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PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 8:33 am 
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Brisbane Children’s Hospital far from perfect say patients

It was supposed to be the superstar of Queensland healthcare but patients have reported the new Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital is far from perfect.

Eleven days after opening, families are complaining the $1.5 billion hospital lacks basic food supplies, access to kitchen facilities and patient entertainment.

9NEWS toured the facility today, discovering many issues had been fixed with new appliances installed, fridges stocked with food and washing machines working.

However a cafeteria is weeks from opening and local parent accommodation will take 15 months to finish.

Health Minister Lawrence Springborg has defended the opening date.

“We’re getting a huge volume of overwhelming positive feedback from parents,” he said.

http://www.9news.com.au/national/2014/1 ... om-perfect


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 14, 2014 10:05 am 
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Perth Children’s Hospital executive director Greg Italiano exits amid fears project is delayed

THE man in charge of WA’s new children’s hospital has left the role unexpectedly amid fears the $1.2 billion project is delayed.

The Sunday Times can reveal Perth Children’s Hospital executive director Greg Italiano “ceased involvement” with the project in October and is now on leave from the Public Sector Commission.

Both Health Minister Kim Hames and the PSC have refused to say whether Mr Italiano was asked to leave, or resigned from his position.

But Opposition health spokesman Roger Cook has called for the Government to come clean, saying it’s clear Mr Italiano has been forced out.

A career public servant, Mr Italiano was forced out of his previous role as WA Police executive director in August 2012 after making unsubstantiated corruption allegations against Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan. He was appointed to the PCH project in September last year.

A PSC spokesman said Mr Italiano had been on secondment to the Health Department, but remains “an officer of the senior executive service” of the PSC.

The Sunday Times tried to email Mr Italiano at the PSC yesterday, using the same naming conventions of all other public sector staff, but received a reply saying the email address did not exist.

Mr Italiano is booked to speak at an infrastructure conference in February as head of the hospital project.

The Sunday Times has confirmed that an interim manager was put in charge between Mr Italiano’s departure and the appointment of his replacement, Tina Chinery.

Mr Cook said the Government must “immediately clarify” the situation.

“The departure of Greg Italiano as the executive director of this project is extremely concerning as it would appear that he has been sacked or pushed aside with the hospital project now in trouble,” he said.

“It smacks of the same excuses the Government made at the time the Fiona Stanley Hospital was lurching from crisis to crisis and the sacking of the senior manager of that project (Nicole Feely) in 2013.”

It is understood top managers at PCH were informed this week that the project was delayed until 2016.

But Dr Hames insists that it remains “on track” to open in November next year.

Mr Italiano did not respond to The Sunday Times’ attempts to obtain a comment from him.

http://www.news.com.au/national/western ... 7155245470


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2014 12:42 pm 
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Australian researchers make breakthrough in fight against bowel cancer

Australian researchers have identified some of the earliest causes of bowel cancer, revealing how the disease begins, grows and develops resistance to drug treatments.

The breakthrough could lead to better use of current chemotherapy drugs and to the development of new treatments for the disease - the third-most-common cancer diagnosed in Australia.

Rob Ramsay, lead researcher and head of the cancer cell biology program at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, said the discovery related to 85 per cent of tumours found in people with bowel cancer who did not tend to have a family history of the illness.

His team had identified how a two-part protective "braking system" in the body failed in these cells, causing the onset and acceleration of the disease, Professor Ramsay said.

While the chromosomes inside bowel cancer cells had long been known to show instability, making their behaviour difficult to predict or target, scientists did not know how this instability began, he said.

After taking cells from about 600 patients and comparing them to cells in test tubes and mouse models, the scientists could see the breakdown of the two-step protective braking system unfolding and triggering the chromosomal chaos.

"In only a few days, the transition from healthy to cancerous cells is visibly stark and the dramatic genomic changes cells go through gives the cancer a breadth of opportunities to rapidly evolve and to deceive and outflank the cancer treatments eventually employed to fight it," Professor Ramsay said.

