Brain Tumour Survivor

A site dedicated to leading edge treatment for brain tumours
It is currently Fri Nov 24, 2017 7:11 pm

All times are UTC + 10 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 1000 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 63, 64, 65, 66, 67  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat Dec 27, 2014 9:51 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Festive cheer without the hangover

Christmas has become synonymous with alcohol, but that doesn’t have to be the case and we must allow people to abstain, says Evelyn Gillan

FOR the past couple of months we’ve been bombarded with adverts reminding us, as if we could possibly escape it, that it’s the season of excess. Over-indulgence in food, drink and presents is the only way to have the “perfect” festive season apparently.

Most people drink more than usual, what with office parties, catching up with friends and family, and bringing in the New Year. The licensed trade enjoys its busiest time and supermarkets use every opportunity to increase footfall with special offers on beers, wines and spirits. It seems Christmas just wouldn’t be Christmas without the shops competing to offer the cheapest alcohol deals.

Spare a thought for people who have alcohol problems or who have been through treatment and are trying to stay sober. This can be an especially tough time of year for them and their families. The pressure to drink is everywhere and people can give in to temptation and experience a relapse. It is difficult to always make the healthy choice when surrounded by cheap alcohol, which is easily available and aggressively marketed. The alcohol industry relies on customers who drink too much to boost their gains – if everyone drank in moderation, their profits would plummet.

There is also the endless encouragement to drink from well-meaning friends, family and colleagues. Never pressure someone into having a drink. There are a whole host of reasons why someone doesn’t want to drink alcohol. They could be driving, or pregnant, or on medication, recovering from alcohol problems – or maybe they just don’t drink. No-one should need an excuse to refuse a drink but we’ve all been in the situation where we’ve been made to feel uncomfortable for saying “no thanks”. You wouldn’t force any other toxic substance on someone, so why alcohol?

The perfectly produced, twinkly television adverts full of smiling families celebrating with glasses of Champagne are a far cry from the booze-fuelled mayhem that the emergency services have to deal with as nights out (and in) end in hospitals and police cells. It isn’t just teenagers and twentysomethings who get into vulnerable situations when drunk. Illness and injury, risky behaviour, regrets and falling out with friends, family and colleagues are the chance anyone who drinks too much takes.

Try celebrating with less alcohol this year – pace yourself, have plenty of water or soft drinks in between alcoholic drinks and eat something before you go out. Staying safe means staying in control and planning ahead how you will get home. The new lower drink drive limit means you shouldn’t drink anything if you plan to get behind the wheel, and think twice about driving the next morning too if you have had a lot to drink the night before. If in any doubt, use public transport.

A Christmas party binge might be a one-off, but it’s easy to go from drinking in moderation to regularly drinking to excess, and before you know it your alcohol consumption is at the level which is damaging your health, relationships or work. Drinking isn’t a cure for the winter blues; rather than being a stress reliever, alcohol can make feelings of anxiety and depression worse. There are better, healthier ways to cope with stress than using alcohol. If you are having problems controlling your drinking, or are worried about a loved one, you should talk to your GP.

Once the festive season is over, thoughts turn to New Year’s resolutions and forming healthier habits. Taking a breather from alcohol lets your body recover and you will quickly feel the benefits of cutting down or not drinking at all.

In the short term, you may notice you sleep better, have improved concentration, lose weight and save cash, and you certainly won’t miss the fuzzy head and nausea of a hangover. In the longer term, you will be doing your health a big favour by reducing your risk of high blood pressure, stroke, cancer and liver damage. Taking part in a campaign like Dry January gives people the perfect opportunity to have a break from alcohol so they can reassess how much they’re drinking. Research has shown that a month off can lower liver fat, blood glucose and blood cholesterol.

This year, enjoy the benefits of drinking less, not just for the month of January, but all year round.

http://www.scotsman.com/news/festive-ch ... -1-3643986


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2014 8:13 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Vic to introduce tough raw milk laws

VICTORIAN dairy farmers and manufacturers will have to treat raw milk or add a bitter taste to it under new laws aimed at preventing human consumption.

IT comes after the death of a Victorian three-year-old who reportedly consumed unpasteurised milk linked to a company that produces organic bath milk.

The Victorian health department has also warned people against drinking raw milk after four children under five fell seriously ill.

Unpasteurised or raw milk is not allowed to be sold in Victoria for human consumption but it is presently sold as bath milk or cosmetic milk.

