Brain Tumour Survivor

A site dedicated to leading edge treatment for brain tumours
It is currently Fri Sep 22, 2017 9:12 am

All times are UTC + 10 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 85 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 5:34 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Aussie researchers in bone breakthrough

Researchers from Melbourne’s Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre have discovered that breast cancer cells can switch off the interferon immune response enabling metastases to form in the bone.

Although the initial discovery was in mice, the team have also shown in over 800 patients that high expression of Irf7-regulated genes in primary tumours was associated with prolonged bone metastasis-free survival, the authors wrote in Nature Medicine .

In mice, restoration of Irf7 or administration of interferon led to fewer bone metastases and prolonged survival times.

http://www.oncologyupdate.com.au/latest ... eakthrough


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2012 5:19 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Robot aids surgeons in catheter procedures, helps avoid radiation

When we think about a heart operation, it’s only natural to be concerned about the risks faced by the patient. What is overlooked is that the surgeon often faces risks in the operating theater as well. All the modern surgical paraphernalia may make cardiac medicine tremendously more advanced than it was a generation ago, but some of that equipment uses radiation that can be very dangerous to be around ... and surgeons are around it a lot. To help alleviate this, Corindus Vascular Robotics of Natick, Massachusetts, developed the CorPath 200 System. It’s a robot-assisted catheter system for unblocking arteries that allows cardiac surgeons to operate from a protective lead-lined cockpit while carrying out cardiac stent and balloon procedures.

Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) is a surgical cardiac procedure used to repair or prevent damage to the heart due to blocked or damaged heart arteries. It does this by means of either a stent or a balloon inserted at the end of a catheter into a major artery, usually in the leg, and navigated up to the heart. A stent is a mesh tube inserted into a failing artery to reinforce it like putting braces on the wall of a mine tunnel. A balloon is what is sounds like - it is moved to the site of a blockage in a heart artery and inflated to push the blockage aside and improve blood flow.

PCIs are very successful and common. Over 95,000 procedures a year are performed in the United States alone. The only problem is that the procedure requires the use of X-ray imagers to monitor and control the catheter’s movement and the rest of the operation. With the surgeon sitting next to the patient, that’s a lot of radiation exposure. There’s already a means of radiation protection in the form of heavy lead aprons and jackets, but they don’t provide full protection and can cause their own health problems due to their weight.

CorPath 200

CorPath 200 takes its cue from the nuclear power industry. If it’s too dangerous to be around radiation, then stay away and let a robot do the dirty work. CorPath is the first robotic-assisted system for stent and balloon procedures. It allows surgeons to operate from a lead-lined cockpit in the same room as the patient, yet remain protected against dangerous exposure to X-rays.

In clinical trials, the cockpit reduced exposure of surgeons by 95 percent and there’s no need for traditional aprons

To operate the CorPath, the surgeon uses two joysticks, which control the catheter and other devices. There is also a bank of screens with which the surgeon can monitor the operation to enable extremely precise control of movements. However, the surgeon isn’t just running the robot like a video game. The system has a forced feedback feature that lets the surgeon “feel” the catheter as it’s inserted and moved through the artery.

Corindus announced on July 25, 2012 that the CorPath 200 received FDA 510(k) clearance to be used in PCI procedures.

“The FDA clearance of the CorPath System will truly change the way I am able to practice," said Joseph P. Carrozza, Jr. M.D., Chief of Cardiovascular Medicine at St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center in Boston. "As interventional cardiologists, we perform our procedures using X-ray guidance and are cognizant that throughout our careers we will be exposed to a high amount of radiation. In the past, we have relied on heavy lead aprons to protect us from radiation, but the physical stress of wearing these aprons can lead to back pain, fatigue and orthopedic injuries. Robot-assisted PCI procedures allow us to provide our patients with the highest quality of care working in an ergonomic position with robotic-assisted stent and balloon placements to restore blood flow.”