Until now, scientists thought the chromosomal instability built up randomly over time as cancer cells evolved, while a signalling network called the Wnt pathway held cells back from chromosome chaos. This study shows the instability begins immediately with the breakdown of the Wnt pathway, which occurs in two steps, setting off the disease.

The finding, the culmination of five years' work, had already prompted discussion about whether two commonly used chemotherapy drugs could be used differently to improve their efficacy.

"We think some of the drugs that are more useful in this process might be employed earlier," he said.

It also opened new avenues for scientists trying to develop new treatments for bowel cancer, he said.

The research, conducted by Dr Huiling Xu and 13 other scientists from universities, was published in the journal Cell Reports.

In 2012, nearly 16,000 Australians were diagnosed with bowel cancer and almost 4000 died from it.

http://www.smh.com.au/national/health/a ... 27get.html


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2014 8:18 am 
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More with cancer but fewer die

A more than doubling in the number of new cancer cases in Australia since the early 1980s has a silver lining - a marked rise in survival rates over that time.

An Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report shows the magnitude of cancer's toll in recent years, with a steady increase in new cases linked to the ageing population and better diagnostic technology.

Health experts predict almost 124,000 Australians will have been diagnosed with cancer this year, and more than 45,000 will have died from the disease now responsible for three out of every 10 deaths.

The report, Cancer in Australia 2014, shows new cancer cases rose from 47,417 to 123,920 between 1982 and 2014.

There were significant increases in cancers of the prostate, bowel, breast and lungs.

WA had a lower than average rate of cancer in 2005-2009 when adjusted for age and population, and one of the lowest death rates.

AIHW spokesman Justin Harvey said the big rise in cancer cases could be mostly attributed to the rise in the incidence of prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer in women and lung cancer.

The increase could be partly explained by the ageing and increasing size of the population, improved diagnosis through population health screening programs such as Breastscreen, and improvements in technology used to detect cancer.

Death rates from cancer have fallen, with lung cancer still the deadliest even though it is not one of the most common types.

"Survival from cancer has improved significantly, with five-year survival from all cancers combined rising from 46 per cent in 1982-1986 to 67 per cent in 2007-2011," Mr Harvey said.

"Australians diagnosed with cancer generally had better survival prospects compared with people living in other countries and regions.

"However, these improvements haven't been consistent across all cancers."

Cancers with the biggest improvement in survival rates were prostate cancer, kidney cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

An AIHW report this year predicted WA would have more than 13,000 new cancer cases this year and more than 19,100 a year in a decade.

https://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/natio ... fewer-die/


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2014 12:41 pm 
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Terminally ill dad raises nearly $1 million to save his stepdaughter’s life

A TERMINALLY ill dad’s dying wish for his little girl has come true — he’s raised £500,000 (nearly $1 million) to save her life.

Tom Attwater has brain cancer, but despite his deteriorating health has run an online campaign to ensure his stepdaughter Kelli, who also has cancer, is looked after.

The five-year-old was battling a second round of treatment just months before her stepdad was diagnosed.

When doctors said Kelli was likely to relapse again, Mr Attwater began to raise money for any pioneering treatment she would need. He said the generosity of strangers has overwhelmed him.

“I feel elated. When I saw the figures at 100 per cent to target on JustGiving I was in such shock I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry. Now it’s sunk in I feel like the luckiest man alive,” Mr Attwater, 32, told The Mirror.

“Time is running out for me and my health is declining. But I can now spend my time in peace, enjoying my family safe in the knowledge that I have done my best to give Kelli a chance of a long and happy life.”

Mr Attwater married Kelli’s mum, Joely, about eight months ago and are expecting a baby in May.

“Having a baby is high on Tom’s bucket list and we’re both thrilled, but it’s bittersweet as Tom knows he won’t be around to see our little bump grow up. I still feel in denial about that,” Joely told The Mirror.

