Brain Tumour Survivor

A site dedicated to leading edge treatment for brain tumours
It is currently Thu Nov 15, 2018 6:22 am

All times are UTC + 10 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 122 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 8:23 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Prom queen arrested for sick joke

A TEXAS prom queen who raised more than US$17,000 after telling classmates she was dying of cancer has been arrested.

Angie Gomez, 19, told her family, friends and fiance in January 2011 that she had six months to live after battling leukemia since childhood.

The Horizon City teen set up her own charity foundation, called "Achieve the Dream," and raised US$17,000 ($16.300) from fundraisers, cheques, gift cards and in-kind donations, the El Paso Times reported.

Ms Gomez claimed that her condition caused her to miss her senior prom, and so Da Vinci High School held another in her honour in June 2011 - the same month police received a complaint that Ms Gomez did not appear to be ill.

A long-running investigation revealed that the hospitals Ms Gomez said had treated her held no record of her as a patient.

She was finally held on Friday at her place of work after a warrant was issued, Detective Liliana Medina said.

Ms Gomez's lawyer, Sheldon Myers, told KVIA, "She has a real soft spot for people that suffer from those types of diseases, and that's why she was trying to get money for them."

Mr Myers insisted that the teen did suffer from leukemia and cancer as a child and had good intentions for the money.

Officers said that the teen's mother told them she did not realise the extent of her daughter's fundraising and believed Ms Gomez was trying to "straighten out the matter," the El Paso Times reported.

Ms Gomez was jailed, with bond set at US$50,000.

http://www.news.com.au/world/prom-queen ... z1soJGKeVM


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2012 6:51 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
NY woman admits faking cancer in wedding scheme

GOSHEN, N.Y. — A New York woman admitted Wednesday that she faked cancer to con donors out of money and services for her wedding and Caribbean honeymoon.

Jessica Vega, 25, isn't likely to do any time in state prison, court officials said, but will have to repay $13,368 to her victims and remain in jail until her sentencing May 15.

She pleaded guilty in Orange County Court to scheming to defraud and possession of a forged instrument charges.

In 2010, Vega spread the word in her Hudson Valley community that she was dying of leukemia and wanted a "dream wedding" to Michael O'Connell, the father of her infant daughter, in the few months she had left.

Donors stepped up with rings, an embroidered wedding dress and a time-share in Aruba for the honeymoon. Other contributions included food, wine and hairdressing.

Vega was living in Montgomery, a town 60 miles north of New York City, when she launched the scam, which picked up steam when her story was featured in a local newspaper, the Times Herald-Record of Middletown.

But after their May 2010 wedding, O'Connell came to the newspaper with questions about her story and the couple divorced.

The forged instrument charge involved a bogus doctor's letter that Vega gave the newspaper to bolster her story.

She was arrested April 3 in Virginia, where she was again living with O'Connell.

"By pretending to have a terminal illness, Vega inexcusably took advantage of the community's hearts and minds," said Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, whose office prosecuted the case. Now, he said, "she will be held accountable for fleecing the public through lies and deception."

Vega is expected to be sentenced to time already served in jail as long as she pays the restitution.

Her lawyer didn't immediately return a message left for him Wednesday afternoon.

http://online.wsj.com/article/APd9e8a1d ... a5520.html


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2012 6:58 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Cancer survivor gives winnings to charity

A US doctor who survived two brain tumours has donated all his winnings from his appearance on Who Wants To Be A Millionaire to funding medical research into cancer.

North Carolina man James Perri, 40, was first diagnosed with a brain tumour as a 24-year-old medical student but was able to beat the cancer only for a second tumour to develop in the same place years later, the Charlotte Observer reports.

When he was declared cancer-free for a second time in April 2010, the emergency room doctor vowed to do something to help others suffering from oligodendroglioma, the rare type of brain cancer.

"I was looking to give back to the cause," Dr Perri said.

"There’s no guarantee the way they've treated it that it's not going to come back. "I want something that definitely cures it."

With that attitude Dr Perri and his wife Nancy established Operation Oligo Cure, a non-profit organisation dedicating to raising awareness of oligodendroglioma and ultimately finding a cure.

In November last year Dr Perri appeared on game show Who Wants to be a Millionaire and pledged to donate all his winnings to Operation Oligo Cure.

In the episode, which goes to air on Monday in the United States, Dr Perri won US$15,800 ($15,195). He could have taken home even more but he came unstuck on a tough question about a Soviet dissident and an American magazine.