Under regulations to come into effect from January 1, producers must treat raw milk to reduce harmful bacteria or make it unpalatable by adding a bitter taste.

Dairy producers who breach the new licence conditions face a fine of 120 penalty units, or $17,700, and could have their licence to produce dairy products cancelled.

Consumer Affairs Minister Jane Garrett announced the changes on Sunday and repeated that raw milk was not safe to drink and the new laws would better regulate the industry to protect consumers.

"We believe these tough new conditions at the farm gate will protect Victorian consumers, both those who accidentally consume raw milk and those who intend to do so deliberately," she told reporters.

The government was working with other states in a national approach led by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, she said.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/la ... 22b13dae3a


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 31, 2014 12:30 pm 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Why eating red meat raises cancer risk

Red meat elevates the risk of cancer because it contains a chemical that’s unnatural to human biology, according to a new study by UC San Diego scientists.

The report, published Monday, diverges from a popular hypothesis that the higher risk comes from carcinogenic chemicals produced by grilling.

It instead concludes that when people consume beef, pork, lamb and bison, a sugar molecule called Neu5Gc from those meats gets fully incorporated into human tissue. The immune system then attacks that substance, leading to tissue inflammation and a higher lifetime risk of cancer.

The same process also could happen when people consume whole milk, certain cheeses and caviar, which consists of fish eggs. (Fish can produce Neu5Gc, but they store it in their eggs and not their fleshy muscles.)

EATING RED MEAT RAISES CANCER RISK

Dr. Ajit Varki, who led the latest study, said the Neu5Gc phenomenon is unprecedented.

“In this case, the foreign sugar is like a Trojan Horse. It becomes part of your own cells,” he said. “When you react to a peanut or other allergy-causing substance, you’re reacting to something foreign. This is the first example we know of something that’s foreign, gets totally incorporated into you despite the fact that your immune system recognizes it.”

Dr. Ajit Varki, shown, and his team of researchers at UCSD think they have identified why red meat (beef, pork, lamb) causes the formation of tumors -- and thus cancer. It involves a sugar molecule called Neu5Gc.

Earlier studies have linked red-meat consumption to a number of cancers, especially colorectal, breast, prostate, ovarian and lung cancers. Varki said Neu5Gc plays the role of “gasoline on the fire” — it boosts the cancer risk, but doesn’t seem to be the ultimate cause of the disease.

While Varki doesn’t eat red meat, he refrains from recommending that other people do the same.

In fact, his team’s analysis may eventually forge a middle ground between those who love their red meat and those who contend that it has no place in the human diet. Selective breeding may allow ranchers to reduce the amount of Neu5Gc, said one expert who reviewed the new paper. It also may be possible to develop an antidote of sorts to counteract the cancer risk, Varki said.

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2014/dec ... Gc-sialic/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 9:26 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Post-festive period is unrecognised mental health dark spot

I write this shortly after completing the documentation for a patient who attempted suicide. This is not an unusual event for a psychiatrist; what is significant is that the attempt occurred after the patient returned home from Christmas dinner with their children. Fortunately having survived and currently receiving treatment, I feel a full recovery is likely.

Many would hear the story as yet another example of the tyranny of "holiday blues" - the terrible imposition on all of us to be merry and enjoy forced festivities, with family feuds and workplace rivalries peppering the frivolousness. It's intuitive that the holidays must be stressful for many. Not just for lay people; a recent informal survey by the American Psychiatric Association found as many as 60 per cent of psychiatrists believed that the Christmas period was associated with an increase in depression and suicides. Multiple mental health authorities have published how-to guides about depression management in the holiday season.

However, this is simply not true. There is no evidence that the Christmas and New Year's period is associated with depression or suicide. Sansone reviewed this in 2011, noting multiple studies finding a reduction in self-harm behaviour over several studies - such as Karoly's 2005 study of 140,000 suicides, which showed fewer male suicides occurred during the Christmas holidays. The overall presentation to mental health services was also shown to drop at this time. One study reviewed found a reduced number of presentations to a psychiatric emergency department for any reason - a pattern maintained over seven consecutive years.

This is, unfortunately, not all good news. Sansone also found that there was a worrying rebound in mental health presentations immediately after the Christmas period, in the new year. This increase appeared to match the decrease that was seen during Christmas. This phenomenon has also been noted independently in several different studies. A 1999 Danish study found suicide attempts rise by 40 per cent in the first two weeks after the new year.