“But at the very top of Tom’s bucket list is raising the money for Kelli. Tom is the love of my life and my hero.”

To donate, visit justgiving.com/helpkelli.

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/parent ... 7162608498


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 22, 2014 11:25 am 
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Surgery cancelled at Melbourne hospital

Surgeries have been cancelled after a burst pipe flooded three floors of Melbourne's Epworth Freemasons Hospital.

All patients were moved to other hospitals on Sunday night after a pipe burst in the construction zone on the roof of the hospital which is being redeveloped.

Surgery at the Clarendon Street site has been cancelled and day surgery will take place at other Epworth hospitals on Monday.

http://www.skynews.com.au/news/local/me ... pital.html


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2014 8:11 am 
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Senior staff slam Sydney hospital board

Senior medical staff at the Royal North Shore Hospital have expressed no confidence in the hospital's board regarding its handling of the NSW government's plan to divest hospital land.

The motion on the board's failure to acknowledge the concerns and represent the views of senior clinical staff when dealing with the Ministry of Health was passed on Monday evening.

General staff chose to abstain from voting on a wider no-confidence motion.

RNSH Medical Staff Council chair Adam Rehak says the motion was not meant to undermine the board, but to get them to listen to the concerns of the senior medical staff.

Dr Rehak said while it was a shame senior clinical staff felt compelled to pass a no-confidence motion, the upshot was that the board and medical staff were now talking.

A petition with 12,700-plus signatures opposing the sale or long-term lease of hospital land was presented to the NSW parliament in November.

https://au.news.yahoo.com/nsw/a/2584505 ... tal-board/


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 26, 2014 9:08 am 
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Loom bands 'inhalation danger' to young children

Doctors are warning parents of the need to be vigilant after a spate of children with loom bands stuck up their noses.

Although medics can usually get them out, there is a real risk children could choke on them, the Journal of Laryngology and Otology reports.

The tiny colourful rubber bands, which can be woven to make bracelets, are one of this year's most popular toys.

Emergency doctors reported four cases at one hospital in a week.

They said an inhaled loom band or clip could prove fatal.

Noses or ears
Dr Iain Bohler, a surgical registrar and report author, who has since moved to New Zealand, said while it was common for children to turn up at hospital with small objects in their noses or ears, medics had only started to see this with loom bands fairly recently.

"Often foreign bodies are removed with little more than distress to the child, however, in the worst case scenario, they can lead to blocked airways, cardiorespiratory arrest and death."

Dr Bohler said that loom bands could be a lot of fun, unleashing children's creative minds.

"I would however stress with utmost sincerity, the need for parental vigilance in supervising young children playing with loom bands, or any other toy or item with small parts."

Global craze
Rainbow loom, the plastic device for weaving the small bands, was invented in 2011.

The craze for making them into jewellery and even items of clothing has taken off worldwide.

Celebrities including the Duchess of Cambridge and David Beckham have been spotted wearing loom band bracelets.

Two of the children reported by Dr Bohler had inserted one of the s-shaped hooks - used to complete loom band bracelets - into their nose. One child ended up swallowing it after initially choking.

The other two young children had managed to get loom bands stuck in their nasal passages.

Local anaesthetic and crocodile forceps were needed, with the children becoming very distressed at attempts to get the objects out.

Dr Bohler said: "Should any parents be remotely concerned their child has swallowed or inhaled any object, they must contact emergency services immediately."

Dr Donald MacGregor, spokesman for the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, advised parents to be aware that "small objects will always get into places you don't want them to be with young children."

He called for families to ensure they knew what to do in the event of choking.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-30582551


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 28, 2014 7:12 am 
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The Unfortunate Concern That Nearly Half of All Cancer Patients Face

I've said it before and I'll say it again: few, if any, diagnoses are scarier than being told you have cancer.

