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PostPosted: Sun Oct 19, 2014 10:22 am 
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Kids who drop out of sport are more likely to suffer mental health problems, University of Wollongong study reveals

ABOUT 250,000 children drop out of organised sport each year — and it’s not just their physical health that suffers but their mental health too.

A new study by University of Wollongong found children who abandon organised sport between the ages of 8-10 are up to 20 per cent more likely to develop serious mental health problems before they reach high school.

The study, presented at the Sports Medicine Australia convention in Canberra on Friday, also revealed the dropout rate at this age is rising by 10 per cent each year.

The study’s lead author Dr Stewart Vella, of the university’s Early Start Research Institute, said: “Clubs, coaches, parents and health practitioners should look out for kids experiencing psychological difficulties who drop out of sport.”

“While we were expecting our results to confirm the negative psychological consequences of dropping out of organised sport, we were surprised by the magnitude of the differences, with the total relative increase of risk in mental health problems within three years for kids who drop out between 10 to 20 per cent,” Dr Vella said.

Mum to four boys aged from 10-15, Lucy Cook, says the cost is a big factor in children dropping out of sport.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/n ... 7094934308


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2014 5:00 pm 
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GPs win mental health award

WHEATBELT GP Network is the winner of the John Da Silva award for improved outcomes in Aboriginal social and emotional wellbeing for this year.

The Mental Health Commission co-ordinates the Good Outcomes Awards as an annual event.

This year's gala awards evening was held on October 7 to coincide with mental health week and saw 160 people in attendance at the University Club of Western Australia.

There were 12 awards announced, but being recognised for commitment to Indigenous mental health is of special significance to the Wheatbelt GP Network.

In 2010, Wheatbelt GP Network opened Wheatbelt General Practice Aboriginal Health.

The practice works in close partnership with Wheatbelt Aboriginal Health Services to deliver culturally appropriate primary health services that meet the needs of Aboriginal people in the Wheatbelt.

There are practices in Northam and Narrogin employing nurses and reception staff. The service is complemented by an Indigenous outreach worker, Indigenous health project officer, care co-ordinator and community re-entry program officer.

Together, these three positions work with general practice and Aboriginal people throughout the Wheatbelt to overcome barriers and facilitate improved communication.

Health education and improved self-management is of particular importance.

The third aspect of the network's commitment to Indigenous primary health, is a counselling (mental health) service.

A clinical psychologist visits Wheatbelt Aboriginal Health Service regularly to counsel patients and streamline the GP referral process.

There has been a significant increase in referrals for counselling in the past year and clients are actively engaging with the psychologist.

The network's success at connecting with patients is largely due to the partnership with Wheatbelt Aboriginal Health Service and in having programs that complement one another to facilitate real health outcomes.

The network's Indigenous health programs are made possible through funding from the Commonwealth Department of Health and are part of the Indigenous chronic disease package indicator under the Closing the Gap initiatives.

Acting chief executive Melissa Deegenaars expressed her gratitude to Wheatbelt GP network staff.

"We are lucky to have quality staff that share the Network's vision of improving the health of Aboriginal people," she said.

"I congratulate the staff on making this award possible and am excited about the future for Indigenous health care in the region."

Aboriginal people seeking primary health care are encouraged to contact Wheatbelt General Practice Aboriginal Health by phone on 9690 2824 or go to wheatbelt.com.au.

http://www.avonadvocate.com.au/story/26 ... d/?cs=1517


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 23, 2014 1:49 pm 
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Here's How To Actually Stick To An Exercise Plan, According To A Famous Psychologist

Winter is coming.

The morning jog that you dutifully developed over the past few months is about to be put to the test.

Instead of the bright summer sun meeting you in the morning, you’ll be greeted by the relentless autumn wind.

Yet you know that fitness has tremendous effects on at-work performance, since you read about how marathon-running CEOs lead companies valued 4% to 10% higher than CEOs who don’t run marathons.