The question that halted Dr Perri's charity drive was "Before it started running lighter fare what magazine's debut issue featured the writing of Soviet dissident Alexander Solzhenitsyn?"

The answer was People magazine.

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/world/845826 ... to-charity


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 7:38 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
More Bad News for Komen: Vice President Biden Will Skip D.C. Event

As the Susan G. Komen foundation gears up for its most high-profile event of the year, its Global Race for the Cure in Washington, Vice President Joe Biden will not be hosting a kickoff barbecue for the annual D.C. race, as he and his wife, Jill, have done in previous years.

Meanwhile, U.S. Congressman Mike Honda, who formed a team for the race last year that raised more than $10,000—making him the top fundraiser on Capitol Hill—told The Daily Beast that he will not be participating this year, linking the decision to Komen’s move to cut funds to Planned Parenthood earlier this year amid pressure from Catholic bishops.

The Komen foundation quickly reversed its Planned Parenthood decision amid a backlash, but it has struggled since then, with some Komen affiliates around the country reporting declines in participants at spring races and other fundraising events.

The Bidens cited a scheduling conflict for their decision not to host the kickoff party at their home for the June 2 event.

Rep. Honda’s office was critical of Komen, saying that while the congressman “supports the Susan G. Komen foundation’s vital work,” he also “believes that Komen must act to rebuild trust with all its partners,” according to communications director Jack d’Annibale. “Komen must act to ensure its work benefits all women. Congressman Honda was the first member of Congress to call on Komen to reverse its Planned Parenthood decision, and he will remain vigilant for any attempt to use partisan politics to derail the urgent mission to defeat cancer and protect the health of women everywhere,” d’Annibale said.

The Komen foundation said it remains “very optimistic about the race,” according to Leslie Aun, Komen’s vice president for communications. “The numbers are lower than where we were last year at this time, but typically what happens is that in the days leading up to the race, we close the gap.” Aun, who will be leaving her post at Komen this month to join a D.C. group called Venture Philanthropy Partners, added, “Fewer dollars mean fewer women we serve, and that is really sad. Lots of women in D.C. need the funds Komen provides. This is about the women and our communities.”

At last year’s Washington race, nearly 40,000 people participated, with 45 congressional offices forming teams. The event raised more than $5 million, according to the Komen foundation. Seventy-five percent of funds raised at community races stays in the local community, going to screening for treatment and women, according to Komen. The other 25 percent goes to research.

“Just this week, someone at a local lesbian health organization for women with cancer told me she wished people knew what we do for them,” Aun says. “We’re their largest grantee.” She added, “We hope people continue to support Komen for the right reasons. It is not about politics—it is about breast cancer. To politicize breast cancer is wrong. There are too many women at this moment who are counting on us to help them in their fight. Everything else is noise and nonsense.”

In the 30 years since the Komen foundation was launched, it has raised some $1.9 billion for cancer research. More than 100,000 volunteers work in a nationwide network of affiliates. It was all the vision of Nancy Brinker. A former U.S. ambassador to Hungary, she created the charity after her sister, Susan G. Komen, died of breast cancer in her mid-30s.

In the wake of the Planned Parenthood flap, Komen canceled its annual lobbying day in D.C., at which activists push for government programs, not for Komen programs—raising concerns that the controversy could have wide-reaching effects on women’s health. Separately, Komen’s New York City affiliate postponed two spring fundraisers amid concerns about participation. Affiliates from Florida to Arizona have reported declines in race participants and funds. Dana Curish, the executive director of the Central Indiana affiliate, said her recent race had 27,126 participants, down from 37,450 last year. “Right now our fundraising dollars are also down about 28 percent,” she said, “but fundraising stays open until May 21, so we still have time to change those numbers and are offering incentives.”

Not all affiliates attribute declines to the Planned Parenthood issue. Miriam Ross, the executive director of the Komen affiliate in Southwest Florida, said fundraising was down around 10 percent at her group’s race—to $850,000—but that she believes the downturn was due to seasonal factors. “We live in a tourist area that is dependent on seasonal residents. This year was the warmest winter in decades, and that had an effect on the number of seasonal tourists that typically come down from January to April,” she said. She added, “We had more than 10,000 attendees at the race this year. We have a tremendous amount of support from the local community and over the past 10 years have been able to fund programs totaling $5.7 million. These local grants fund education, screening, and treatment for those people in our community who have nowhere else to turn.”