As to the future, Corindus is now looking at expanding the CorPath technology to deal with other vascular conditions, such as arterial problems in the arms and legs, neurological conditions and structural heart applications.

Doctors explain the CorPath 200 System in the video below.

http://www.gizmag.com/corpath-200-robot-surgeon/23492/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 5:49 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
New use of ultrasound to enhance cancer radiation therapy

TORONTO – In a world’s first, there is promising research that shows a new way to use ultrasound that makes radiation more effective at smaller doses for treating various cancers.

Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the method disrupts tumour blood vessels with microscopic bubbles or “microbubbles,” making the radiation treatments much more potent. By treating the “microbubbles” with radiation they resonate and this stimulates the blood vessels inside tumours.

Ultrasound is typically used for imaging. “Microbubbles” pass harmlessly through the body’s circulation system and are normally used as a contrast agent to allow ultrasound to detect cancers.

“Our findings indicate a real possibility for bigger treatment impact at lower radiation doses which would mean less toxicity for patients and potentially less treatments overall,” says Dr. Gregory Czarnota, the study’s lead investigator and scientist at Sunnybrook Research Institute.

According to researchers, the experiments within prostate cancer tumours that combined both ultrasound and microbubbles treatments were more effective.

[The method] “cuts off the blood flow to the tumour and you end up with 50 to 60 per cent of the tumour dead 24 hours later,” says Czarnota. “It means that radiation treatments become much more powerful. It also means that a very long course of radiation that lasts 35 treatments may be shortened to as few as five to seven treatments.”

Researchers say human clinical trials could be as close as 12 to 18 months away. They’re conducting pre-clinical studies of similar approaches for bladder and breast cancers and will publish data later this year.

http://www.globalsaskatoon.com/health/6 ... story.html


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2012 6:01 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Herbal cuppa a health boost

THE humble cuppa can boost your wellbeing in many ways, says nutritionist Teresa Boyce.
Tea has been used for centuries, not only for drinking pleasure but also in the treatment of many health complaints.

Herbal tea is not only made from the leaves of a plant but may also include the seeds, flowers or roots. Any of these components may be steeped in hot water and consumed. Herbal tea is caffeine-free and has many health benefits.

If you have ever wandered down the tea aisle of your local supermarket or health-food shop you would know the selection of herbal tea is huge - which can be overwhelming if you don't know what you are looking for.

Herbal teas to try

Peppermint: Commonly used to enhance digestion and soothe an upset stomach. Peppermint tea is often made from tea bags, however you can make it yourself quite easily. Snip a few leaves from a mint plant, place in a cup, then add boiling water. Let it steep for a few minutes.

Lemon balm: Perfect for those suffering from anxiety. It is useful for treating stress, depression and sleeplessness. It may also relieve digestive tract spasms and abdominal cramps.

Dandelion: The ideal liver cleanser and detoxifier. It is also a diuretic and helps with fluid retention. Dandelion tea has a mild flavour and is a green colour. Dandelion root can also be consumed as a warm drink. It has a stronger flavour and is dark brown. Dandelion root is often used as a coffee substitute.

Nettle: Useful for easing intestinal disorders, high blood pressure, arthritis and gout. Nettle tea may increase milk production in nursing mothers and can help prevent prostate problems in men. If you haven't drunk nettle tea before, start with one cup a day for a week, then increase to two or three cups a day.

Rosemary: A garden herb that acts as a circulatory stimulant and has a calming effect on digestion, benefiting intestinal cramps and colic. Rosemary tea is made by adding one teaspoon of dried leaves to one cup of boiled water. Steep for 10 minutes and strain.

Chamomile: An easy-to-drink tea that may soothe a child's stomach aches and pains. For adults, chamomile can help with insomnia, acting as a mild sedative. It may also relieve menstrual cramps.

Rose hip: The tea is derived from the edible fruits of rose plants. It is reddish-orange in colour and high in antioxidants including vitamin C. It is a good sugar-free substitute for orange juice.

