Brain Tumour Survivor

A site dedicated to leading edge treatment for brain tumours
It is currently Tue Dec 11, 2018 10:41 am

All times are UTC + 10 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 378 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2012 5:49 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
CSG blamed for child health woes

COAL seam gas investigators have been sent in amid reports of children with nose bleeds and chronic headaches in a Queensland community.

Parents at a Tara residential estate, 300km west of Brisbane, have complained of two odours they believe are toxic gases coming from coal seam gas wells in the area.

They said some children have experienced nose bleeds and chronic headaches over the past three weeks since the odours became apparent.

Natural Resources Minister Andrew Cripps said the Queensland Government had sent in its LNG Enforcement Unit, which monitors CSG operators.

He said he was aware of the health concerns and it was something the Government was treating very seriously.

Anti-CSG movement Lock the Gate Alliance president Drew Hutton said he believed one of the gases was hydrogen sulphide related to CSG activity.

"Nose bleeds and headaches are symptoms of hydrogen sulphide," Mr Hutton said.

"When it gets to higher levels you can't smell it and that's when it's very dangerous; it can kill."

He said the gas commonly existed in coal seams and he believed it was escaping from CSG wells and leaking into the environment through aquifers or natural fissures.

But the interim director for the Centre for Coal Seam Gas Professor Chris Moran told ABC radio hydrogen sulphide was rare and he had only heard reports of it in central Queensland.

But Prof Moran said it was possible for CSG wells to be leaking gas.

"In some cases where you've got old wells or you have issues with the casing of a well not having full integrity, you can get migration of gas around infrastructure, particularly old infrastructure," Prof Moran said.

"In the US the majority of cases of where gas makes its way around the environment is because of old infrastructure."

http://www.news.com.au/breaking-news/cs ... z1wwyKww1L


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2012 7:42 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
New York City official defends "supersize" drink ban

WASHINGTON, June 7 (Reuters) - New York City's top health official on Thursday shot back at critics who have blasted the city's plan to limit the sale of oversized sugary drinks such as soda, calling beverage industry opposition ridiculous.

The proposed ban, which caps most sugar-sweetened beverages at 16 ounces and carries a $200 fine for vendors that do not comply, met immediate backlash from beverage companies and others who argue it is government overreach, but was lauded by public health experts.

"It's not saying 'no' to people. It's saying, 'Are you sure? Do you really want that?'" Thomas Farley, New York City's health commissioner, said. "It's sending people a message while giving people the freedom to drink as much as they want."

Speaking at an anti-soda conference in Washington, Farley said that drink makers are following the same play-book as tobacco companies that push back against government action aimed at protecting consumers from harmful products.

Coca-Cola Co and McDonald's Corp along with beverage industry groups have said consumers should be able to make their own drink choices and that sodas are not to blame for the nation's soaring obesity rates.

The industry has launched a wave of ads attacking New York City's plan, which New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced last week.

Sugary drink consumption may just be a part of the U.S. obesity epidemic, but the products are the largest single source of sugar in the diet and have a major impact on health, Farley said. Reducing obesity by just 10 percent in New York City would save about 500 lives a year, he added.

"It's ridiculous to say we shouldn't try something that's only going to solve a portion of the problem," he said at the event, which was sponsored by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a group that has long advocated against junk food.

American Beverage Association spokeswoman Karen Hanretty, in a statement, defended the group's response and said Bloomberg's proposal "has gone too far with a proposal that will do nothing to reduce the serious problem of obesity in America."

The city's cup size ban will be submitted June 12 to the New York City Board of Health, which will then vote on it after a three-month comment period. If approved by the board, the ban would take effect early next year.

The beverage industry is expected to spend massive amounts of money to fight it. Legal analysts have said drink makers face an uphill battle in the courts if they opt for legal challenges to block the effort.

Public health experts have embraced Bloomberg's plan and see it as an approach that could be applied in communities across the country.

Kelly Brownell, director of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University, said targeting sugar sweetened beverages makes sense because they offer empty calories with no nutritional value.

Another city's mayor, Michael Nutter of Philadelphia, told the conference that he has seen some progress from drink makers selling smaller sizes and low-calorie or no-calorie products, but that so far they are not owning up to their role in the nation's weight struggle.