Aun, the Komen spokeswoman, stressed the importance of support from local communities. “We know people have been upset. We’ve made mistakes, and we’ve apologized,” she said. “We’re trying to move forward in the best way we can. We cannot do that without the support of the local community. Our local community in D.C. is Congress.”

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2 ... event.html


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2012 7:26 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Arizona Woman Fakes Breast Cancer, Spends Funds on Implants

Jami Lynn Toler, a 27-year old Arizona woman, told people that she had breast cancer. After successfully raising a bit more than $8,300, she handed over the money to a plastic surgeon, who performed "a standard boob job."

Toler told her cancer story to her family and co-workers, saying she would need a double mastectomy and immediate reconstruction, as treatment for her breast cancer. Apparently she did not consult an oncologist nor a general surgeon, and has not had a breast biopsy. She wanted a breast augmentation - not a double mastectomy - and since she had no insurance, turned to Hallmark Hospice for help with fund raising and participated in several events that provided more than the $7,800 that she originally requested. When medical records showed that she had never had cancer and had indeed used the funds for non-medically necessary cosmetic surgery, she was arrested and charged with fraud and theft.

Will Toler get to enjoy her new curves from behind bars? Or will she have to surrender her implants? Perhaps she will have to repay the funds that she fraudulently obtained, as well as serve some time for pretending to have a deadly disease and receiving funds as a result. And, I wonder what she told her plastic surgeon before the augmentation procedure - make me look expensive?

Cancer fraud is a nasty exploitation of caring people who are willing to give money to help others who claim to be fighting a life-threatening disease. In previous cases, such as Brian Bonniwell - faked male breast cancer, and Ashley Anne Kirilow - faked treatment side effects by self-mutilation; these frauds played on the sympathies of people who gave up their time, money, goods, services, and sympathy. Even worse, people who fake cancer in any way are hurting those of us who actually do suffer from cancer - any type of cancer - and need help with bills. Cancer treatment is very costly and insurance doesn't cover 100% of the expenses. Many people don't have health insurance, which makes a cancer diagnosis a double disaster. Burned once or twice by a cancer faker, generous everyday people may never help with fund-raising again. That's what hurts survivors most - the betrayal of public trust creates an atmosphere of skepticism that makes many of us hide our wallets when somebody cries "I have cancer!" Those patients and their families who are genuinely in need may suffer because of the cancer fraud perpetrated by folks like Toler, who wanted money for breast implants - not breast cancer. For shame! Enjoy the curves, Jami Lynn, and hope to Heaven that you never really do get breast cancer - because in young women, it can be very very aggressive.

http://breastcancer.about.com/b/2012/05 ... plants.htm


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2012 7:12 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Operation Smile's cancer cure claims ‘deceptive' - court

A COMPLEMENTARY medicine clinic that claimed it could cure cancer had misled and deceived consumers, the Victorian Court of Appeal has found.

Operation Smile describes itself as a complementary medicine centre specialising in the treatment of cancer.

Links on its website described cancer treatments available at its Hope Clinic including photo dynamic therapy, oxygen therapies and high-dose intravenous Vitamin C, the court heard.

Consumer Affairs Victoria took the company to the Supreme Court, alleging its statements were falsely representing its treatments as effective in treating cancer and having scientific support.

But that court found that, while Operation Smile did not have the support of conventional science, its statements were not misleading or deceptive.

It was determined that readers of the clinic's statements would understand them as mere expressions of opinion and as claiming no support from conventional medicine or science.

The Court of Appeal today disagreed.

Chief Justice Marilyn Warren and Justices Geoffrey Nettle and Anthony Cavanough found the company's statements that treatments at its Hope Clinic could cure, reverse, stop or slow the progress of cancer were misleading or deceptive or likely to mislead or deceive.

It was also misleading or deceptive to represent that such treatments were evidence-based therapies, supported by published research findings or supported by generally accepted science, the court found.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/breaki ... 6352965587


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2012 7:39 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Racers unite against breast cancer amid mixed feelings about Komen

Five years ago, as soon as her breast cancer treatment ended, Mindy Saifer Cohen put on the pink.

She e-mailed everyone she knew, asking if they’d walk in her name at the annual Race for the Cure. By that first race day, Team Mindy was already a juggernaut.