But running in the cold is way less fun, so how can you protect that habit?

We consulted Walter Mischel, the Columbia University psychologist whose work has helped psychological science understand how self-control predicts success.

I told him that my editor made a special request for our interview — she wanted to know how she could keep running even when things got blustery.

Mischel, author of “The Marshmallow Test: Mastering Self-Control,” said the first step is understanding what’s going on.

“What is happening is that the pleasure value of jogging is going down and the effort value and the discomfort value of jogging is going up,” he said. “She has to ask herself, ‘How much is this really worth to me?’”

If it is worth the while, the next step is implementing an “if/then” plan.

“She has to heed the delayed consequences,” Mischel said. “When it’s 7 a.m. and the alarm rings, I put on my warmest jogging clothes, and I go.”

And if that pattern is put in place every morning, it becomes a normal part of the day.

“If she’s serious about it, then she makes an if/then plan,” Mischel said. “It’s like jumping in the shower, even though you don’t feel like it — it’s automatic.”

http://www.businessinsider.com.au/how-t ... an-2014-10


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 25, 2014 12:06 pm 
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Heat brings warning from health body

RIVERINA residents received a preview of the summer to come with the temperature soaring in the past two days.

Wagga experienced its hottest days of spring on Thursday and yesterday, with tops of 34 and 33.9 degrees respectively.

The hottest October day on record was set in 2006 when the mercury hit 36.3 degrees.

While there was no record breaking temperature, the Murrumbidgee Local Health District is warning residents of higher temperatures to come.

Acting public health director Alison Nikitas said heat-related illnesses could affect anyone, but people over 75 years old, infants, children and people with a chronic medical condition were more at risk.

"Heat can put a lot of strain on the body and can cause dehydration, heat exhaustion and heat stroke," she said.

"It can also make underlying health conditions worse.

"However, being prepared and taking some simple precautions can reduce the risk of heat-related illness," Ms Nikitas said.

In preparation for the bushfire season, Riverina Local Land Services (LLS) hosted bushfire management training at Marrar.

The training will also allow LLS staff to use prescribed burning activities on travelling stock routes and reserves.

"Fire will be used as another management tool to control areas of noxious weeds or to facilitate the recruitment of native pastures," land services manager Mike Dunn said.

http://www.dailyadvertiser.com.au/story ... ody/?cs=12


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2014 11:18 am 
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Heart Foundation wants cycle scheme

Half of all workers would ride a bicycle to work if they were paid to do so, research suggests.

The Heart Foundation and Cycling Promotion Fund says its survey shows a national ride-to-work scheme would be positive.

They're calling on the federal government to set up an incentive scheme, similar to ones that already exist in Europe.

Boosting bicycle use would improve people's health and reduce Australia's health-care cost, the foundation says.

"Currently inactivity is responsible for 16,000 premature deaths and costs the Australian economy $14 billion every year," says the Heart Foundation's director of cardiovascular health, associate professor Trevor Shilton.

Of the 2000 Australian workers surveyed, all of whom currently don't ride to work, 50 per cent said they would cycle to the office if they were offered some kind of financial benefit.

Up to 80 per cent of respondents supported the implementation of a cycle-to-work plan, regardless of whether they would ride to work themselves.

Several countries including the UK, France, the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany and Belgium have bicycle schemes for workers, with different kinds of incentives, such as payments per kilometre, tax breaks and financial support for buying bikes.

If implemented in Australia, a mature scheme of subsidies and tax breaks was estimated to cost the government about $15 million over five years in forgone revenue.

Only one per cent of Australian workers cycle to work, compared to 66 per cent who drive, says Prof Shilton.

"There are no easy answers to reversing the lack of physical activity in all our lives, but with lack of time cited as the biggest barrier, supporting people to get their daily dose of exercise on the way to work would be a big step in the right direction."

THREE RIDE-TO-WORK SCHEME IDEAS

* Direct subsidy: employee paid set amount per kilometre to ride to work, based on French model.