Licorice: A sweet-tasting tea that has been used for centuries for a variety of health applications. Its soothing and expectorant properties make it suitable for lung and bronchial complaints or coughs and mucous congestion. Drinking it hot has the added benefits associated with inhaling steam and further soothes respiratory congestion.

Cinnamon: Great for regulating blood-sugar levels and managing sugar cravings. Cinnamon's effect on blood-sugar makes it the perfect tea for diabetics or those trying to lose weight. Cinnamon tea is available in tea bags or you can make it yourself with cinnamon sticks and boiling water.

Fennel: Has a flavour similar to licorice and is good for calming an upset stomach and indigestion. It can be useful as a slimming aid as it may suppress the appetite and reduce hunger. Crushed fennel seeds are most commonly used to make this tea.

Word of advice

While most herbal teas are considered safe for everyone, and body + soul naturopath Mim Beim says they can be consumed by pregnant or breastfeeding women, if you have any concerns, check with your healthcare practitioner.

Did you know?

Drinking black tea could boost your fertility. A US study found women who drank two cups of tea daily were 27 per cent more likely to become pregnant.

http://www.news.com.au/news/herbal-cupp ... z23vi5zfU4


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2012 7:08 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Radiating fears over diabetes in childhood cancer survivors

People who undergo pancreatic irradiation during childhood cancer therapy are at an increased risk for developing diabetes later in life, report researchers.

However, they are only at significant risk for developing the condition after the age of 20 years, highlighting the importance of long-term follow up of childhood cancer survivors, say Florent de Vathaire (INSERM, Paris, France) and colleagues.

The findings come from a retrospective analysis of questionnaires and medical records for 2520 childhood cancer survivors who were followed up for a mean of 28 years.

As reported in The Lancet Oncology, 65 of the study population developed diabetes.

Of the 888 patients who had not received radiotherapy, five (1%) developed the condition compared with 60 (4%) of 1632 people who did receive radiotherapy.

The relative risk for diabetes was 11.5 in patients who received a 10 Gy dose or more to the tail of the pancreas and this risk became greater with an increasing radiation dose of up to 20-29 Gy, after which the risk plateaued.

The cumulative incidence of diabetes at the age of 45 years reached 16.3% in patients who had received more than 10 Gy to the tail of the pancreas.

The radiation dose to other parts of the pancreas did not have a significant effect, a finding that can be explained by the fact that the concentration of islets of Langerhans is higher in the tail than in the body and head of the pancreas, says the team.

The researchers also found that children who were younger than 2 years old at the time of radiotherapy had a significantly increased risk for developing diabetes than patients who were older when they underwent therapy, with a relative risk for 2.1 versus 1.4 for 1 Gy of treatment.

"To our knowledge, this study provided the first estimation of a dose-response between radiation dose to the tail of the pancreas and the risk of subsequent diabetes mellitus," write Vathaire et al. "Our findings emphasise the need to test for glucose tolerance in all patients with a history of abdominal radiation therapy to enable the early detection of diabetes."

The results also highlight the need for contouring of the pancreas when planning radiation therapy, to achieve as low as possible radiation dose to the organ, they add.

In an accompanying comment, Kevin Oeffinger from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, USA, says further study is needed to clarify the mechanisms underlying diabetes after abdominal radiation.

"Understanding these mechanisms will, hopefully, result in the development of targeted interventions that will lead to a reduction in risk in this population," he remarks.

http://www.news-medical.net/news/201208 ... ivors.aspx


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2012 5:53 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Cancer survivor hiking Himalayas to raise awareness

PROVO-- It has been nearly five years since BYU student Kristin Sumbot was diagnosed with a rare form of leukemia.

At 17, Sumbot found out she had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and underwent more than 800 days of radiation and chemotherapy to get rid of and keep the aggressive cancer from coming back.