While this is not something I have myself faced, I was by my mother's side when she received her diagnosis for stage 3b adenocarcinoma of the lung right after New Year's Day in 2010. Acting as her caretaker throughout this process, and never missing an appointment, I can fully understand how taxing cancer can be from a physical, emotional, and spiritual perspective.

Along with all of that, cancer is also a monstrous financial burden.

Cancer patients' unfortunate concern
It's no secret that medical cost inflation has steadily risen for the past five decades, although that increase has arguably slowed over the last couple years. Nonetheless, it would be difficult to persuade a cancer patient that medical cost inflation is under control when his or her medication costs $10,000 per month.

According to an abstract published last year in The Oncologist, the financial burden of paying for cancer treatments can result in poorer quality of life for patients -- even those cured of the disease.

The study was based on 254 cancer patients. Researchers discovered that "financial toxicity," their term to describe the overwhelming cost of paying for cancer treatments, can impact patients from all income and employment statuses.

Nearly half (42%) of all participants cited a "significant or catastrophic subjective financial burden." Sixty-eight percent cut costs by reducing leisure activities, while 46% reduced spending on food and clothing. If that's not already worrisome enough, 20% took less than their prescribed amount of medication, 19% only partially filled prescriptions, and 24% avoided filling their prescriptions altogether. In other words, even being insured is no guarantee that a cancer diagnosis won't become a financial burden on a patient or family.

What's behind monstrous cancer drug costs?
Although cable companies might be Americans' most hated industry, the pharmaceutical sector isn't exactly revered considering the high prices charged for branded drugs that essentially price uninsured and underinsured consumers out of receiving medical care.

What's is behind high cancer drug prescription costs?

In July, I offered 10 reasons why prescription prices in America are so painfully high, and many of those apply to cancer drugs.

For starters, cancer research is extremely costly. Pharmaceutical companies want to develop game-changing cures, but they must cover their expenses first. Considerably more drugs fail in development or testing than get approved, so companies often must charge a high price for drugs to recoup their development costs.

Cancer drugs are also very specialized. For example, recently approved advanced melanoma drug Keytruda, a cancer immunotherapy product developed by Merck (NYSE: MRK ) , costs $12,500 per month. While this drug would not be taken for years on end, as its current indication is as a last line therapy for advanced melanoma patients, this is still a staggering cost. An expense made viable by its specialized status as a uniquely effective last line of defense.

Finally, you have to consider that pharmaceutical companies will use the U.S. as something of a subsidizer for the remainder of the world. Price caps in nations such as India would prevent many cancer drug developers from entering foreign markets. Ultimately, the U.S. market, which is the world leader in pharmaceutical product demand, offsets low drug prices in emerging and underdeveloped markets.

Can costs be lowered?
The real question here is how to lower cancer drug costs and improve cancer patients' quality of life, at least in the point that they aren't constantly worrying about the financial cost of treatment.

The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, could play a role in tempering long-term cancer drug inflation, but I doubt it will be the only contributing factor.

Obamacare's individual mandate and the 28-state Medicaid expansion are designed to get as many people insured as possible. The idea is to reduce insurance premium inflation by spreading the cost of medical care over a greater swath of the American public. Over considerable time, this could equate to more money in consumers' pockets and the ability to purchase higher-quality coverage, such as a gold or platinum plan, that would result in relatively smaller out-of-pocket costs.

A 2012 study published in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings had a different suggestion for lowering long-term cancer drug costs. Authors Mustaqeem Siddiqui and Vincent Rajkumar argued that a value-based reimbursement model is necessary to prevent pharmaceutical companies from setting exorbitant prices. Such a model would have some measurable formula allowing us to gauge how much of an improvement in quality of life a cancer drug brings to patients. The greater the improvement, the higher the price point.

In addition, the authors suggested that this quality of life calculation weigh to some extent in a drug's approval process by the Food and Drug Administration. This data, both during clinical trials and following approval, would allow physicians and cancer patients to make better-informed decisions about which cancer drugs to use and which to avoid.