* Indirect subsidy: employers receive tax refund for employees who cycle to work, which is then paid to the employee. Several European examples.

* Tax deduction for purchase - tax concession for purchase of a bike (value normally capped at $1500) for riding to work. Possible savings of 30-40 per cent. Based on UK model.

http://www.9news.com.au/health/2014/10/ ... cle-scheme


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2014 7:26 pm 
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New Research Shows Your Body Clock May Influence How Many Drugs Work

Every time our planet goes through its 24 hour rotation, aspects of your internal chemistry swing through cycles of change – in your brain, your liver, your heart and your fat cells. Timing is so important to living things that there’s a whole field – chronobiology – devoted to studying it.

Now, scientists are claiming that 56 of the 100 top selling drugs directly bind components of that day-night dance. The drugs include everything from Ritalin to Nexium, Viagra to forms of cancer chemotherapy. The implication, said lead researcher John Hogenesch, is that the time of day these drugs are taken may influence efficacy and potential for side effects.

The research, done at the University of Pennsylvania and published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, used mice, but the researchers say it is relevant to humans because circadian clocks are so deeply rooted in life on Earth, affecting not just animals but plants, some fungi and even bacteria. Mice are somewhat reversed from humans, becoming active at night and sleeping in the day, but both species show profound changes over a 24-hour cycle, said Hogenesch. And we and mice use roughly the same molecular mechanisms for keeping time.

He said that while sunlight can reset our circadian clocks, our bodies also depend on internal timekeeping devices, or “endogenous clocks,” which keep many living things on a rhythmic schedule even when subject to 24 hours of light or of darkness. One active area of research is trying to understand how these internal clocks work, said Hogenesch.

“How do you get a biological clock out of proteins and lipids?” he said. “We know how we make a watch but we don’t really know how we make a biological clock.”

The University of Pennsylvania has long been a center for studying the influence of time on the living world, with much of the research using fruit flies. Like us, fruit flies need their sleep. Back in the 1990s, Penn scientists found that when they kept flies in perpetual darkness and monitored their activity with strategically placed motion sensors, they found the flies kept a regular schedule, suggesting they must have built-in clocks.

The first circadian rhythm gene, called “per” was found in flies by Seymour Benzer, a famous fly researcher at Caltech. Penn researcher Amita Sehgal and colleagues suspected there were others, and by inducing various mutations and testing the sleep schedule of their flies, they found a gene called “tim”.

Flies with damage to the tim gene didn’t sleep at all, which may sound appealing if not for the fact that these flies didn’t live long. The two genes, tim and per, seem to work together to create a chemically driven internal clock. The genes orchestrate the production of two proteins that bind together and accumulate, then disintegrate over a 24-hour cycle.

The research published this week focused on a different question – how these timing mechanisms influence the rest of an animal’s biology. Their approach was to look for cyclical patterns in the way the messages these genes hold get transcribed – how their recipes are turned into proteins. The researchers found that 43% of mouse genes showed activity patterns tied to the day-night cycle, with two physiological “rush hours” of high general activity before dawn and dusk.

Many of these genes showed cyclic behavior in some organs but not others, said Hogenesch. The scientists looked at adrenal glands, aorta, brain stem, brown fat, cerebellum, heart, hypothalamus, kidney, liver, lung, skeletal muscles, and white fat. The researchers also found circadian rhythm influenced parts of the so-called noncoding parts of the genome – the stretches of DNA that don’t make up genes.

Then they decided to examine how many of the bestselling drugs interact with “targets” that oscillate on a 24-hour cycle. They found 56 of the top 100 bestselling drugs did in fact target parts of our oscillating physiology, and that included all seven of the top sellers. Hogenesh suggested that timing may be an underappreciated factor in the way many drugs work, especially since a good portion of those drugs have half-lives under 6 hours.

It’s already obvious that time of day matters for sleeping pills, he said, and there’s research showing that statins work best before bed time because they target an enzyme that peaks at night. But in the case of chemotherapy, he noted there’s a body of work showing that timing of administration can matter a lot, but that’s rarely followed in practice.

