouts consisted of using the exercise ball and treadmill, and doing other strength-training exercises.

"Overall, the program makes you feel better about yourself. It's a positive support for cancer patients, and I really think it's allowed me to be more productive during my treatment," says Fallen.

Study of the ExCITE program is ongoing, with Dr. Walker and her colleagues continuing to investigate the potential benefits of exercise for cancer patients.

Study funding: Josephine Ford Cancer Center, part of the Henry Ford Health System, and Mothers, Daughters, Sisters & Friends, a group dedicated to raising funds for breast cancer care and research at Henry Ford.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 213110.htm

[comment - anyone surprised by this? Of course, exercise is not necessarily preventative on its own]


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PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 6:30 pm 
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Most Older Long-Term Cancer Survivors Have Poor Health Habits

ScienceDaily (July 28, 2009) — A new study finds that most older long-term cancer survivors who are interested in diet and exercise actually have poor health habits. The study also reveals that those survivors who do exercise and watch their diet have improved physical health and quality of life. Published in the September 1, 2009 issue of Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the research indicates that greater efforts are needed to encourage elderly cancer survivors to live healthier lives.

More than half of the estimated 11 million cancer survivors in the United States are aged 65 years or older. There are relatively few studies looking at older cancer survivors' health behaviors, but evidence suggests that many older long-term cancer survivors have suboptimal health habits.

Catherine Mosher, Ph.D., of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City and colleagues reviewed data from a total of 753 older (aged 65 years or over), long-term (five or more years post-diagnosis) breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors to estimate the prevalence of poor health habits in this population. Participants were recruited through the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry, the Duke Cancer Registry, and self-referral. The study included telephone interviews to determine individuals' eligibility for a diet and exercise intervention trial. Interviews assessed exercise, diet, weight, and quality of life, including physical functioning and mental health.

The researchers found that older cancer survivors, all of whom were interested in a diet and exercise intervention study, generally had poor health habits. For example, they reported an average of only 10 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous exercise per week. This is far short of the national recommendation of more than 150 minutes of exercise per week. Also, only 7 percent met healthful eating recommendations set by national guidelines. Despite their suboptimal health behaviors, cancer survivors reported a level of mental and physical quality of life that actually exceeded levels typically found among older individuals. This may be explained in part by the study's design: investigators excluded survivors with significant health problems and functional limitations.

The study also found that interviewees who exercised more and had better dietary habits experienced better vitality and physical functioning. On the other hand, individuals who were obese had worse physical quality of life.

"Our findings point to the potential negative impact of obesity and the positive effect of regular exercise and a healthy diet on physical quality of life outcomes among older, long-term cancer survivors," said Dr. Mosher. "Only randomized clinical trials, however, can reveal whether lifestyle modification improves older, long-term cancer survivors' physical outcomes," she added.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 080549.htm


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PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 6:32 pm 
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Cancer Survivors Have Low Levels Of Physical Activity And High Levels Of Obesity

ScienceDaily (Apr. 21, 2008) — A new study reveals that many cancer survivors are inactive and obese, which may negatively affect the control of their disease. The findings, which come from a study of cancer survivors in Canada, show that a cancer diagnosis does not appear to prompt significant behavior change and that interventions to increase physical activity and promote better eating habits among cancer survivors are warranted.

Obesity and physical inactivity are known to be detrimental to health, and in cancer patients, studies have linked these factors to negative outcomes including disease recurrence, cancer-specific death and reduced quality of life. However, few studies have looked at the prevalence of physical activity and obesity in populations of cancer survivors.

To determine this prevalence and compare it to individuals without a history of cancer, Kerry S. Courneya, Ph.D. of the University of Alberta in Edmonton analyzed data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey consisting of computer-assisted interviews of more than 114,000 adults. Survey participants reported their cancer history, height and body weight (to calculate body mass index), and participation in various leisure time activities.

The study revealed that fewer than 22 percent of Canadian cancer survivors were physically active, with the lowest rates reported by male and female colorectal cancer survivors, female melanoma survivors and breast cancer survivors. Also, nearly one in five (18 percent) of cancer survivors was obese, and one in three (34 percent) was overweight with little variation among the cancer survivor groups. The authors concluded that Canadian cancer survivors have low levels of physical activity and a high prevalence of obesity that are comparable to the general population.

However, some differences were found between cancer survivors and those without a history of cancer. Prostate cancer survivors were more likely to be active and less likely to be obese than men without a history of cancer, and male skin cancer survivors were more likely to be active than their disease-free counterparts. Also, obese breast cancer survivors were less likely to be active compared with obese women without a history of cancer. "This finding is cause for concern because physical activity may be particularly important for obese breast cancer survivors," the authors note. Studies suggest that obese breast cancer survivors may particularly benefit from higher physical activity levels in terms of preventing disease recurrence and improving quality of life.

In light of their findings, the authors recommend that lifestyle interventions be implemented to increase physical activity and promote a health body weight among cancer survivors.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 072212.htm


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PostPosted: Mon May 24, 2010 7:02 pm 
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Exercise improves cancer patients' quality of life--study

Exercise as a regular part of a comprehensive care plan for patients with breast and prostate cancer not only improves their emotional outlook and quality of life, but also helps combat the profound fatigue and weakness they experience during cancer treatment, finds a new study.

People undergoing cancer treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy often complain of various negative effects such as loss of physical function, weariness, nausea, depression and anxiety.

According to experts, exercise enhances fitness and muscular strength and uplifts mood and self esteem, besides reducing the dependency on extra supplements to counter the side effects.

Lead author of the study, Eleanor M. Walker, MD, Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan stated, "Using exercise as an approach to cancer care has the potential to benefit patients both physically and psychologically, as well as mitigate treatment side effects.