"The industry needs to at least acknowledge that they are part of the problem," he said.

http://in.reuters.com/article/2012/06/0 ... 4L20120607


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:02 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
CT scans on children 'could triple brain cancer risk'

Multiple CT scans in childhood can triple the risk of developing brain cancer or leukaemia, a study suggests.

The Newcastle University-led team examined the NHS medical records of almost 180,000 young patients.

But writing in The Lancet the authors emphasised that the benefits of the scans usually outweighed the risks.

They said the study underlined the fact the scans should only be used when necessary and that ways of cutting their radiation should be pursued.

During a CT (computerised tomography) scan, an X-ray tube rotates around the patient's body to produce detailed images of internal organs and other parts of the body.

In the first long-term study of its kind, the researchers looked at the records of patients aged under 21 who had CT scans at a range of British hospitals between 1985 and 2002.

Because radiation-related cancer takes time to develop, they examined data on cancer cases and mortality up until 2009.

Brain cancer and leukaemia are rare diseases.

'Significant increases'

The study estimated that the increased risk translated into one extra case of leukaemia and one extra brain tumour among 10,000 CT head scans of children aged under ten.

Dr Mark Pearce, an epidemiologist from Newcastle University who led the study, said: "We found significant increases in the risk of leukaemia and brain tumours, following CT in childhood and young adulthood.

"The immediate benefits of CT outweigh the risks in many settings.

"Doses have come down dramatically over time - but we need to do more to reduce them. This should be a priority for the clinical community and manufacturers."

CT scans are useful for children because anaesthesia and sedation are not required.

This type of check is often ordered after serious accidents, to look for internal injuries, and for finding out more about possible lung disease.

Regulations on their use in the UK mean CT scans should only be done when clinically justified - and the researchers said their study underlined that point.

Professor Sir Alan Craft, a co-author and leading expert in child health, said: "The important thing is that parents can be reassured that if a doctor in the UK suggests a child should have a CT scan, the radiation and cancer risks will have been taken into account.

"There's a much greater risk of not doing a CT scan when it's suggested.

"This study will push us to be even more circumspect about using it. We have much stricter rules here about using CT than in the United States, for example."

Dr Hilary Cass, the president of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, said: "We have to take very seriously the link between repeated CT scans and increased risk of these cancers amongst children and young people.

"But with both tumours rare, the absolute risk remains low."

A Department of Health spokesman said: "The UK uses lower levels of radiation in CT scans than other countries.

"We also have clear regulations to ensure a CT scan is only carried out when clinically justified."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-18342867


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2012 7:22 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Hospital study probes risk drinking in rural areas

A new study has found almost 40% of patients at rural hospital Emergency Department (ED) drink at high or risky levels.

The study looked at the ED's in 20 rural and regional communities.

Associate Professor Anthony Shakeshaft from the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre said the drinkers are usually single men, in their 20s .

He said the study recommends that all ED patients be offered a screening for alcohol problems and follow up interventions if needed.

"Before we thought it was really just alcohol related injuries but this tells us that it's much more than that," he said.

"So they're really just the tip of the iceberg.

"There's also people turning up to the accident and emergency with all sort of illnesses and other health related problems.

"So we really think that it's a good place to do alcohol-based interventions."

The research suggested accident and emergency departments of rural and regional hospitals could be a good place to start tackling alcohol abuse.

Associate Professor Shakeshaft said and ED strategy of early intervention for problem drinkers, has been trialled with some success.

"We sent them feedback in the mail," he said.

"So anyone that was a risky drinker we sent them some feedback saying here's how much you drink in your community, here's how much other people like you in your community drink.

"So we could show them that they were drinking more than was the norm for their community.

"It cost us less than $6 per patient and it showed that it had the impact of reducing consumption amongst risky drinkers by about 12 standard drinks a week."

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-06-08/s ... ds/4060528


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 6:46 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
E- Cigarette in Demand

It seems that e-cigarette is the new trend these days among the people. Its popularity has grown to such an extent that even addicted smokers are giving up their cigarettes for it.

Celebrities, who used to hit Page 3 headlines for their chain smoking habits are now recommending e- cigarette. Not only in Hollywood, but e-cigarette has found its special place in Bollywood as well.