The findings don’t necessarily mean we’re all taking our drugs at the wrong time. But he hopes the data his team collected in the study could help others consider the influence of time and the cyclical processes that are etched so deeply into our biology.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/fayeflam/20 ... rugs-work/


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 8:32 am 
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Get up, get out, get healthy

When it comes to our health, one valuable resource is being overlooked: the outdoors. Fresh air, sunshine and room to move all have a significant impact on our health. Now, research is showing that in our digital age we’re spending an increasingly small amount of time soaking in the benefits of spending time outside.

The benefits of spending time outside – even just sitting and watching the scenery – are vast. Research shows that benefits of time outside, particularly for children, include:

Increases fitness levels, which builds active healthy bodies while reducing the risk of obesity
Raises levels of Vitamin D, which protects kids from future bone problems, heart disease, diabetes and other health issues
Improves distance vision and lowers the chance of nearsightedness
Effective in reducing ADHD symptoms and increasing concentration
Reduction in stress levels
Protects emotional development, including a decreased risk of anxiety and depression
Enhances social interactions and strengthens the value of community and close relationships

St. Mary’s Hospitalist Dr. Alex Kendziorski wholeheartedly believes in taking advantage of the health benefits nature provides. He believes that making an effort to spend more time outside is vital to our health.

“Apart from the proven physical and mental health benefits, there are intangible advantages to spending time outdoors. In an increasingly isolating and compartmentalized digital age, individuals can become truly cut off from family, friends, society and nature itself in exchange for concentrated entertainment,” he says. “The links are severed and kids are less likely to understand their place in a natural system and get to know how their behaviors affect the environment.”

While it may sound daunting if you’re not already accustomed to spending lots of time outside, Dr. Kendziorski said spending more time outside doesn’t have to be a huge effort.

“In a busy schedule, small bite-sized activities are best to start with. Hiking in the arboretum or in one of our state parks is great for allowing the day’s stress to melt away, but adding an element of hunting keeps the kids involved,” he said. “For example a scavenger hunt works well if you know the landmarks or if you find ways to draw wildlife into your yard and observe their behavior.”

In fact, you don’t even need to move around much to reap many of these benefits. Try finding a great view to enjoy or even just heading out for a relaxing picnic lunch at the park. While a leisurely stroll or an afternoon appreciating the view doesn’t offer the same cardiovascular benefit a strenuous hike does, it still offers a great opportunity for stress relief.

Don’t forget that time spent outside isn’t just limited to daylight hours. Dr. Kendziorski’s family enjoys stargazing, which is becoming easier with reasonably priced telescopes and apps for smartphones and tablets like Skyview.

“For my son, I like to research what we will experience so there are plenty of fun facts at the ready when needed,” he said.

Another easy activity is to compare the scale of things with a landscape measuring wheel. You can compare the distances between cities, the solar system or the sizes of the largest animals on Earth. The most important part is simply being outside.

If you’re looking for unique ways to get outside, try planning an event or vacation around outdoor activities. Instead of planning a birthday party or family gathering for an indoor attraction, check out state and local parks as a low-cost option. For your next vacation, check out a national park or area that offers interesting activities like cave exploration or wildlife reserves for hiking and observing animals in the wild.

“So much of our time is spent in office cubicles under the sickly glow of fluorescent lighting,” said Dr. Kendziorski. “Spending time outdoors has become a need rather than a luxury.”

These are just some of the benefits of spending time outside. For more information on the benefits of spending time outside, check out our online section Time for Kids: Explore the Outdoors.

http://www.channel3000.com/health/Get-u ... y/29427214


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 02, 2014 9:20 am 
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How To Get Fit Without Exercising

The BBC’s Trust Me I’m A Doctor series used activity monitors to measure the activity levels of eight volunteers. Ideally, those volunteers would be doing 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise a week, measured via an MET (Metabolic Intensity of Task) score. To qualify as moderate intensity, a score of three or more is needed.