What is often underplayed is the effect of Christmas - regardless of anyone's opinion of the holiday - in increasing connectiveness and brings family and friends together. This social aspect may explain the drop in suicides. Similarly, when this effect ends at the termination of the holiday season, this reduction in socialisation may also explain the increase - as with my patient.

I invite you, therefore, as you enter the New Year, to spare a thought about the loved one or colleague who was surprisingly quiet at the last get-together. Has there been a change in their functioning? Are they their usual selves? If not, seek them out a second time, to see whether they may need a mental health review. At worst, it could simply be a waste of your time. At best, it could help us all to have a happy New Year.

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/comment ... 2gga3.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2015 8:42 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Dairy industry wants to slap sports-related health claims on milk

Chocolate milk, not brightly hued sports drinks, can be a better way to enhance exercise and speed up recovery, research has found.

And the milk industry wants everyone to know it.

Dairy Australia has urged Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ), which has proposed to ease health-claim labelling rules for electrolyte sports drinks, to consider milk and milk-based beverages as well.

"There's lots of evidence that shows milk can replenish fuel stores after a workout, rehydrate, repair muscles, and support exercise performance," said Helen Mair, policy adviser at the industry services body. "We want to communicate these [on milk packaging]."

New research, funded by Griffith University, found Pauls full cream milk, So Good soy milk and Sustagen Sport liquid meal replacement restored lost fluids better than Powerade sports drink.

In the study, published last monthin Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, 15 men rode on stationary bikes wearing heavy clothing to encourage sweat loss.

At the end, they were stripped nude, dried and weighed. The men lost nearly 2 per cent of their starting body weight. They then consumed one of the four drinks in the first hour and were weighed again three hours later.

The researchers, led by Associate Professor Ben Desbrow, found milk was as good, if not better than, sports drinks in replacing lost fluids after intense exercise.

"The results of this investigation demonstrate that consumption of a milk-based liquid meal supplement following exercise results in improved fluid retention when compared with cow's milk, soy milk, and a carbohydrate–electrolyte drink. Additionally, cow's milk and soy milk were similarly effective at enhancing fluid restoration in comparison with the carbohydrate-electrolyte drink," the researchers reported.

Dairy Australia's submission to Food Standards pointed to five academic papers that found chocolate milk restored and supported exercise performance after intense exercise.

Geoff Parker, chief executive of the Australian Beverages Council, said he welcomed the dairy industry's push for increased labelling rights, as long as there was credible and substantiated research to prove milk's effectiveness on athletes.

The organisation's members include Coca-Cola - the maker of Powerade - and producers of flavoured milk.

"Research proving the effectiveness of sports drinks has been around for three decades. So if milk can meet that same evidence base, they should be able to make a sports-related health claim," he said.

Veteran nutritionist Rosemary Stanton said the general population did not need to worry about rapid fluid replacement and other electrolyte benefits if they were not engaged in strenuous, high-endurance sports at elite levels.

She is against FSANZ's proposal to ease restrictions on manufacturers to allow them to add health claims on sports drinks, which can have as much sugar as soft drinks.

"But milk's good for everyone, so I don't have any objections to that," she said. "The next stage is to find out about fortified milk. Some don't have much protein, such as rice milk, and may not be as effective."

Part of FSANZ's proposal could lead to sports drinks being exempted from a regulation that prohibits health claims on products deemed unhealthy overall.

Jane Martin, from the Obesity Policy Coalition, said she did not want to see chocolate milk with high added sugar being promoted as healthy.

"It might be better to drink a milk-based product instead of Coca-Cola because there is some benefit to it, but people are already very confused by what's healthy and what's not," she said.

"Health claims are a very powerful marketing tool and unfortunately I think we're going to see more of these kinds of challenges to the food code."

Dairy Australia also wants lactose, which can account for up to 8 per cent of milk, to be added to the regulator's list of specified sugars required in electrolyte drinks.

http://www.smh.com.au/national/dairy-in ... 2gtaz.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2015 10:12 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
'Fake meal' pill uses phantom calories to fight obesity

An "imaginary meal" pill is the latest weapon developed by scientists to fight obesity.

The pill tricks the body into thinking it has consumed a large amount of calories - as if you have just eaten a substantial meal.

In early tests on mice it effectively halted weight gain, lowered cholesterol, controlled blood sugar, and reduced levels of unhealthy white fat.