About 120 people marched by her side to raise money for the cause — so many that they won an award from the race’s organizer, the Susan G. Komen foundation, for assembling the largest entrant in the event’s friends and family division.

They won the next year, and every year after, raising more than $30,000 for Komen.

“Everything we did was Team Mindy,” says the Elkins Park mother of three daughters.

This bring us to January, when the enormously successful nonprofit found itself needing the services of an expert in crisis communications.

Its board in Dallas had voted to stop funding Planned Parenthood. The initial explanation was technical — a Florida congressman was investigating the organization, which in addition to offering breast-health services provides abortions.

Cohen was headed to a race cook-off when she learned of the controversy. She told her supporters that in good conscience she could no longer participate in fund-raising. Team Mindy collapsed.

So what drew her to the Art Museum steps again on Sunday, draped in pink?

“To me,” she said, “the race is always about survivors.”

And so she found herself standing with 6,000 sisters in triumph, women like Diane Miller, a 65-year-old retired teacher from East Torresdale, who never considered pulling her support from Komen. “It’s been so important to me,” the breast-cancer survivor said.

Cohen wore sunglasses, as she does each year, because emotions overwhelm her when the other women tell their stories — what it was like when they learned of their diagnosis, how they are holding up now. They meet at the museum, and descend triumphantly as one, and at the end, they say “Same time, same place next year.” It is powerful.

For Cohen, 46, the funding flap was more than a PR disaster. Asked to describe herself, she begins with her diagnosis, the treatment, the recovery. Her feelings about abortion rights solidified in college when a friend who chose to end her pregnancy had neither the money nor a ride to the doctor’s office. Cohen was there to support her friend walk past the protesters.

“I had a car. I picked her up,” Cohen said. “I believe in this.”

So do I. My mother was an abortion counselor. She spent 30 years helping women make the most difficult decisions imaginable.

Once the last of her kids was out of the house, she volunteered at Pregnancy Counseling Service in Boston, helping women find safe treatment in New York clinics. The day in 1973 after the U.S. Supreme Court decided Roe v. Wade, my mother was hired by the Crittington-Hastings House, where in the operating room she held the hands of Radcliffe students and public health-service clients, women who were stoic, teary, resolute, distraught.

I asked Mom, now 84, about the emotional drain of her work, and we talked about how my having premature twins made me wince at the thought of ending a life.

“Yes,” she said. “It’s not a frivolous decision.”

With participation in the races down across the country, Komen is working to regain its supporters’ trust, Elaine Grobman, its local CEO, told me. She said the national directors made a mistake. She asked that I not be negative about the organization.

“In your conscience, remember: You have the power to save womens’ lives, and when people are negative, the only people they hurt are the women who need their help.”

I mentioned this to my mother, who for years donated to Komen. She replied, “I’m giving direct to the American Cancer Society this year.”

Cohen says she will likely go back to raising money for Komen, eventually. But she’ll no longer try to be the biggest team or win any awards. “I see Komen going very corporate now, and not as much about survivors,” she said. “And that’s a shame.”

http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20120 ... Komen.html


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 7:53 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Perfect 10 for charity effort

THE morning teas of Romilda and Mario Amorosa are as big as their hearts.

Yesterday they held their 10th morning tea to support cancer care, research and prevention, welcoming friends and strangers to their West Hobart home.

And the couple's serious fundraisers have now passed the $150,000 mark. Mrs Amorosa does much of the cooking for the event, passing out cakes, biscuits, scones and rum balls with a reputation that's spread far and wide.

Much of the money is raised through her baking all year long, providing biscuits sold through shops and pizza sold to friends.

Raffles and auctions, aided by donations from businesses and individuals, all boost the coffers.

This year Cancer Council Tasmania hopes to raise $350,000 from Australia's Biggest Morning Tea events around the state.

More than 800 hosts have been registered, holding teas in workplaces, schools and homes.

May 24 is the official tea party day, but events can be held any time in May or beyond.

http://www.themercury.com.au/article/20 ... ories.html


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2012 5:56 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Eat pink for a good cause

Hot cross buns have come and gone – now it’s time for pink finger buns.

As part of a national effort to raise $1.2 million for Breast Cancer Network Australia (BCNA), Bakers Delight outlets across the Surf Coast and Bellarine will donate 100 per cent of the sale of their pink finger buns up until May 23.