In the study, it turns out that vacuuming and mopping both scored above three, as did washing windows, planting flowers, washing the car and mowing the lawn. If you’re regularly performing those chores, you’re reducing your risk of heart disease and obesity.

To be honest, that’s quite a big if — while the volunteers claimed to spend 72 minutes a week on those outdoor activities, very few people plant flowers or wash windows every week. However, it’s a reminder that keeping moving is valuable for your health. Hit the link for full details of the study.

http://www.lifehacker.com.au/2014/10/ho ... xercising/


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 12:51 pm 
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The scariest thing about not exercising

What's scarier than a little goblin' knocking on your door for some treats? Not being able pick that goblin up for some love when you notice it's your grandchild. What's scarier than a cold wintery night? Not being able to go outside because you suffer from circulation problems. What's scarier than falling? Not being able to get up. What's scarier than eating witches brew? Not being able to cook your own. What's scarier than a werewolf on a full moon? Not being able to take your favorite pet for a walk. What's scarier than the great pumpkin? Not being able to carry your pumpkin in from the car. What's scarier than living in a haunted house? Not being able to live in your own.

There are so many things that are scary when it comes to health and fitness. Ok, not really. There is nothing scary about the benefits of health and fitness. What is scary is what we do to ourselves by not exercising. Originally this article was written after a member had shared with me his story of recovery after a terrible accident. I remember him saying to me "the scary thing to think about is where I would be if I didn't exercise," reminding me of the most important benefit that exercise provides; increased protection during an unexpected accident, slip or fall.

The spookiest part of all is that most people don't do anything to correct bad health habits and behaviors that would potentially haunt them for the rest of their lives. We live in the here and now. Not having time, being too busy and not understanding that the body and the behaviors that we practice today are determining how we'll be in the future. The costume we've put on and are deciding to wear can affect so many things in our future.

Just last week I was on-line looking up motivational "quotes" that I could use to decorate the school bus taking our Cross Country Runners to their State Meet. While looking for quotes on why running is so great, I found a quote from Edward Stanley (who was the Earl of Darby in 1873), "Those who think they have not time for bodily exercise will sooner or later have time for illness." That was pretty cool to find a quote from the 1800s saying the same thing that we still preach today.

Since today is Halloween, I wanted to use the theme and remind you that only you have the power to unlock the ghosts of your health and begin taking charge of a healthier and not scary you.

Exercise can do these things for you. Where are you now with your exercise program? Where will you be in 10 years if you don't start exercising now? What has exercise allowed you to continue to do in your life that hasn't benefited one of your non-exercising friends? These are all spookily awesome questions.

Did you know that people who exercise live an average of 3 months in a debilitative state prior to death? That is compared to those who are active (but don't do regular exercise) living in a debilitative state for 3-6 years. Finally, those who do nothing can live their last 10 years of life in a debilitative state. That is scary.

It's scary that people don't think about the future. We all want to live for now. I'm too busy. I'm going to wait until my kids start school. I can't start until. I'm too old. You know as well as I that there are no excuses for not taking care of yourself. That means today, tomorrow and in 10 years. I don't care how old you are, you can start now.

Your body needs to move. If you do not move it on a regular basis you are setting yourself up for prolonged years of needed assistance. Yes, someone will have to take care of you. That is the scariest thing of all. I hope to see you at the gym.

http://www.eptrail.com/estes-park-colum ... exercising


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 5:12 pm 
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Gym smog: Poor air quality could be killing your workout

As you huff and puff your way through your Body Combat class, cardio or weights sesh at your gym, you're probably (deservedly) giving yourself an internal high five for maxing your health.
But unfortunately a bit of killjoy research might halt that back-patting in its tracks.

Turns out gyms are havens for nasty air-borne pollutants that could be detrimental to your health. So while you're working on your six-pack, your cells might be screaming "mercy".