Finally, Congress could interject with some form of pricing controls such as those seen in India or Switzerland, but I'd deem this pathway highly unlikely as it could be viewed as anti-innovation. Capping drug prices could persuade pharmaceutical companies to look beyond the U.S. to more price-favorable countries.

Will this work?
Truthfully, no one knows with any certainty whether the current rise in prices for cancer drugs is sustainable, or if any of the aforementioned solutions would make things easier for cancer patients. Even if one or more of these cost controls were implemented, it would likely be some time before we saw tangible results trickling down to the patients themselves.

In the meantime, it looks as if pharmaceutical innovation will reign supreme, as will high margins and hefty cancer drug price tags. My hope is that cancer patients will ultimately grow to have improved access to cancer drugs under Obamacare, but it remains to be seen if there's a viable long-term solution to removing this financial burden from their shoulders so they can focus solely on getting better.

http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2 ... ll-ca.aspx


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2014 8:19 am 
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How Ironic: McDonald’s in a Children’s Hospital

When you think of a hospital, especially if it's meant for children, you will probably not imagine a McDonald's food outlet in there.

However, in Australia, it's very real. One hospital in Melbourne, the Royal Children's Hospital, has a McDonald's outlet since it opened a couple of years ago. Now health advocates are concerned that the same thing may happen once the new children's health care facility in Monash will start operating about two years from now.

When asked for confirmation, the spokesperson of Monash mentioned that the hospital hasn't made any firm decision about it, although they did confirm that some portions of the hospital will be up for lease. On the other hand, the McDonald's outlet in Royal Children's Hospital may be staying for a while since they are renting the space for the long term.

Incidentally both of these hospitals are said to be receiving contributions from the charity arm of the fast food chain called the Ronald McDonald House. The money has been incredibly helpful in supporting families and seriously ill children.

Monash Health further said that they are developing a system that aims to help their consumers make healthier choices when it comes to food.

Nevertheless, health experts and advocates believe that the presence of these fast food chains in hospitals, no less, can still be detrimental to health regardless of how they contribute especially financially to these facilities.

One, people may think that by eating there, they are also helping the hospital financially. Second, these fast food restaurants can benefit from the perception of customers about hospitals-that is, their outlets also offer healthy food.

According to its official website, a Big Mac weighs 211 grams and has a total calorie of 530, about 240 of which is from fat. Its cheeseburger is "leaner," with 290 calories. Meanwhile, it opened a healthy café t in Sydney called The Corner. It serves Lebanese lentils and soups with tomato and basil.

http://www.youthhealthmag.com/articles/ ... lories.htm


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 01, 2015 9:02 am 
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Sexual violence soars in UK hospitals

A hidden outbreak of sexual abuse in British hospitals has been disclosed in new figures revealing that more than 1,600 attacks were reported to police in the last three years.

Records obtained by the Guardian under the Freedom of Information Act show a 50% rise in reports of sexual violence in hospitals since 2011. It includes a total of at least 157 rape allegations.

Statistics on sexual abuse reports in hospitals were released by 38 out of 45 UK police forces. They document 1,615 attacks that are known about including cases on NHS wards, private clinics and other health centres. But prosecutors have said that up to 90% of sexual abuse goes unreported, suggesting the true figure could be much higher.

Last year the Metropolitan police received reports of 17 rapes and 124 other sex abuse crimes inside London hospitals.

Most police forces were unable to provide a firm breakdown of the types of hospitals where rapes and sexual abuse had been reported. However, the Met, which accounted for 20% of all reports, said the issue was a particular problem in mental health units, with a significant proportion of alleged victims identified as vulnerable due to mental health problems.

Luciana Berger, the shadow minister for public health, said the figures revealed a serious problem for the NHS and called for an urgent review of hospital security.

Individual cases of abuse in hospitals have been well documented but this is the first time the scale of the problem has been reported. The figures account for all reports of abuse, although a small number are understood to relate to historic attacks that occurred before 2011.