Australian track champion and breast cancer survivor Raelene Boyle has jumped on board as an ambassador for the Pink Bun fundraising campaign. She said this year’s campaign is particularly exciting as Bakers Delight customers will also be funding the development of a new booklet, which aims to educate women with breast cancer about the importance of keeping active.

“BCNA hears from the women within our network that keeping active after breast cancer can be very daunting. The support of Bakers Delight means BCNA is able to develop this new booklet so more women can improve their well-being through exercise after a breast cancer diagnosis.”

The booklet will offer practical tips from women within the BCNA network about keeping active, as well as input from clinical experts to ensure the information is relevant and reliable.

Maxine Morand, BCNA chief executive and a breast cancer survivor herself, said that more than 14,000 Australian women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during 2012.

“We greatly appreciate the enthusiasm and support that Bakers Delight bakeries across Australia provide BCNA,” she said.

“Seeing the lengths that bakeries go to in support of women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer is truly inspirational.”

The fundraising campaign has been running since May 3 and as well as selling pink buns, Bakers Delight staff and stores will be dressed in pink with collection tins available on the counter for one-off donations.

http://www.surfcoasttimes.com.au/news/c ... ood-cause/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2012 7:13 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Time for a cuppa

IT’S that time of year again; time to enjoy a cup of tea and a slice of cake for a great cause.

May is the month for the Cancer Council’s Biggest Morning Tea.

Across the country, in workplaces and schools and everywhere in between, people are getting together for a morning tea to help raise much needed funds for cancer research.

View our events calendar for all the Biggest Morning Tea Events in the region, or to add your own event

The Skillset Lithgow branch got in early, holding their morning tea last week in conjunction with the award ceremony for Apprentice, Trainee and host business of the year.

The team baked up a storm, resulting in a table of delicious food for award winners, business representatives and staff.

Skillset’s fundraising contribution will go towards the Cancer Council’s $11.5 million goal for 2012; $300,000 more than 2011.

For any businesses or individuals wanting to hold a morning tea to help raise money for this fantastic cause, head to http://www.biggestmorningtea.com. au for more information.

Should you wish to have your Biggest Morning Tea advertised in the Lithgow Mercury, simply give us a call with all the details on 6352 2700.

http://www.lithgowmercury.com.au/news/l ... 61361.aspx


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2012 7:24 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
One in three fake ADHD

THE number of adults faking an attention disorder is increasing with about one in three patients fabricating symptoms to gain access to prescription drugs and other benefits, a Hobart conference has been told.

Dr Danielle Florida, from the Langton Centre in Sydney told the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Congress, that rates of the condition Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder had doubled in the past 20 years.

"Benefits of an ADHD diagnosis can include avoidance of work, social security benefits, evasion of criminal prosecution, substance abuse, academic test allowances and neurocognitive enhancement," she said.

"Australia has the fifth highest rates of Ritalin (a common ADHD drug used internationally) users in the world."

"There is a rapid rise in non-medical use.

She said younger people being diagnosed with ADHD were generally from lower socio-economic backgrounds, but a growing number of 20 to 24-year-olds from higher socio-economic backgrounds were getting ADHD drugs to use as stimulants - particularly for studying purposes.

"Stimulants may enable people to stay awake all night," Dr Florida said. "However, the benefits for students faking ADHD are negligible."

Dr Florida said the number of university students faking to get access to ADHD drugs could be as much as one in two.

Dr Florida said diagnosis had been difficult but a number of new online tests could help to distinguish between legitimate ADHD sufferers and the fakes.

http://www.themercury.com.au/article/20 ... -news.html[/b]


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2012 8:23 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Ex-office manager pleads to charge related to cancer clinic that authorities say diluted chemo

An ex-office manager has pleaded guilty in what prosecutors say was a multimillion dollar health care fraud in which a cancer clinic gave patients diluted chemotherapy drugs and used old syringes on multiple people.

Dr. Meera Sachdeva, Brittany McCoskey and Monica Weeks were indicted last August on charges including conspiracy and witness tampering related to the activities of Rose Cancer Center in Summit.

Filings in U.S. District Court in Jackson show that McCoskey pleaded guilty on Thursday to one count of giving false statements related to health care matters. The charge is related to billings to Medicaid and Medicare that claim a physician was present during certain procedures.

Sachdeva established the clinic in south Mississippi in 2005. Authorities say workers watered down drugs and billed Medicaid, Medicare and insurance companies for more chemotherapy drugs than patients received. The clinic billed Medicaid and Medicare for about $15.1 million during the alleged scheme.