Portuguese researchers put air-quality monitors in 11 gyms' weight rooms and exercise studios when they were most crowded and found levels of airborne dust, formaldehyde and carbon dioxide exceeded most accepted standards for indoor air quality.

They found the air was particularly polluted in aerobics classes because lots of people were packed into small studios, which meant dust and fumes from carpet, cleaning products, furniture and paint were disturbed.

"Athletes and the common individual can be at risk when they are practicing exercise in polluted environments," said study author Carla Ramos, a graduate student at the University of Lisbon.

Past research has found that people who exercise in high traffic areas that cause them to inhale exhaust have a higher risk of heart disease — even if they're otherwise very fit, and now it seems that gyms don't always offer a safe haven from polluted environments.

Ramos said the presence of chemicals, such as formaldehyde, was alarming because high quantities can cause respiratory problems and asthma.

"When we exercise, we take in more air with each breath and most of that air goes through the mouth, bypassing the natural filtration system [in the nostrils]," Ramos said.

"The pollutants go deeper into the lungs compared to resting situations."

On top of that, lots of heavy breathing during exercise can cause high levels of carbon dioxide in the rooms, which can elevate exhaustion and make us feel foggy.

Be alert, not alarmed

Ramos was quick to point out that this research doesn't mean we should all abscond our gym memberships (in case you were looking for an excuse).

Instead, consider how clean your gym is and how fresh it smells – chemical or stale smells can be a signal of poor air quality.

Ramos suggests chatting to your gym manager about whether the building has undergone an indoor air quality assessment, and also find out if the floors are mopped – this will pick up more dust than simply sweeping.

The air we breathe

Indoor air quality is high on the agenda of health authorities, with the US Food and Drug Administration ranking indoor air pollution as one of the top five environmental risks to public health. The CSIRO estimates that poor indoor air quality in Australia costs the government about $12 billion a year.

Most of the focus on indoor air quality is on places where we spend a lot of time, such as offices, classrooms, public transport, homes, hospitals and shopping centres.

Australia has no specific laws for indoor air quality, apart from workplace guidelines.

Fitness First and Fernwood Fitness were unavailable for comment.

The study will be published in the journal Building and Environment.

http://health.ninemsn.com.au/fitness/89 ... ur-workout


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 12:11 pm 
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8 ways to get your daughter exercising

1. Set an example
Your daughter will not believe exercise is important if you don’t do any yourself. Set an example: if you exercise then she will want to do it too. A good – and enjoyable – way to do it is to play sport together as a family. You could make it a routine and do something like cycle to school with your daughter every day, or it could be a less prescribed activity, such as a spontaneous game of tennis or volleyball in the garden.

2. Make exercise a family event
Though team sports are great if your daughter enjoys them, I think it’s particularly important to encourage children into sports fundamental for their wellbeing that can be practised throughout life, such as running or yoga. Practise them together: I have a laugh with my girls doing yoga poses and we often all go for a run with the dog.

3. Find role models
Nothing will inspire your daughter more than seeing women play sport live. At the moment Britain has so many world-class women’s teams, including rugby, football and cricket. My eldest daughter saw the British netball team play and came back dreaming of being in their squad. These women make good role models – they have healthy, muscular bodies – and seeing them in action will show your daughter you have to sweat and work hard to stay in shape.

4. Mix activities up
Variety keeps exercise fresh. Take your daughter to different classes while she is still young and enthusiastic, and see which ones stick. Inspiring teachers are crucial, whether the class be Tae Bo, spinning or kickboxing. Dancing is a fun option because of the music – all little girls want to dance like their favourite pop star.

5. Make sport social
Sport becomes less cool when you hit 11, 12 or 13 so, as your daughter gets older, encourage her to make sport part of her social life. If I told my eldest daughter, who is 14, to go for a run on her own she wouldn’t, but she becomes much more enthusiastic when her friends are involved.