Now married and living in Provo, Sumbot is preparing to take the journey of a lifetime. Sumbot and her mother, Leslie Katich, are leaving Sept. 22 to take a two-week trip to the Himalayas, where they will visit Tibet, Nepal, Kathmandu and hike around the sacred Mount Kailash.

The trip is put on by Above and Beyond Cancer, a nonprofit organization with the goal of reducing the burden of cancer by bringing cancer survivors and caregivers together and promoting policies and programs that will help prevent cancer and improve the outcomes of those diagnosed with cancer.

"The whole point of the trip is to show there is life after cancer, you can still live after you have been so close to death," Sumbot said. "It is so cool to be going across the world and to be around other people that have gone through what you have gone through and to just experience these amazing things."

Sumbot chose to take her mom on her trip with her because she said her mom was always by her side during her battle with cancer.

Katich said both of them had to send in applications for the trip, including details about Sumbot's battle with cancer, the treatment she underwent and how both of them are now working to reduce the burden of cancer in their communities.

Sumbot and Katich were chosen as two of 31 people out of nearly 1,500 applicants.

"It is just a once in a lifetime amazing experience that we are looking forward to," Katich said. "I couldn't think of a better person to climb the mountain with than Kristin. She has faced indescribable mountains with her diagnosis and treatment, and to be able to climb that mountain together is just incredible."

For Sumbot the trip is about more than raising awareness about cancer and showing there is life after cancer. She is raising money to bring life-saving radiation treatment to developing countries. Sumbot is being sponsored by Radiating Hope, a Utah-based nonprofit organization that works to bring the technology needed to fight cancer to countries in need.

"To control cancer like we do in America, where there is around a 70 percent cure rate, you need one radiation machine for every 100,000 people, but in places like Ethiopia there is one for 7 million people, so the ability to control cancer is just not there," said Brandon Fisher, Founder of Radiating Hope. "Cancer is the biggest killer in developing countries. It is one of those things that have gone under the radar."

Fisher said he recommended that Sumbot apply for the trip because of how well she is doing despite battling cancer for nearly three years.

"She is going to do really well and live a good, full life and from talking to her she is just really happy," Fisher said.

In addition to making the trip Sumbot and Katich will both be carrying Tibetan prayer flags with them in honor of others who have battled cancer.

"There are these really cool flags in a whole bunch of different colors and I am taking them up in honor of somebody," Sumbot said. "People that might want to honor someone that has been affected by cancer or is in the fight or who has passed away can buy a flag and I will be taking them around the mountain so they can have the experience too."

Katich works with the Northern Nevada Children's Cancer foundation, which gives financial support to families with children who have cancer. She said that by carrying the prayer flags she will be taking a little piece of all the cancer patients she serves daily up the mountain with her.

"I love what I do and it is great that I get to travel halfway around the world and do it over there, especially with Kristin," Katich said.

The pair will be hiking with the rest of the group around the base of Mount Kailash in Nepal. Because of religious beliefs of those in the area hikers aren't allowed to summit the mountain but Sumbot said she is still looking forward to being in such a sacred place.

"The mountain we are hiking around is the center of the universe for the Buddhist and Hindu and Shaman religions, it is one of the most sacred places in the world," Sumbot said. "They say when you hike around it you have been reborn, that you are a completely different person."

Once Sumbot begins her trip people will be able to track their flags around the world via GPS. Fisher said after her trip Sumbot will bring the flags back and other hikers will take those flags to the base camp at Mount Everest where they will stay forever.

"The flags are kind of unique. They are small and built very loosely. The thought is when the high mountain winds hit them a thread will come loose and each thread represents a prayer of hope and well being for the person whose name is on that flag," Fisher said.

http://www.heraldextra.com/news/local/c ... _form=true


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2012 5:23 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Tool reduces radiation exposure in kids

RESEARCHERS say a new tool for measuring radiation dosage in children will help minimise their exposure to potentially harmful radiation.

The Size Specific Dose Estimates (SSDE) tool is billed by researchers as a more accurate measure of radiation dose, by taking into account a child's age and size.