The Mississippi Health Department closed the clinic last year because of “unsafe infection control practices” after 11 patients were hospitalized with the same bacterial infection. The scare led officials to test nearly 300 cancer patients for infections such as HIV. The department has said none of the patients tested had blood-borne viral infections related to the clinic’s care.

However, a civil lawsuit claims at least one patient died about the time the clinic was shut down from HIV he contracted there.

McCoskey’s sentencing is set for Aug. 6. Her lawyer, George Lucas, had no comment on Tuesday.

The other defendants have pleaded not guilty and await trial.

Sachdeva has been held without bond since August because authorities consider her a flight risk. She is a naturalized U.S. citizen from India. Prosecutors said she often traveled overseas and has considerable assets, including bank accounts, in her native country, despite the seizure of about $6 million.

Weeks is free on bond. Prosecutors say she did billing for the clinic.

Their trial had been set for May 2, but was postponed. No new trial date has been entered in court records.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/ ... story.html


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2012 7:35 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Cancer Council donations stolen

Lynda Pearce’s Biggest Morning Tea fund-raiser turned sour on Sunday night when thieves took $100 worth of donations from her Rutherford store.
The offenders broke in through the back door of Outdoor Furniture Specialists and took the float worth $380 as well as the jar containing Cancer Council donations, which had been hidden in the back room.

She said she hoped the public would support her Biggest Morning Tea fund-raiser today between 10am and 11.30am at the front of the store to make up for the robbery and ensure the Cancer Council received the support they deserved.

“We’re lucky that they didn’t take the merchandise we have been selling for the morning tea,” she said. “It’s annoying that this has happened because they have taken money that other people have donated.”

This is the third break-in at the store in three years.

“The first time they took the whole drawer with the float in it, and the second time they took the float and a Buddha statue,” she said.“We only keep the float on the premises and I can’t claim what’s been lost under the insurance because my excess is $500 and it will only push my premiums up.”

People are encouraged to support the Cancer Council and attend or hold a Biggest Morning Tea in their home or workplace. The charity’s target this year is $11.5 million.

http://www.maitlandmercury.com.au/news/ ... 66929.aspx


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2012 5:47 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
City's $10k Biggest Morning Tea

If $5 can give a newly diagnosed cancer patient important support and information resources to help them through their cancer journey, can you imagine what the $10,000 raised at yesterday's annual Tea By The Sea in Wollongong will achieve?

An enormous amount, according to Cancer Council southern region manager Toby Dawson.

The theme of this year's Australia's Biggest Morning Tea fundraiser was that every cup counts. Yesterday, close to 300 counted when event founder Stefanie Gaspari, her family and JCI Illawarra staged what was arguably the largest Biggest Morning Tea event in NSW.

For Ms Gaspari the event has come a long way since she gathered 14 friends together at Diggies five years ago to have a chat and make a donation to cancer research.

Yesterday's event at the City Beach Function Centre enjoyed the support of more than 60 businesses that made all kinds of donations.

"This was by far the biggest and best tea party yet," she said.

"We broke records in terms of attendees and fundraising which exceeded our goal of $10,000."

Donations are still being made online so the final total won't be available until that closes at nsw.cancercouncilfundraising.org. au/teabythesea2012 in a few days.

But immediately after the Tea By The Sea the total was above $10,600 and climbing.

"This morning was a true reflection of the spirit of Australia's Biggest Morning Tea," Ms Gaspari said.

All the region's Biggest Morning Teas were important, she said.

http://www.illawarramercury.com.au/news ... 68371.aspx


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2012 7:18 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Australia's Biggest Morning Tea raises funds for Cancer Council

AUSTRALIA'S Biggest Morning Tea is back tomorrow, as thousands gather at events around the country to raise funds for the Cancer Council.
More than $100 million had been raised since the event began in 1994, and organisers were hoping to raise more than $11 million this year.

About 110,000 Victorians participated in 2011, raising more than $2.4 million.

A Victorian is diagnosed with cancer every 19 minutes, and 29 Victorians a day die from the disease.

Anyone can organise a morning tea for the Cancer Council in May or June. For more information, call 1300 656 585 or visit biggestmorningtea.com.au.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/more-n ... 6363880175


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 122 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next

All times are UTC + 10 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.056s | 11 Queries | GZIP : Off ]