6. Help them feel the part
Not being good at sport or not looking the part can become massively important to girls when they reach their teenage years, which is also the age that they become body-conscious and want to look good. Non-competitive sports that focus on health and fitness such as aerobics, yoga or Pilates are good options for shy teen moments. Cool leggings are a fun and feminine alternative to a football kit or school sportswear that will help your daughter feel good and inspired to work out.

7. Keep it fun
Incorporating sport into a holiday is always fun. My daughters are lucky and go skiing once a year, but also enjoy swimming in the sea and paddle-boarding in Cornwall on holiday.

8. Limit screen time
My children earn screen time: half an hour spent exercising or reading a book grants them half an hour’s computer or television time. Be strict: this behaviour can become addictive and your daughter can’t limit herself

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens ... ising.html


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2014 11:29 am 
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Cardio workout fact vs. fiction

(CNN) - What 's your favorite exercise? If you love doing cardio, great! But, be warned, it might not be all it seems. What do we mean?

Well, first of all, if you think cardio is the only way you are going to lose weight, think again.

Now, we know losing weight is a numbers game. Calories in must not exceed calories out. If you add in weight training to the cardio exercise, you'll build lean muscle, and that will help boost your metabolism and burn more fat.

And speaking of building muscle, just because you ran or biked doesn’t mean you can skip leg exercises. In order to get that metabolic burn in the legs, you are going to need to do things like squats, leg lifts or even lunges.

Do you think you have to work out for an hour in order for cardio exercise to be effective? You don't.

Doctors say any cardio exercise is good for you and your heart. Not only will you burn calories fast, but you are likely to burn calories for up to 38 hours after the workout because you have revved up that metabolism.

But no matter what you do, doctors say getting up and getting moving is essential to good health.

http://www.kshb.com/news/health/cardio- ... vs-fiction


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2014 2:26 pm 
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'For me, exercising is a love/hate relationship'

Do you exercise regularly? If so, what do you do?

Being a dancer, exercise plays a really important role in my life. As a freelancer I don't have the luxury of a consistent company class, so my training is entirely my responsibility. I do yoga, I run in winter and swim in summer. I also try to take ballet classes when I can.

Do you do it willingly or begrudgingly?

It is a love-hate relationship. There are days when my body craves exercising. There are days when I'm tired and I have to push myself to do it. And there are days that I really don't want to do it and I don't do it.

What time do you go to bed?

I usually go to bed at 11.30. If the next day is going to be long and tiring I try to go to bed earlier.

What time do you get up in the morning?

This period of my life, due to the fact I'm studying (I'm studying part-time for an Art and Design Foundation Diploma in London) and working at the same time, I have to wake up at 6.15 to work for college before going to rehearsal. Otherwise, I wake up at 7.0-7.30.

What do you have for breakfast?

Currently for breakfast I enjoy vanilla yogurt with banana, blueberries, goji berries and flax seed. I also have a butter croissant and a cup of earl grey.

Lunch?

For lunch I might have a salad with spinach, tomatoes, peppers and feta cheese with olive oil.

Dinner?

For dinner, an option is salmon fillets in the oven with grilled asparagus, mash potato and quinoa.

Any snacks?

For a snack I usually enjoy a slice of carrot or chocolate cake, a milk chocolate bar, any kind of nuts, dried fruits, apples and strawberries, and salt and vinegar potato crisps.

Do you take any supplements?

If I'm going through an intense and stressful period of rehearsals and performances, I take vitamin C, iron and wheatgrass.

How much water do you drink?

Two litres per day.

Do you have a skincare routine?

I generally use a good face wash and a good moisturising cream twice a day - in the morning and before going to sleep.

Any allergies?

No.

Any vices?

I smoke occasionally.

If I could change one thing about my lifestyle it would be …?

I would take a long walk to the park and not stay in front of my computer when I have a day off.