One of the Bollywood actresses, Sonam Kapoor said, “Smoking is seriously not good! There are electric cigs available now. A lot of my friends are using it”. Experts were of the view that these cigarettes are finding a place in normal daily routine of celebrities, as it helps to fulfill their urge of smoking and also does not let them to compromise on their health.

United States is one of the countries where e- cigarette has become quite a common thing. One of the e- cigarette users was of the view that the greatest advantage of it is that e-cigarette can be used everywhere, like in clubs, bars or restaurants. It does not contain harmful chemicals and smokes, so there is no risk to smokers as well as to a person, who is sitting next to him.

http://frenchtribune.com/teneur/1211664 ... tte-demand


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2012 6:46 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Lung disease could hospitalise 21,000

About 21,000 Australians are expected to be hospitalised this winter by an often undiagnosed respiratory condition.

And health experts say it is set to cost the health system nearly $78 million.

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) affects one-in-five Australians over 40 but, according to The Australian Lung Foundation, as many as half are unaware they have the condition.

Foundation Professor Christine Jenkins said this was due to COPD - which attacks the lungs and causes breathlessness - commonly being confused with other conditions like asthma or the flu.

Many people also attribute symptoms of COPD to poor diets, sedentary lifestyles and the long term effects of smoking, she said.

"Unfortunately people do have their own explanations which means they often don't go to the doctor to find out more," she told AAP.

Prof Jenkins is urging people not to ignore the symptoms and seek proper medical treatment.

"It's a destructive inflammatory lung disease ... It's really important if you are getting breathless to ask your doctor if you can have a breathing test."

In economic projections, released on Tuesday, the foundation said it expects 21,000 people to be hospitalised with the disease during June, July and August this year.

COPD is also predicted to cost the health system nearly $78 million - more per case than cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis or arthritis, the foundation said.

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=8481977


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2012 5:53 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Diesel fumes 'cause cancer'

DIESEL exhaust causes cancer, the World Health Organisation's cancer agency has declared, a ruling it says could make exhaust as important a public health threat as second-hand smoke.

The risk of getting cancer from diesel fumes is small, but since so many people breathe in the fumes in some way, the science panel says raising the status of diesel exhaust to carcinogen from "probable carcinogen" is an important shift.

"It's on the same order of magnitude as passive smoking," said Kurt Straif, director of the IARC department that evaluates cancer risks. "This could be another big push for countries to clean up exhaust from diesel engines."

Since so many people are exposed to exhaust, Mr Straif said there could be many cases of lung cancer connected to the contaminant.

He said the fumes affected groups including pedestrians on the street, ship passengers and crew, railroad workers, truck drivers, mechanics, miners and people operating heavy machinery.

The new classification followed a weeklong discussion in Lyon, France by an expert panel organised by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The panel's decision stands as the ruling for the IARC, the cancer arm of the World Health Organisation.

The last time the agency considered the status of diesel exhaust was in 1989, when it was labelled a "probable" carcinogen. Reclassifying diesel exhaust as carcinogenic puts it into the same category as other known hazards such as asbestos, alcohol and ultraviolet radiation.

Experts said new diesel engines spew out fewer fumes but further studies are needed to assess any potential dangers.

Experts in Lyon had analysed published studies, evidence from animals and limited research in humans. One of the biggest studies was published in March by the US National Cancer Institute. That paper analysed 12,300 miners for several decades starting in 1947. Researchers found that miners heavily exposed to diesel exhaust had a higher risk of dying from lung cancer.

Lobbyists for the diesel industry argued the study wasn't credible because researchers didn't have exact data on how much exposure miners got in the early years of the study; they simply asked them to remember what their exposure was like.

A person's risk for cancer depends on many variables, from genetic makeup to the amount and length of time of exposure to dangerous substances.

http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/brea ... 6393690483


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2012 6:20 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Diesel exhausts do cause cancer, says WHO

Exhaust fumes from diesel engines do cause cancer, a panel of experts working for the World Health Organization says.

It concluded that the exhausts were definitely a cause of lung cancer and may also cause tumours in the bladder.

It based the findings on research in high-risk workers such as miners, railway workers and truck drivers.

However, the panel said everyone should try to reduce their exposure to diesel exhaust fumes.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer, a part of the World Health Organization, had previously labelled diesel exhausts as probably carcinogenic to humans.