US lead scientist Dr Ronald Evans, director of the Salk Institute's Gene Expression Laboratory in La Jolla, California, said: "This pill is like an imaginary meal. It sends out the same signals that normally happen when you eat a lot of food, so the body starts clearing out space to store it. But there are no calories and no change in appetite."

The drug, fexaramine, activates a protein called the farensoid X receptor (FXR) that plays a role in how the body releases bile acids from the liver, digests food and stores fats and sugars.

At the start of a meal, FXR prepares for an influx of food, not only triggering bile acid release but also altering blood sugar levels and instigating the burning of some fats.

Other drugs have been developed that act on FXR pathways, but they affect several organs and have unwanted side effects. An important feature of fexaramine is that it only functions in the gut and does not dissolve into the blood like appetite suppressants or caffeine-based diet drugs.

Since it does not reach the bloodstream, it is likely to be safer than other FXR-targeting drugs, say the researchers who are working to set up clinical trials that will test fexaramine's effectiveness in human patients.

Obese mice given a daily dose of the drug for five weeks stopped gaining weight, lost fat, and had lower blood sugar and cholesterol levels than untreated mice.

They also experienced a rise in body temperature, a sign that their metabolism was ramping up. Some of the deposits of white fat in their bodies were converted into the healthier form of calorie-burning "brown" fat.

The drug even affected bacteria in the guts of the mice, although what these changes mean is not yet clear.

Dr Evans compared fexaramine's effect in the intestine to the start of a relay race.

"The body's response to a meal is like a relay race, and if you tell all the runners to go at the same time, you'll never pass the baton," he said. "We've learned how to trigger the first runner so that the rest of the events happen in a natural order."

Ideally the drug, would work in conjunction with diet and lifestyle changes to combat obesity, said the scientists, whose research is reported in the journal Nature Medicine.

http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/diet-an ... 2ifjq.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2015 12:45 pm 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Food poisoning at Qld restaurant hits 80

A Chinese restaurant in southeast Queensland has been shut down after a mass bout of food poisoning.

About 80 people are understood to be affected by the suspected salmonella outbreak that has seen the Logan City Council temporarily close the restaurant at Springwood, just south of Brisbane.

The council is working with Queensland Health to investigate after patrons, some of whom remain in hospital, fell ill on the weekend.

Tests have been carried out, but a Metro South Health spokesman said it was too early to confirm what caused the outbreak.

"As of Wednesday afternoon, we'd received nine formal complaints, but they relate to multiple people," the spokesman said.

"Metro South Public Health is investigating, with samples and statements taken from a number of people."

A Logan council spokeswoman said a temporary closure was placed on the restaurant to ensure no further risk while the investigation is being completed.

"We also encourage people who would like to report any other alleged cases of illness to contact Queensland Health," she said.

Early suspicions for the food poisoning have been aimed at deep fried ice cream and prawns.

The council and Metro South Health say the closure order doesn't mean the restaurant is to blame for the outbreak as it may have been supplied with contaminated food.

http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2015 ... nt-hits-80


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2015 9:26 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Chancing your arm

WHAT could be more welcome in a season that demands fresh starts, abstinence and “detoxing” than to discover that you do not have to lift a finger to avoid cancer? A paper published last week in Science seemed to offer seasonal bingers every reason for ripping up their New Year’s resolutions. According to many reports of the research, it suggested two-thirds of human cancers are caused by nothing more than bad luck.

Clean-living folk will be pleased to hear that the scientists concerned are saying nothing of the sort. One of the paper’s authors, Cristian Tomasetti of Johns Hopkins University, was happy to clarify: “We have not showed that two-thirds of cancer cases are about bad luck. Cancer is in general a combination of bad luck, bad environment and bad inherited genes.”

Dr Tomasetti and his colleague Bert Vogelstein were looking at why cancers are more frequent in some parts of the body than in others. They wanted to know if the rate was related to the frequency with which cells in these tissues divide. Every time a cell replicates there is a chance of a mutation. More divisions means more mutations and perhaps more cancers.

Organs renew themselves from special cells called stem cells that, when they divide, produce one daughter cell which is another stem cell, and a second which goes on to generate descendants that are cells needed by the tissue in question. Dr Tomasetti and Dr Vogelstein plotted the average number of times a stem cell divides during the course of a lifetime in 31 types of tissue against the lifetime risks of cancer developing in those tissues. They found a strong correlation.