One victim described being groomed by her mental health support officer for five months. When she bumped into him years later it triggered a suicide attempt before she eventually reported him. However, the man resigned before the investigation concluded and authorities were unable to take action against him.

“I was in a vulnerable position at the time; certainly not in a position to consent to what he was doing,” she told the Guardian. “What have I gained by coming forward? Nothing. I’m just a person who has made allegations that haven’t been proven.”

In another case, a mental health patient described psychiatric hospitals as a “playground for predators”, after she was raped up to 60 times by a member of staff. The woman had been taken to Little Brook hospital in Kent after a breakdown and was warned she would be sectioned if she tried to leave. She described her ordeal to the BBC earlier this year. “At times I was on a very heavy amount of Valium, not to where I was unconscious, but the sedative combined with my already defeated self, I was like putty. He would pull the covers back, do what he had to do and leave, all very quickly. I didn’t move.”

When asked whether anyone else at the hospital knew about her abuse, the woman said: “I strongly suspect it can’t have been completely missed. I can’t believe how it could have been so frequent and not picked up on.”

She was eventually paid £100,000 compensation, but her attacker avoided jail after receiving a suspended sentence.

A third case saw the care assistant Naraindrakoomar Sahodree jailed in 2010 for repeatedly raping a multiple sclerosis sufferer in her bed at a central London hospital. He had managed to get the job despite already being struck off the nurses’ register. In court, his victim said that Sahodree made sure she could not call for help by removing her warning buzzer.

Berger said: “A zero-tolerance approach to sexual abuse must be pursued in the NHS. All victims should feel safe to come forward and every incident properly dealt with by the police, courts and health service, to ensure every perpetrator is brought to justice.”

Berger said it was particularly worrying that people in mental health units appeared to be at high risk. “These are often some of the most vulnerable patients and their safety must be guaranteed,” she said. “Ministers must order an immediate review of security, with a focus on mental health units.”

Nat Miles, senior policy and campaigns officer at Mind, said: “It’s completely unacceptable that sexual abuse is so prevalent within mental health units. Many people told us they are often seen as vulnerable and therefore an easy target by perpetrators, and are more easily discredited and less likely to be taken seriously if they report a crime.” She added: “Too often, crimes on wards are dealt with internally and not reported to police. It’s vital that frontline staff are adequately trained, so crimes are taken seriously, and dealt with quickly and appropriately.”

An NHS England spokesperson said: “It is of course essential that both NHS and independent hospitals do everything to ensure that patients are safe and feel safe in their premises, and where concerns arise the police must be able to bring to bear the full force of the law.”

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014 ... -hospitals


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 03, 2015 8:28 am 
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Kentucky Boy Dies Of The Flu In His Father’s Arms As He Begs Hospital Staff For Help

A Kentucky boy died of the flu in his father’s arms as he allegedly begged the hospital staff for help. Mikey Guallpa, 6, was taken to the St. Elizabeth hospital in Florence on December 20. He passed out in the waiting room and was pronounced dead moments later. Jose Guallpa, the sick boy’s father, claims he was told repeatedly to “wait their turn.”

Mikey Guallpa was rushed to St. Elizabeth hospital in Florence, Kentucky, after being seen earlier the same day by the family doctor. The 6-year-old boy was shaking and vomiting. Zara Jimbo, the boy’s mother, told the media that her husband begged the hospital staff for help, but they were instructed to sit in the waiting room and wait.

Approximately 20 minutes after Mikey Guallpa and his parents arrived at St. Elizabeth hospital, he vomited one final time, passed out, and died.

“They should have got to him earlier when we were asking for help, when we were begging to, you know, he needs help,” Zara Jimbo told local Lex 18 News. “He’s not okay, but they were looking at us like we were crazy. This is not a hardware store or a grocery store. This is a hospital about health. It’s like health, helping people, saving lives.”

Jose Guallpa is still struggling to understand what happened at the St. Elizabeth hospital emergency room, and to accept the death of his young son.