Neither Either runs at The Project Arts Centre until November 15.

http://www.independent.ie/life/health-w ... 26647.html


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 1:27 pm 
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Location: Australia
Why women gain weight after exercise

Most people believe that exercising regularly will result in weight loss, but many people find that they end up putting on more weight in the form of fat, not muscle.

This can be attributed to some people eating more while engaging in physical activity, but for others who eat the same, there hasn’t been an answer.

Now, scientists have sought to discover the why exercise can lead to weight gain.

A new study, by Arizona State University's school of nutrition and health promotion, which was published last month in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, looked at 81 sedentary but healthy women in their 30s who were overweight.

"Aerobic exercise training in women typically results in minimal fat loss, with considerable individual variability," the authors said.

"We hypothesised that women with higher baseline body fat would lose more body fat in response to exercise training, and that early fat loss would predict final fat loss."

All the participants had their BMI, body fat, weight and measurements recorded before being put on a three-month supervised exercise regimen which involved walking on a treadmill, at a fast pace, for 30 minutes, three times a week. They were also advised not to change their eating habits.

After 12 weeks, some women remained a stable weight, while others lost weight. But 55 had put on weight – some up to 4.8 kilograms.

Dr Glenn Gaesser, the study's lead author, told The New York Times that someone wanting to lose weight should weigh themselves after four weeks of exercise because the study's participants who were losing weight after four weeks of exercise tended to continue to lose weight, while the others did not.

He also said if you didn’t see results after that period of time, you should "look closely at your diet and other activities".

The women in the study were found to be much fitter after four months of exercise.

"Fitness matters far more for health than how much you weigh," Dr. Gaesser said.

http://www.aww.com.au/diet-health/fitne ... r-exercise


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2014 1:05 pm 
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Olympic swimming champions Dawn Fraser and Duncan Armstrong want Swimming Australia to clean up the sport

TWO of Australia’s most legendary swimmers Dawn Fraser and Duncan Armstrong say it is time for Australian swimming to address its dark secret and to protect children under its care.

Olympic freestyle champion Armstrong said the time is now to help those that may have suffered in a shameful past that goes back decades.

“We have had some disappointing moments in Australian Swimming that we have not addressed,” Armstrong said. “Within swimming circles there are well-known stories and incidents that have been bandied around for decades and have not been addressed and I hope sooner rather than later people who have harmed these swimmers are brought to justice.”

Fraser said it is a “disgrace” that the Queensland Academy of Sport (QAS) has not acted to increase child protection since the sexual abuse allegations were levelled at Olympic coach Scott Volkers in the Royal Commission into Institutional Child Sex Abuse.

The Royal Commission recently revealed the QAS did not have and still does not have a child protection policy that deals with complaints of sexual abuse.

“[Abuse] should not take place, it is just not to happen, if Australian swimming have covered it up, well they shouldn’t, they should be looking into it now.”

Olympic champion Shane Gould last week wrote in The Sunday Telegraph that victims of inappropriate behaviour should be located and helped “no matter what the cost”.

Gould also said any further inquiry into swimming must be conducted by an independent organisation, not the Australian Sport Commission or a service contracted by sporting organisations.

Fraser believes the Swimming Australia and Australian Coaches and Teacher’s Association, who control the accreditation process, should employ more stringent education procedures to ensure the protection of athletes.

USA Swimming currently ensures their coaches are put through rigorous “Athlete Protection Training” and have all coaches have a monthly criminal background check.

“I agree with what the Americans do, we should adopt that system, and make sure the coaches are doing the right thing by our young women and men, boys and girls,” Fraser said.

As little as three years ago Volkers was invited back to give a keynote speech at the Australian Coaches and Teacher’s Association conference on swimming techniques.

The late Terry Buck, who was accused of sexual abuse by Olympian Greg Rogers, has a lecture named in his honour at the ASCTA conference.

Rogers nominated 29 other victims to police, including other Olympic swimmers, two surfing champions and three men who committed suicide before investigations began. Buck died in a tractor accident in 2005.

http://www.news.com.au/national/nsw-act ... 7124194030


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