The results indicate that two-thirds of the variation in cancer risk between different tissues is caused by chance mutations associated with cell division. This is not the same as saying that two-thirds of cancer cases are caused by chance, because the results do not offer any information about the relative rates of occurrence of the cancers in question. Moreover, Dr Tomasetti and Dr Vogelstein were unable to include two of the most common cancers (breast and prostate) in their analysis, because the relevant stem-cell data are not available for these. What their study does explain is the long-known but curious phenomenon that apparently similar parts of the body suffer different rates of cancer. Stem-cell turnover means, for example, that tumours of the large intestine are commoner than those of the small one, while basal-cell carcinomas in the skin are commoner than melanomas.

None of this, though, is reason for fatalism. Copying errors during cell division are by no means the only source of cancer-causing mutations. Chemicals that damage DNA, ultraviolet light, ionising radiation and viral infections are all culprits too—and culprits that can often be avoided by thoughtful behaviour.

Overall, according to research done in Britain by Cancer Research UK, a charity, 42% of cancer cases are tied to factors within an individual’s control. These include smoking (which, through the carcinogenic chemicals it creates, causes 86% of lung cancer, 65% of oesophageal cancer, 37% of bladder cancer and 29% of pancreatic cancer), poor diet (51% of stomach cancer and 56% of head and neck cancer), overexposure to sunlight (86% of malignant melanomas) and infection with papilloma virus (almost 100% of cervical cancer). Obesity, alcohol and lack of exercise are also in the frame. The best advice, then, remains: keep slathering on the sun cream, avoid tobacco smoke, eat and drink well, exercise regularly and, if you are a young woman, have an anti-papilloma vaccination.

http://www.economist.com/news/science-a ... re-due-bad


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 1:09 pm 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Drug shown to prevent and treat diabetes in mice

Research carried out at the University of California (UC), Davis and the University of Barcelona has uncovered an enzyme inhibitor found to prevent and reverse the effects of diabetes in obese mice. In addition to discovering a potential form of treatment for the disease, scientists say the study has shone new light on healthy properties of fatty acids.

The researchers have shown the enzyme called soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to be capable of reducing the symptoms of diabetes in mice by stabilizing metabolites in an omega-3 acid called DHA. Previously observed in the lab at UC Davis, the researchers say that the drug they are working on has either reduced or reversed diabetes-related ailments such as renal failure, hypertension, diabetic pain, hardening of the arteries and heart failure.

Now research conducted by Joan Clària, an associate professor at the Barcelona School of Medicine, takes things a little further. She reported the discovery that for mice that happen to have higher levels of certain fatty acids, the drug actually provided a cure for the disease.

"Our previous studies show the drug we are working on will reduce the symptoms of diabetes in mice by itself,” says Dr. Bruce Hammock, who runs the Hammock Laboratory of Pesticide Biotechnology at UC Davis. "But the excitement about Joan Clària’s work is that if the mice have a genetically increased level of omega-3 fatty acids, the drug offers prevention or cure in mice.”

Another UC Davis researcher, who is not involved in this study, says that the apparent link between stabilizing the metabolites in DHA and curing the symptoms of diabetes increases understanding of the impacts of omega-3 fatty acids on wellbeing.

“This exciting research brings mechanistic detail to understanding how omega-3 fatty acids in the diet exert important health effects,” said J. Bruce German, director of the UC Davis Foods for Health Institute, Department of Food Science and Technology.

http://www.gizmag.com/uc-medication-dia ... ice/35556/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2015 2:21 pm 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Home birth funding considered by ACT Health to ease pressure on Canberra's Centenary Hospital

The ACT Government has revealed it is considering publicly funding home births for pregnant mothers to ease the demand on the maternity hospital.

The Centenary Hospital for Women and Children at Woden in Canberra's south has been operating at close to capacity since it opened in 2012.

Earlier this week it was revealed ACT Health was considering a plan to refer expectant mothers to a hospital linked to their postcode.

The Centenary Hospital has been popular with pregnant women from across the city, including those who living closer to the Calvary Hospital at Belconnen in Canberra's north.

If the changes were to go ahead, pregnant women would be unable to choose their preferred hospital to give birth.

ACT Health director-general Dr Peggy Brown has revealed options other than the zoning plan were being considered to ease the demand at the site.

"Publicly funded home births are also being looked at," she told 666 ABC Canberra.

"So that's another option that some women may wish to pursue."