“It’s not right, just please look at him,” the elder Guallpa said he begged Florence, Kentucky, hospital staff. “Lady all what she got to say was just wait for your turn. What? Wait for my turn to see my son die?”

The hospital is not commenting about the flu death of Mikey Guallpa, but the Florence health care center did issue a public release.

“We are unable to comment or release any specific information. As an organization, St. Elizabeth takes protecting the privacy of our patients’ protected information very seriously.”

The Northern Kentucky Health Department said that Mikey Guallpa had a “chronic health problem” which may have made him more susceptible to the flu. As previously reported by the Inquisitr, the CDC has declared a flu epidemic. The H3N2 flu strain has now reached at least 22 states and been blamed for at least 16 child deaths.

http://www.inquisitr.com/1722647/kentuc ... -for-help/


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2015 12:42 pm 
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ESPN's Stuart Scott inspired those battling cancer

(CNN)If you don't know who Stuart Scott was, those who do will likely point you to one particular speech to share why his death reverberates so strongly across the country.

Scott, a veteran anchor on ESPN, died Sunday after a seven-year battle with cancer. He was 49.

He built a career as a sports anchor, but his eloquent observations on his battle with cancer, and the encouragement and motivation to others fighting the disease, made him a role model.

"When you die, that does not mean you lose to cancer," Scott said in the July speech at the ESPY Awards. "You beat cancer by how you live, why you live and the manner in which you live."

It is a line that anyone who has lost a loved one to cancer can take comfort in, and one being repeated much on Sunday, following Scott's death.

Scott was accepting the Jimmy V Perseverance Award at the ESPYs, and honored the award's namesake -- college basketball coach and broadcaster Jim Valvano -- by reflecting on Valvano's own speech in 1993.

"I listened to what Jim Valvano said 21 years ago, the most poignant seven words ever uttered in any speech anywhere: 'Don't give up. Never give up,'" Scott said. "I'm not special; I just listen to what the man said. I listen to all that he said, everything that he asked of us."

Scott worked for ESPN for 21 years, and is credited with coining catchphrases like "Boo-yah" and "as cool as the other side of the pillow."

He was born in Chicago and grew up in North Carolina. His early career took him from Florence, South Carolina, to Raleigh, North Carolina, and later to Orlando.

Scott was diagnosed with stomach cancer in 2007.

During that speech, Scott spoke of counting on others for help, and the comfort of family members, even if only to cry with them on the phone.

His message was this: "So live, live. Fight like hell."

In that same speech, Scott made it clear what his priorities were.

"I have one more necessity -- it's really two," he said, referring to his daughters. "The best thing I have ever done, the best thing I will ever do, is be a dad to Taelor and Sydni. It's true."

Rich Eisen, a sportscaster for NFL Network who was previously Scott's SportsCenter partner at ESPN, asked for prayers for Scott's family during an emotional segment Sunday.

"He battled cancer as bravely as anybody else, and I know there many people out there who are battling cancer right now," Eisen said. "Stuart would want you to know to keep fighting."

His ESPN colleagues likewise honored him on air.

"Our colleague, our friend, and our inspiration Stuart Scott passed away earlier today," ESPN's Hannah Storm said.

President Barack Obama said that although his travels often kept him away from his family, Scott and the "SportsCenter" crew kept him company on his trips.

"Over the years, he entertained us, and in the end, he inspired us -- with courage and love," Obama said in a statement.

http://edition.cnn.com/2015/01/04/us/st ... emembered/


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 07, 2015 6:53 am 
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New Year's 'detoxes' are a waste of time and money

From a scientific standpoint, there's no good reason to do a "detox" unless you're in rehab. No amount of juicing will atone for the health sins of 2014, and you might be doing yourself more harm than good.

It would be great if the right combination of freshly squeezed juices could make us all healthier and happier, but that just isn't the case. This isn't news: As quickly as juice cleanses have emerged as a popular diet option in recent years, scientists have emerged to debunk their usefulness.