"Plus, exercise is a great alternative to patients combating fatigue and nausea who are considering using supplements which may interfere with medications and chemotherapy they're taking during cancer treatment."

The unique program ExCITE

In order to evaluate the impact of exercise on cancer patients, the researchers developed a unique program called ExCITE (Exercise and Cancer Integrative Therapies and Education).

As a part of the program, experts worked with the patients receiving cancer treatments by designing individualized exercise ventures.

A group of about 20 prostate cancer patients and 30 breast cancer patients aged between 35 to 80 years were selected. Some of the patients opted for exercising at home, while others chose to go to Henry Ford's fitness centers.

At the start of the study, the endurance and exercise capacity, muscle strength, bone density, metabolic and blood samples were obtained of all the participants.

The same information was once again taken at the end of the study.

The diet and physical regimes were coordinated on the basis of stamina, exercise tolerances, weight, health and type of cancer treatment.

Acupuncture was advised for patients who experienced hot flashes, pain, nausea/vomiting, insomnia and neuropathy due to the cancer treatment.

The study tracked the patients’ exercise routine during treatment and for 1-year following completion of cancer treatment.

Observations by the researchers

The investigators noted that weariness, memory loss and nausea the common side effects linked to cancer treatments decreased significantly by regular exercises, while some reported experiencing no adverse effects.

Cheryl Fallen of Gross Pointe Park, Michigan, who took part in the ExCITE program stated, "Overall, the program makes you feel better about yourself. It's a positive support for cancer patients, and I really think it's allowed me to be more productive during my treatment."

The design and intervention methods of the study will be presented on June 7 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

http://www.themedguru.com/20100523/news ... 35523.html


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PostPosted: Mon May 24, 2010 7:09 pm 
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High-intensity interval training is twice as effective as regular exercise

(NaturalNews) Recent research is indicating that traditional approaches to exercise that involve spending hours in the gym every day may not be the best way to stay strong and healthy. Interval training, a high-intensity type of workout that was originally created for Olympic athletes, may actually be twice as effective as regular exercise, and it can be done in a fraction of the time.

Most people are familiar with workout regimens that claim to build strength and endurance in mere minutes a day. Though seemingly deceptive, there may be more truth to such claims than one would have originally thought, depending on the technique. A few minutes of strenuous exercise a couple days out of the week is actually more effective than spending an hour or two every day in the gym.

According to Jan Helgerud, an exercise expert at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, interval training is far superior to traditional exercise. She believes that everyday people should aim to do four, four-minute workout sets with three-minute recovery times in between. In order to maximize results and achieve optimal muscle response, these sets should be intense and somewhat straining to the body.

While formerly thought to be too extreme for the average person, interval training is emerging as the exercise technique of choice among many experts, thanks to recent studies showing that common people stand to benefit from it. Part of this research includes evidence that interval training can double a person's endurance, improve their body's use of oxygen, and increase their speed and strength.

Officials in both the U.S. and the U.K. typically advise people to engage in roughly two-and-a-half hours of moderate exercise a week in order to maintain proper weight and a healthy heart. Such recommendations, however, will do very little to improve fitness ability, strength, or endurance.

Adamson Nicholls, a 36-year-old martial arts enthusiast, explained in an interview that he was able to greatly improve his endurance by undertaking 45-minute interval training workouts once a week for six weeks. If he had been doing regular workouts, it would have taken him roughly three months to achieve the same outcome.

Stephen Bailey, a sports sciences expert at the University of Exeter, explained why better results can be achieved from interval training in a fraction of the time. "A lot of the [benefits] from exercise are due to a stress response. If you disturb your muscles, there's an imbalance created and your body will start signaling pathways that result in adjustments," he explained.

In other words, moderate workouts may be longer than interval workouts, but they do not push the body hard enough to elicit an effective muscle-building response. Short, high-intensity workouts actually convert existing muscle fibers into ones that absorb oxygen more efficiently and effectively, helping people to burn fat, build muscle, and improve overall strength.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028851_inter ... rcise.html


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PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 8:54 am 
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Lack of exercise 'worse for health than being obese'

Dr Richard Weiler, a specialist registrar in sport and exercise medicine, said that a lack of fitness was the root cause of more illness than body fat.

This ill health includes diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, mental health problems and high blood pressure, he said.

He called for public health policies to focus more on increasing physical activity and that spending huge amounts of money on treating obesity was the wrong way forward.

Weight loss drugs and surgery both carry risks and their long-term benefits are limited, he warns in an opinion piece published in the British Medical Journal.

A recent review of the evidence “suggests that cardiorespiratory fitness, which is developed and maintained by regular physical activity, is a better predictor of mortality than obesity,” Dr Weiler, from Imperial College Healthcare Trust, in London, writes.

More than nine in 10 people in Britain do not take the recommended 30 minutes of moderate exercise five days a week.

His article which says that health policy should focus on physical activity rather than obesity, adds that health problems “can be greatly reduced by physical activity leading to improved fitness – even in the absence of weight loss.”

However, writing in the same journal, Prof Louise Baur and colleagues from the University of Sydney, say that while physical inactivity is a “major contributor “ to disease it would be wrong to focus on exercise and ignore obesity.

Meanwhile, a new survey shows that one in five children say they do not get any support from their parents to play sport outside school.

And half of boys and 15 per cent of girls saying they would play more sport if their parents were prepared to drive them to sports clubs, the poll, of 1,000 children and 2,000 parents by David Lloyd Leisure showed.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healt ... obese.html

[comment - makes some good points, however I am proof that exercise alone can't overcome a poor diet and other risk factors. Combine exercise with eating at least five different veges a day and we begin forming the start of where we need to be]


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