Midwifery Assistant Professor Sally Ferguson from the University of Canberra has welcomed the possibility of publicly funded home births.

"If women were to know how birth at home increases their option, or their ability, to have a straightforward birthing experience, then women would demand it," she told 666 ABC Canberra.

"When it becomes a choice, hopefully in the middle of this year, women will take it up."

Last year the Publicly Funded Birth At Home ACT group also called for women to be given the option of staying at home.

Dr Brown said a decision on the postcode system for hospital births was not likely to be made before the end of March.

https://au.news.yahoo.com/a/26003420/ho ... -hospital/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jan 17, 2015 2:16 pm 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
The secret to shedding fat all in our minds?

MONASH University researchers have been pondering whether our brains could instruct our bodies to burn more fat.

Lead researcher Professor Tony Tiganis, from the university's department of biochemistry and molecular biology, said two hormones could assist in the shedding of excess fat.

The hormones are leptin, an appetite suppressant generated in fat cells and insulin, produced in the pancreas in response to rising levels of glucose in the blood.

The researchers found the hormones act on a group of neurons in the brain, causing them to send signals through the nervous system promoting the conversion of white fat into brown fat and leading to excess fat being burnt off.

They discovered through laboratory work that the process could be sped up when certain enzymes were reduced.

Professor Tiganis said this process normally serves to maintain body weight, but in diet-induced obesity this mechanism went awry.

"Eventually, we think we may be able to help people lose weight by targeting these two enzymes," Professor Tiganis said.

"Turning white fat into brown fat is a very exciting new approach to developing weight loss agents.

"But it is not an easy task, and any potential therapy is a long way off."

Researchers from the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, the Indiana University School of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, the University of Pennsylvania, USA and the University of Toronto, Canada collaborated on the research.

The findings were published on Friday in the journal Cell.

http://www.dailymercury.com.au/news/sec ... s/2512087/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jan 19, 2015 2:43 pm 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Is weighing yourself a good idea?

Is it smart to weigh yourself regularly in the interests of weight management – or is it the sort of behaviour that can help stoke an eating disorder?

There's no straightforward answer to this which could explain why attitudes towards regular weigh-ins have swung backwards and forwards over the years. Rewind to the late 90s and the general advice was to toss the bathroom scales – partly because of concerns that fretting over the numbers on the scales could contribute to eating disorders but also because waist measurement was seen as a better guide to weight lost or gained. After all, if you lose fat but gain muscle as a result of more exercise the scales may register no weight loss and possibly some weight gain – although you will look leaner.

But concerns about growing obesity have given the scales a new respectability with a number of studies now suggesting that regular weighing is useful for promoting weight loss and preventing weight gain.

This doesn't convince Dr Rachel Gold, a psychologist with the Eating Disorders Foundation of Victoria (http://www.eatingdisorders.org.au). She'd prefer an emphasis on changing behaviour rather than changing the numbers on the scales – and that goes for anyone who's trying to reach a healthy weight, regardless of whether they have an eating disorder or not.

"Zeroing in on the numbers takes the focus away from other more important issues like 'Am I moving enough and enjoying it, am I eating for health and for pleasure or how is my mood?' These are all things that can affect a person's overall health," she says.

For people at risk of an eating disorder, or who already have one, weighing oneself too frequently can fall into the category of problematic body checking, according to Gold.

"For some people self-worth is often based on things like how much they weigh and how they look in the mirror. Weighing can reinforce the idea of using these kinds of checks to gauge self worth and can perpetuate the eating disorder," says Gold. "Some people can become very reactive to small changes on the scales and this can trigger eating disorder symptoms."

For anyone with disordered eating, staying away from the scales is good advice, agrees Caitlin Reid, a Sydney-based accredited practising dietitian and accredited exercise physiologist – but for others trying to manage their weight, the scales can help prevent kilo creep, the slow, small gains in weight that, over time, can become a significant problem.

"They can be a good tool to help people understand that they need to be more careful about what they eat and drink at the weekend, for example. People often lose weight during the week but then have big weekends where they eat and drink more and this can turn into a small weight gain of a kilo or two which shows up on Monday morning when they jump on the scales. I find that regular weight checks can help keep them focused on maintaining their weight," says Reid, who writes at Health and the City (healthandthecity.com.au).

"Because we gain weight very gradually people are often unaware that it's happening but using the scales to monitor weight once a week can help prevent incremental weight gain."