IARC has now labelled exhausts as a definite cause of cancer, although it does not compare how risky different carcinogens are. Diesel exhausts are now in the same group as carcinogens ranging from wood chippings to plutonium and sunlight to alcohol.

It is thought people working in at-risk industries have about a 40% increased risk of developing lung cancer.

Dr Christopher Portier, who led the assessment, said: "The scientific evidence was compelling and the Working Group's conclusion was unanimous, diesel engine exhaust causes lung cancer in humans.

"Given the additional health impacts from diesel particulates, exposure to this mixture of chemicals should be reduced worldwide."

The impact on the wider population, which is exposed to diesel fumes at much lower levels and for shorter periods of time, is unknown.

Dr Kurt Straif, also from IARC, said: "For most of the carcinogens when there is high exposure the risk is higher, when there is lower exposure the risk is lower."

There have been considerable efforts to clean up diesel exhausts. Lower sulphur fuel and engines which burn the fuel more efficiently are now in use.

The UK Department of Health said: "We will carefully consider this report. Air pollutants are a significant public health concern, we are looking at this issue as part of our plans to improve public health."

Cancer Research UK said employers and workers should take appropriate action to minimise exposure to diesel fumes in the workplace.

But director of cancer information Dr Lesley Walker said the overall number of lung cancers caused by diesel fumes was "likely to be a fraction of those caused by smoking tobacco".

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-18415532


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2012 7:48 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Older men eating better but still fatter

Older Australian men are eating more fruit and vegetables than their younger counterparts but are less active and subsequently fatter.

That's one of the findings in a new report examining the health of Aussie men.

The study, released on Friday, compares the health of indigenous, rural, poor, migrant and older males.

The median age for Australia's male population was 36 in 2010. Around 12 per cent of men fall into the "older" classification of being 65 or over.

And it appears by the time they've hit that age they're happier to eat their fruit and veggies.

Only 37 per cent of men aged 65 plus are at risk of inadequate fruit intake compared to 57 per cent of males aged 15 to 64, according to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report.

When it comes to not eating enough vegetables some 87 per cent of older men are at risk.

While that might sound bad it's much better than the 94 per cent of those younger than 65 who aren't getting enough greens.

But it's not all good news for the older folk.

Some 62 per cent aren't getting enough physical exercise (at least 30 minutes five days a week) compared with 57 per cent of the younger generations.

Men born overseas in English-speaking countries are more likely than Australian-born males to get enough exercise across all ages.

Some 48 per cent of English-speaking migrants are at risk of inadequate physical exercise compared with 58 per cent of Australian-born males - which is similar to migrants from non-English-speaking countries (59 per cent).

The death rate for all male migrants is 11 per cent lower than for Australian-born men.

But it varies according to country of origin. For example, the Chinese death rate is 43 per cent lower while it's 38 per cent lower for men born in India. It's 21 per cent higher for males born in Poland.

Men born overseas are generally less likely to smoke, drink excessively or use drugs.

In 2010 there were three million men born overseas living in Australia. That's 27 per cent of the population.

The migrants come from 200 different countries with the United Kingdom the largest contributor followed by New Zealand, China, India and Italy.

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=8484154


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2012 9:59 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Aussie men second most obese in the world

Australians are eating badly and getting fatter - but still 85 per cent rate their own health as good or better.

This disconnect between fact and fiction is revealed in the latest report card on the nation's health from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

Just 50 per cent of people consume the suggested two serves of fruit per day. Fewer than one in 10 eat the recommended five serves of vegetables per day.

And while we might be a nation of sports-lovers almost 60 per cent don't do enough physical activity.

As a result Australia has the second highest rate of obesity for males and the fifth highest for females.

One in four adults and one in 12 children are obese. That's more than three million people.

The proportion of the population suffering with diabetes doubled in the decade to 2007/08. Type 2 diabetes is linked to lifestyle factors and accounts for up to 90 per cent of all cases.

Yet some 85 per cent of Australians rate their health as good or better, according to Australia's Health 2012 released on Thursday.

The breakdown is interesting: 56 per cent of Australian say their health is very good or excellent, 29 per cent opt for good while just 15 per cent admit their status is fair or poor.

Happily, most Australians feel pretty good about their quality of life.

Some 83 per cent say they are delighted, pleased or mostly satisfied. Fourteen per cent have mixed feelings while just four per cent are miserable.