Researchers hope improved measuring will ultimately reduce the amount of radiation needed to produce quality diagnostic images, such as CT scans.

Monash Medical Centre's head of paediatric imaging, Professor Michael Ditchfield, and CT Medical Imaging Technologist Dana Jackson will present their findings at the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists annual conference in Sydney on Sunday.

Prof Ditchfield says the risks of radiation exposure are 10 times greater in young children than adults.

The researchers hope the tool will minimise a child's exposure to potentially cancer-causing radiation by better taking into account the patient's size and adjusting the dosage accordingly.

They say CT scans are an important diagnostic tool, but each scan must be justified to ensure the benefits outweigh the risks.

Prof Ditchfield says medical radiation of the general public has increased dramatically in the past two decades, largely due to increased CT scans.

The profession is utilising measures to limit exposure, including automated exposure control, use of breast and thyroid shields, and using alternative imaging technologies, such as ultrasound and MRI, he says.

http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/breakin ... 6463332745


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2012 5:21 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Mammograms may raise cancer risk for some

Mammograms aimed at finding breast cancer might actually raise the chances of developing it in young women whose genes put them at higher risk for the disease, a study by leading European cancer agencies suggests.

The added radiation from mammograms and other types of tests with chest radiation might be especially harmful to them and an MRI is probably a safer method of screening women under 30 who are at high risk because of gene mutations, the authors conclude.

The study can't prove a link between the radiation and breast cancer, but is one of the biggest ever to look at the issue. The research was published this week in the journal BMJ.

"This will raise questions and caution flags about how we treat women with (gene) mutations," said Dr Len Lichtenfeld, deputy chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society. He and the society had no role in the research.

Mammograms are most often used in women over 40, unless they are at high risk, like carrying a mutation of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. Having such a mutation increases the risk of developing cancer five-fold. About one in 400 women has the gene abnormalities, which are more common in Eastern European Jewish populations. Unlike mammograms, an MRI, or magnetic resonance imaging scan, does not involve radiation.

The breast cancer screening tests have been proven to save lives and are clearly beneficial for women aged 50 and over who have an average risk of breast cancer. Experts are divided about their value in women younger than 50.

Some studies have suggested women with the genetic mutations could be more sensitive to radiation because the genes are involved in fixing DNA problems. If those genes are damaged by radiation, they may not be able to repair DNA properly, raising the cancer risk.

In several European countries including Britain, the Netherlands and Spain, doctors already advise women with BRCA mutations to get MRIs instead of mammograms before age 30. In the US, there is no specific advice from a leading task force of government advisers, but the American Cancer Society recommends yearly mammograms and MRIs from age 30 for women with BRCA gene mutations.

In the BMJ study, European researchers followed nearly 2,000 women over 18 with one of the gene mutations in Britain, France and the Netherlands. Participants reported their previous chest X-rays and mammograms, including the age of their first screening and the number of procedures. About 850 women were later diagnosed with breast cancer. Roughly half of them had X-rays while one third had at least one mammogram, at an average age of 29.

The researchers did not have a breakdown of how many women were exposed to chest radiation before age 30 but estimated that for every 100 women aged 30 with a gene mutation, nine will develop breast cancer by age 40. They projected the number of cases would increase by five if all of them had one mammogram before age 30. But they cautioned their results should be interpreted with caution because most women didn't have a mammogram before 30.

Researchers found women with a history of chest radiation in their 20s had a 43 percent increased relative risk of breast cancer compared to women who had no chest radiation at that age. Any exposure before age 20 seemed to raise the risk by 62 percent. Radiation after age 30 did not seem to affect breast cancer risk.

"We believe countries who use mammograms in women under 30 should reconsider their guidelines," said Anouk Pijpe of the Netherlands Cancer Institute, one of the study authors. "It may be possible to reduce the risk of breast cancer in (high-risk) women by using MRIs, so we believe physicians and patients should consider that."