Still, scales aren't the only way to keep tabs on your weight – trying on the same pair of jeans once a week to check how they fit is more reliable than using the scales, says Reid.

It's also important to remember that weight can fluctuate for reasons other than losing or gaining fat or muscle, she adds. Fluid losses that occur when you exercise in the heat can show up as less weight on the scales, while premenstrual fluid retention can add an extra kilo or two, especially in women with a high salt intake.

"But if you have any dramatic gain or loss of weight in a short time, then always check with your doctor," she stresses.

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/lifesty ... 2qydl.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 11:54 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Lunchtime - a good time to eat

We often hear that breakfast is the most important meal of the day – that it sets us up for a day of healthy eating; provides essential nutrients including fibre, vitamins and minerals and supports weight control.

As we have this discussion though, let's not forget about how important lunch is when it comes to weight control.

The common scenario which now sees busy workers, mums and students eating their 'lunchtime' meal at 2pm or 3pm; and choosing 'lunch' options such as sushi, wraps, rolls and stir fries which are packed full of carbs not only plays havoc with our hormonal balance and cravings but it also sees us consuming a significant number of calories in the second half of the day, when we are least active.

On any weight loss plan, it is a general perception that the less we eat the better, which can somewhat explain the reason why dieters choose a light breakfast and try and hold off from eating lunch for as long as possible. This is the worst thing you can do if you are trying to lose weight.

The human body is programmed according to a circadian rhythm – this means that the body naturally wants to burn calories during the day when it is most active and then more likely to store at night.

Eating late in the day or many hours after rising fails to tap into the metabolic boost we naturally get during the first half of the day, which is why we feel so hungry mid-morning on days we are consuming breakfast early.

Hunger every three to four hours is a good sign, it is a sign you are burning your food well. For this reason, the earlier you have your lunch, even in place of a late morning snack, the better it will be for your metabolic rate. If you are hungry at 11am or 11.30am, eat your lunch then rather than holding off and then bingeing on sweet foods at 3pm or 4pm because your blood glucose has dropped significantly, which can leave you ravenous and prone to overeating.

Lunch also holds the key to nutritional balance – a lunch too low in carbohydrates, such as a tuna salad, can leave you vulnerable to sugar cravings later in the day, while a lunch such as white rice sushi or a Turkish bread sandwich can overload you on fuel and refined carbs, making it difficult to lose weight.

Achieving the right lunch balance to support weight loss and weight control is relatively easy once you know the mix to aim for.

To get the amount of vegetable bulk we need to keep full for another 3-4 hours we need at least 2-3 cups of salad and/or vegetables at lunch.

Next a decent serve of protein such as canned tuna, lean chicken breast or beef or beans or tofu if you prefer a vegetarian eating plan.

The amount of carbohydrate you will need will depend on your level of activity. If you sit down all day for work, just ½ -¾ cup sweet potato, beans or brown rice or a slice of bread or a few crackers will be adequate; more active workers may require one or two cups.

Finally do not forget the good fat – olive oil dressing, nuts or avocado will help to slow your digestion after lunch and keep you full.

In fact, a recent study published in Nutrition Journal found that individuals who included half an avocado with their lunch felt more satisfied and had lower blood glucose levels than dieters who did not.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/well- ... ime-to-eat


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 23, 2015 9:35 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Time to rethink impossible guidelines regarding children's screen time

The amount of time children spend using screens, such as televisions and computers, on a daily basis exceeds recommended guidelines but those guidelines were drawn up at a time when tablets, cell phones and other mobile devices were not as present in everyday life. Unless you are Amish or a doomsday prepper, it is unlikely that the future will mean current screen time guidelines.

And how valid are they anyway? Yes, prolonged use of screens by children is associated with adverse physical and mental health outcomes, such as increased risk of depression and anxiety in adolescent girls, but that is epidemiological curve fitting based on surveys, not real data.

A longitudinal study could start to provide real data though. In 2001 the American Academy of Pediatrics published recommendations that children under the age of two should have no exposure to screens and those over the age of two should have their exposure limited to less than two hours a day. These guidelines and most follow-up studies have been based on asking children about watching TV and playing computer games and without asking about other types of screen media.

To address this, researchers from the University of Western Australia surveyed 2,620 children aged eight to 16 years from 25 primary and secondary schools in Australia. The schoolchildren were shown different screen types, these included: iPad, iPod Touch, laptop, Portable PlayStation, laptop computer and Xbox, and given examples of the different types of activities that could be done with these screens: watch TV, use instant messenger, play computer games, do school and homework.