Australia has the sixth-longest life expectancy for males (at 79) and females (84) among similar developed countries.

Switzerland topped the list for boys (at 80) while Japan has the longest life-expectancy for girls (86).

Cardiovascular disease remains Australia's biggest killer accounting for 33 per cent of all deaths. But the good news is there's been a 78 per cent decline in deaths from heart attacks and strokes since the 1968 peak.

"Australia has relatively high death rates from heart disease, diabetes and chronic lung disease," AIHW director David Kalisch said in a statement.

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/health/84871 ... -the-world


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2012 6:28 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Australians are living longer but getting fatter, a new report says

AUSTRALIANS are living longer - but also getting fatter, eating badly and not doing enough exercise, a report card on the nation's health reveals.

Obesity rates continue to grow, with Australian men rated the second most obese in the developed world and women the fifth highest.

About three million Australians are obese - 25 per cent of adults and 8 per cent of children - with only 50 per cent eating the recommended two serves of fruit a day and less than one in 10 eating five serves of vegetables each day.

While we might be a sport-loving nation, only 40 per cent of Australians aged over 15 do enough exercise.

Australian Medical Association president Dr Steve Hambleton said the obesity figures were alarming.

"It's very disturbing. Australia is following the US trend and we've really got to turn it around to continue to increase the life expectancy," Dr Hambleton said.

"These statistics don't bode well for the future. They're great predictors of lifestyle diseases like diabetes, heart attack and stroke."

The Australia's Health 2012 report, compiled by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, showed diabetes levels more than doubled in the past 20 years - making up 4.1 per cent of the Australian population.

Up to 90 per cent of these cases were type 2 diabetes, usually linked to lifestyle issues including obesity, physical inactivity and an unhealthy diet.

Cardiovascular disease remained Australia's biggest killer, accounting for 33 per cent of all deaths, but 63 per cent of people who had a heart attack survived in 2009, compared with 47 per cent in 1997.

The report showed, while smoking rates continued to fall, alcohol was still a problem, with one in five people aged 14 and over at risk of "alcohol-related harm" during their lives.

Over a decade, the cost of health in Australia jumped from $72.2 billion to $121.4 billion in 2009-10 - 9.4 per cent of the total spending on all goods and services in Australia.

Australia has the sixth-longest life expectancy for men (79.3) and women (83.9) among other OECD countries, with Switzerland topping the list for men (79.9) and Japan for women (86.4).

The snapshot revealed rates of the sexually transmitted disease chlamydia had increased six-fold since about 1994.

Organ donations are increasing but still well below world standards. Kidney disease is increasing and a majority of children have been vaccinated.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/a ... 6405982841


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2012 5:44 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Obesity bites in adolescence: study

Obesity causes fewer health problems in toddlers but really starts to bite in adolescence, Melbourne researchers say.

But underweight teenagers are generally healthy, research by Melbourne's Murdoch Childrens Research Institute shows.

The study of 16,000 Australian children aged between two and 18 found that poorer overall health and special healthcare needs were linked to underweight young children, but such problems shifted to overweight and obese individuals in adolescence.

Physical health problems were largely absent in obese or overweight toddlers but started to appear from the age of six or seven, according to the study published on Wednesday in the International Journal of Obesity.

Lead researcher Professor Melissa Wake said obesity in preschoolers and young primary school children seemed to be more of a risk factor than a cause of health problems.

"What it also highlights is this period of time between the early onset of obesity, when young children don't really feel its full health-related effects, and adolescence, when obesity really starts to bite.

"What that tells us is that we do have quite a number of years in which to intervene to reverse that high weight," Prof Wake told AAP.

She said the study showed it was important to monitor any deviation from a healthy weight at all ages.

Prof Wake said researchers were surprised to find that underweight adolescents were among the healthiest in their age group.

The best mental health was experienced by children of healthy weight and the worst by obese children, the study found.

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=8490035


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 7:20 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
A calorie isn't a calorie: What one man learned from diet study

Researchers who study nutrition say it's hard to complete studies like the one published earlier this week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., which showed that, after weight loss, dieters' metabolism slowed more when they ate a low-fat, high-carbohydrate weight maintenance plan than it did when they stuck to a low-glycemic index plan or, especially, a low-carb plan (see a link to our story on the research in the related items at left).