The study was paid for by European cancer groups.

Lichtenfeld said the study wouldn't immediately change advice from the American Cancer Society but said concerned women should talk to their doctor about their options. "It's not possible today to make a blanket statement about what women (with the gene mutations) should do, but physicians and patients need to weigh the risks and benefits carefully," he said.

He also warned that women who need scans involving radiation shouldn't avoid them because of breast cancer fears.

"No one should think that they should never get an X-ray because they have the BRCA1 or 2 gene mutations," he said. "Just be careful that the X-rays you get are really the ones that you need."

http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/wellb ... k-for-some


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2012 2:55 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Third injection death

A third person has died from a dye injection identical to that which an inquest found had resulted in two similar deaths at separate Sydney X-ray clinics.

New South Wales State Coroner Mary Jerram yesterday handed down her findings into the deaths of Awad Daoud, 63, and Dragan Kitanovski, 72, who died last year after they were injected with an iodine contrast dye for CT scans in private imaging clinics in Bankstown and Hurstville.

Both men died after they suffered allergic reactions to the dye. ''Since the closing of evidence in this inquest, a similar death has occurred in a radiology clinic,'' she said. Ms Jerram recommended radiology clinics should provide multi-lingual information forms.

http://www.theage.com.au/national/third ... z26SpWYw1I


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2012 5:46 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Chest X-Rays On Young Women With Faulty Genes Increase Breast Cancer Risk

Women with faults in BRCA genes are at higher risk for breast cancer if they receive chest X rays before they are 30, according to a study led by the University of Cambridge that was published online in BMJ on 6 September.

Existing figures already indicate that 2% of breast cancers arise because of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, and women with these faulty genes have a 45 to 65% higher risk of developing breast cancer than women who don't have them.

What the new study shows is women with this genetic risk who are exposed to chest X rays before the age of 30, have a 43% higher risk over and above that, compared to equivalent women with the same genetic risk who are not exposed to chest X rays before that age.

BRCA genes are important for repairing damage to DNA, which can lead to cancer. Radiation like X rays damage DNA. Thus women with faulty BRCA are less able to repair the damage caused by radiation, which puts them at greater risk for developing breast cancer.

Study author Douglas Easton, a Cancer Research UK scientist at the University of Cambridge, told the press "it is important that these women and their doctors are aware of this".

The Study Examined Nearly 2,000 Women with Faulty BRCA Genes

For their study, Easton and colleagues examined data on 1,993 women with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes recruited between 2006 and 2009 to take part in studies in the Netherlands (HEBON), France (GENEPSO), and the UK (EMBRACE).

In those studies, the women had answered questions about their exposure to X rays and mammograms at various ages. Mammograms use low energy X rays to examine breast tissue.

The data shows 848 (43%) of the women were diagnosed with breast cancer, 926 (48%) reported ever having an X ray, and 637 (33%) a mammogram. The average age at first mammogram was 29.

Easton and colleagues found that any X ray exposure to the chest area between the age of 20 and 29 raised the risk of breast cancer by 43%. And any exposure before the age of 20, raised it by 62%. But for exposures occurring between 30 and 39, there appeared to be no raised risk of breast cancer.

Looking at the results a different way, current estimates suggest out of 100 women with the BRCA1/2 mutation aged 30, nine will develop breast cancer by the age of 40, but the findings from this study suggest the nine rises to 14 if all 100 have one mammogram before the age of 30.

Results Should Be Interpreted with Caution

However, the researchers say people should be cautious when using this estimate, because of the low numbers: among the participants only a few with breast cancer had had a mammogram before the age of 30.

They also say they were "puzzled" by some of the differences in breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, and call for larger studies to find out if these really exist.

But they do recommend doctors use non-ionizing imaging techniques, such as MRI, with BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers.

Such a policy is already in place in the UK.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/250290.php


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 85 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

All times are UTC + 10 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.119s | 13 Queries | GZIP : Off ]