For starters, the idea of a need for a detox -- that your body is full of things that shouldn't be there, and can be flushed out by more "natural" food and drink -- is a tad misguided. From The Telegraph:

One misconception confronted in the report is the notion that "you can lead a chemical-free life." This is clearly wrong because everything is made of chemicals, and so claims that products are "chemical-free" are not true.

A report on the Greenpeace International website states: "If someone came into your house, mixed you a cocktail of chemicals and offered it you, would you take them? Of course not.

"You wouldn't want untested chemicals in your home, your drink or your body. You don't want them but, shockingly, they're already there."

Derek Lohman, an inorganic and radio chemist, said: "If someone came into your house and offered you a cocktail of butanol, iso amyl alcohol, hexanol, phenyl ethanol, tannin, benzyl alcohol, caffeine, epigallocatchin and inorganic salts, would you take it?

"It sounds pretty ghastly. But tea is a complex mixture containing the above chemicals in concentrations that vary depending on where it is grown."

"Let's be clear," Edzard Ernst, emeritus professor of complementary medicine at Exeter University, told The Guardian, "there are two types of detox: one is respectable and the other isn't. . . . The [use outside of drug rehabilitation] is the word being hijacked by entrepreneurs, quacks and charlatans to sell a bogus treatment that allegedly detoxifies your body of toxins you're supposed to have accumulated."

Here's the thing: Your body is designed specifically to detoxify itself 24/7. If bad things could just build up infinitely in an otherwise healthy individual, we'd all be done for. And there's no evidence that drinking extra water or consuming certain foods speeds up this process in the least. If you've got the feeling that your kidneys aren't pulling their weight, you don't need a week of juicing – you need to see a doctor.

But for most people, doing a detox regimen – especially during peak New Year's Resolution season – is about getting healthier (and usually thinner) in general, not just cutting down on dangerous "chemicals." So is there any reason to chug kale juice exclusively for a few days?

Fasting (which is what you're doing if you're living on juice, come on) can actually make it harder for your body to go about its natural "detoxing" processes. If you're eating less food, you're having fewer bowel movements and that's where most of the unfriendly stuff is supposed to end up. Fasting can also slow down your metabolism, so it's not a good choice for weight loss either. And doctors warn that those in poor health shouldn't fast, so it's not a great thing to jump into after a month-long holiday binge.

There's nothing wrong with wanting to start 2015 off nice and healthy, but don't let the thrill of self-deprivation – or misplaced trust in a high price tag – fool you into taking the detox route. Enjoy a kale-filled smoothie for breakfast if you so desire (full disclosure: I certainly do), but remember that the best way to live a non-toxic life is to work out and eat a wide variety of foods – not spend a week slurping down beet juice.

http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/diet-an ... 2ietq.html


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 9:17 am 
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Cancer Research Institute Suggests Cancer Cure Could Come

Jill O’Donnell-Tormey is the CEO and director of scientific affairs for the Cancer Research Institute, which focuses its research budget on promising cancer immunotherapy research.

In recent years, new drugs like Yervoy, Opdivo and Keytruda have some people talking about “curing” cancer–and it isn’t just the patients.

“As a scientist, I have been reluctant in the past to use the word “cure” when it comes to cancer, but the durable remissions we are now seeing in some previously untreatable patients gives me and many others great hope that we will, in fact, one day eliminate cancer deaths and effectively cure this disease,” O’Donnell-Tormey says.

“The immune system plays an important role in cancer development and control, and we’re learning through scientific research how the two are related, with the end result being new ways to treat and in some cases prevent cancer with drugs that augment and direct the body’s inherent defenses,” she concludes.

On Friday, January 9, 2015 at 4:00 Eastern, O’Donnell-Tormey will join me for a live discussion about this promising field of research that could lead to a cancer cure. Tune in here then to watch the interview live.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/devinthorpe ... ould-come/


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