One reason why it's so hard? Because it can be tricky making sure people stick to what can be very restrictive diets.

The JAMA study kept dieters honest by providing all of their meals and hospitalizing them for several days to take needed measurements. Michael Rogers, a research scientist at Children's Hospital in Boston who was one of the participants in the experiment, lost around 40 pounds during the study — and, by following the lessons he learned through the process, has kept the weight off. But even he found the process challenging at times, he said.

First, there was the hurdle of getting started. Rogers saw a flier seeking subjects for the study months before he got in touch with the scientists running the study, he said. The screening process was rigorous too, involving poking and prodding, and extensive interviews intended "to make sure you'll be a good guinea pig."

Then there was the food itself. Monday through Friday, Rogers reported to the study site, which was up the street from his own laboratory, to eat lunch and pick up a bag containing his dinner, a snack for the evening and breakfast for the next morning. Weekend meals were provided in bags distributed on Thursdays and Fridays.

"Sometimes the food was pretty good, and sometimes it was awful," he said. It took a while to get used to how little salt was in the prepared food — the researchers kept sodium to a minimum to make sure dieters' weight loss didn't come only from shedding retained water.

"The low-fat diet was one I would never want to do again," he said, remembering the gnawing hunger he felt after a meal that included a heaping portion of mashed potatoes with very little salt and no butter. "You would think that would be a ton of food, but I was hungry an hour later. Probably because you metabolize it so fast. There was no fat in there. You eat it, you metabolize it, you’re done, then you’re hungry again."

Rogers wasn't hungry on the low-carb diet, but he "had dreams about pizza and pasta." He felt best on the low-glycemic index diet, he said, which was heavy on complex carbs like fruits, vegetables and whole grains — a variety of foods that matched what he had eaten growing up, he added.

"I learned a ton by being on those diets," Rogers said. Now he's added steel-cut oats and brown rice to his regular diet. His wife, an enthusiastic baker, is grinding her own whole wheat flour and using it to make bread for the whole family. He's learned to be consistent and not to get derailed by small fluctuations in his weight that might result from too much salt or other factors in his eating.

"I am much more aware of how long food will stick with me," he said. "For maintaining weight, learning those things has made a huge difference."

http://www.latimes.com/health/boostersh ... 7906.story


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2012 8:06 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Obesity linked to lower levels of education: study

Almost half of the less educated Australians will be obese by 2025, a new study predicts.

The study looked at educational inequalities and the prevalence of obesity and showed the percentage of obese people with degrees, diplomas and secondary education would double between 2000 - the start of the study - and 2025.

The prevalence of obesity for those in the lowest educational group was expected to increase from about 23 per cent to 44 per cent, the study, led by researchers at Melbourne's Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, found.

For people with a university degree the figure was predicted to more than double from 14 per cent to 30 per cent, while for those in the diploma category obesity was set to rise from 20 to 39 per cent.

Associate Professor Anna Peeters, head of obesity and population health at the institute, said the increase in obesity was concerning.

The research comes after an Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report showed one in four Australian adults and one in 12 children were obese.

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/nationa ... z1zDrNonSD


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2012 5:42 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Cancer scandal lessons ignored

THE former Country Fire Authority chief officer who lifted the lid on the cancer scandal at Fiskville in the 1970s and '80s says the CFA has failed to learn its lessons about how to protect staff.

Brian Potter said he was disappointed that a new generation of firefighters was being put in danger at the training college.

"I'm surprised and saddened that the issues we faced in the late 1970s still appear to be continuing," he said. "They are putting people at as much of a risk as we were 30 years ago."

Mr Potter, who is battling cancer he believes he contracted because of his time at Fiskville, said more needed to be done to protect volunteer and career firefighters' health and safety.

The Federal Government passed the Fair Protection for Firefighters Bill in November. It allows firefighters compensation if they contract cancers commonly linked to their job.

They do not have to prove they contracted the cancer as a result of their work.

But the law applies only to ACT firefighters and those at airports around the country.

Mr Potter was denied compensation by the CFA and its insurer, CGU, last month, despite years of exposure to hazardous chemicals at the Fiskville site.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victor ... 6418424723


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 378 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26  Next

All times are UTC + 10 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.105s | 14 Queries | GZIP : Off ]