They were then asked about how many hours they used these screens, from when they woke up until they went to bed, including before, during and after school. It was found that an average of 63% of respondents exceeded the recommended guidelines of less than 2 hours. The most popular screen use with all participants was TV, with 90% of reporting watching TV in the last week; this was followed by laptop (59%), iPad/tablet (58%) and mobile phone (57%).

There was variation on screen use within individual age groups: 45% of the youngest participants (aged eight years) exceeded the guidelines, and 80% of those aged 14-15 years. There was also a difference in screen use between the sexes as noted by lead researcher Stephen Houghton: "As anticipated boys were more likely than girls to exceed the less than 2 hours recommendation for playing computer games. But it was unexpected that girls were more likely than boys to exceed the less than 2 hours recommendation for social networking, web use, and TV/DVD/movies."

"Of particular interest is the rate at which girls are more likely to exceed the less than two hours recommendation for social networking as they got older. Specifically, by 15 years of age girls were over 15 times more likely to exceed the less than 2 hours recommendation compared to their Grade 3 (8 year old) peers, and almost 7 times more so than boys."

This study was based on self-reported use of using different types of screens but did not investigate how this has a direct effect on the children's health. Future studies should try to address this by having more objective measurements on screen use and what impact it has on health.

Stephen Houghton says: "The introduction of mobile devices suggests the less than two hours per day recommendation may no longer be tenable given the surge in social media engagement and school derived screen use. Guidelines for appropriate screen use, should also take into account the extent to which screen use differs across form, activity, sex, and age."

http://www.sciencecodex.com/experts_cal ... ime-149322


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 25, 2015 9:39 am 
Offline
Registered User
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:03 pm
Posts: 18130
Location: Australia
Experts tackle epilepsy with football-style plan

A GENE which controls a network of hundreds of other genes in people with epilepsy has been discovered by scientists in what is being described as the beginning of a “new scientific approach” to finding a cure for the condition.

The breakthrough by British scientists was described by the team leader as, “a bit like trying to tackle a rival football team”, in the need to gain an overall picture rather than concentrate on one “player” or gene.

The team have identified one gene which acts as a major regulator of a network of genes that are highly active in people who have epileptic seizures.

Researchers said their findings offered hope that new disease-modifying therapies can be developed to treat epilepsy`.

The discovery has been welcomed by epilepsy groups in Scotland.

The experts from Imperial College London behind the latest study found that a single gene co-ordinates the network of around 400 others.

Their study, published in the journal Nature Communications, is the first to apply a new “systems genetics” approach to epilepsy.

Instead of studying individual genes, which has been the usual approach in epilepsy until now, the scientists developed new techniques to systematically analyse the activity of genes.

It is known that epilepsy has a strong genetic component, but the risk is related to several factors spread over hundreds of genes. Identifying how these genes are co-ordinated in the brain is important in the search for new anti-epilepsy ­medication. The researchers studied samples of brain tissue removed from patients during neurosurgery for epilepsy. They identified a gene network that was highly active in the brain of these ­patients.

They then discovered that an unconnected gene, Sestrin 3 (SESN3), acts as a major regulator of this epileptic gene network.

It is the first time SESN3 has been implicated in epilepsy.

Study co-senior author Dr Enrico Petretto, of Imperial College, said: “Systems genetics allows us to understand how multiple genes work together, which is far more effective than looking at the effect of a gene in isolation.

“It’s a bit like trying to tackle a rival football team. If you want to stop the team from playing well, you can’t just target an individual player – you first need to understand how the team plays together and their strategy.”

He added: “After understanding how the team plays together, a possible approach to beating a strong side is then to identify a major control point – say the captain or the coach – who co-ordinates the players. This is like our ‘master regulator gene’, which in this case is SESN3.”

Shirley Maxwell, executive director of Epilepsy Connections, a Glasgow-headquartered charity offering advice and support to sufferers and their families, said: “We’re excited about this breakthrough that may, in the long term, offer hope of a cure for epilepsy, which affects around 54,000 people in Scotland.”

http://www.scotsman.com/news/health/exp ... -1-3670055


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 1000 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 63, 64, 65, 66, 67  Next

All times are UTC + 10 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Majestic-12 [Bot] and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.052s | 16 Queries | GZIP : Off ]