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PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 4:41 pm 
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Grape seed, resveratrol and pomegranate provide potent blood pressure lowering effect

(NaturalNews) Adults aged 55 and older face a risk of developing elevated blood pressure greater than 90%, accounting for more than 40 million doctor visits each year and taxing an already overburdened healthcare system. Uncontrolled blood pressure slowly degrades the vascular system throughout the body and takes a particular toll on the kidneys, eyes and delicate arteries around the heart and in the brain. Small increases in blood pressure place an individual at dramatically increased risk from heart attack, stroke, kidney failure and blindness. Researchers focusing on the antioxidant capacity of grape seed, resveratrol and pomegranate found that regular consumption of these foods can effectively reduce blood pressure without the need for dangerous prescription drugs.

Oxidative stress is a significant factor leading to accelerated damage from hypertension. Excess stress prompts changes to the hormone angiotensin that is known to impact blood pressure through an intricate mechanism of vessel and arterial constriction. Natural agents that can lower dangerous levels of cellular oxidative stress are considered paramount to lowering blood pressure in susceptible individuals.

ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme)-inhibitors are among the most popular prescription medications prescribed to negate the effect of the angiotensin hormone, and they create a life of misery for many due to the myriad of side effects inherent with this class of drug. Recent research shows that artificially lowering blood pressure with drugs has virtually no effect on cardiovascular disease risk, compared to lowering readings with natural fruit polyphenols, diet and physical activity.

Writing in the journal Metabolism, nutritional scientists compared the effect of grape seed extract and resveratrol on subjects with metabolic syndrome. Three groups were divided to receive grape seed extract (GSE) at a dose of 150 mg per day, GSE at 300 mg per day or a placebo. After 4 weeks, both GSE supplemented groups experienced systolic blood pressure drops of 5 to 7 percent. This change was considered significant as no other dietary or lifestyle interventions were followed. Researchers believe that GSE and grape-derived compounds including resveratrol can be used to prevent and treat hypertension based on the potent antioxidant load delivered by the fruit extracts.

Pomegranates effectively lower blood pressure in a manner similar to GSE and resveratrol as the juice and extracts contain powerful polyphenols that counteract oxidative stress. This magical fruit also is found to lower circulating levels of the angiotensin hormone that can help blood vessels to relax. The result of a study published in the journal Atherosclerosis demonstrated that consumption of pomegranate juice (50 ml per day for 2 weeks) lowered ACE activity by 36%, leading to a 5% drop in systolic blood pressure.

It should come as no surprise to those following a natural health lifestyle that the key to controlling blood pressure and reducing the risk factors that promote cardiovascular disease are not found in a prescription bottle. Fruits such as the pomegranate and formulated natural extracts from red grape skins and seeds deliver powerful health benefits without any of the associated side effects of synthesized pharmaceuticals.

http://www.naturalnews.com/032433_resve ... ssure.html


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PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 3:23 pm 
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Winning supplement formula increases MSM absorption

(NaturalNews) MSM stands for Methylsulfonylmethane; it is a type of sulfur which is naturally found within all cells of the human body. Without MSM, the body cannot repair or replace damaged tissue in enough time to prevent the body from producing abnormal cells, which may cause illness. MSM deficiencies cause increased sensitivity to pain, gastrointestinal issues, decreased immune function, arthritis, memory loss, skin problems, and brittle, dry hair and nails. Since MSM disappears during food processing, many people decide to supplement their diets with the capsule, tablet, powder, flake, or lotion forms of this sulfur compound. How does one increase or improve the absorption of this compound within the body?

First of all, MSM is present in nature, through the rain that waters agricultural products. Fresh fruits, grains, vegetables and unpasteurized milk contain some MSM, but not enough to be absorbed and satisfactorily supplement a healthy diet. Sulfur is also found in meat, fish and poultry. A good balance of fruits, vegetables grains, and protein should always be part of a nutritious diet; however, many people decide to take MSM supplements to improve their overall health.

For first-time users, it is advised that they take MSM supplements with a meal, to prevent heartburn, drink plenty of water, and only take the smallest amount of MSM that provides relief from symptoms. Typically, new consumers try 1,000 mg or 1/8th to 1/4th teaspoon of powder or flakes each day for one week. Eventually, consumers may increase their doses to 2,000 to 6,000 mg per day, according to individual intestinal fortitude. To minimize intestinal issues, dosing may be split in half.

Consumers will eventually be able to supplement without the addition of foods; it takes about two weeks before results are apparent. It is interesting to note that MSM distributes itself throughout the body and works where it is needed most. Note of caution: MSM makes a person feel more energetic; doses should be taken in the morning and early afternoon, so as to prevent insomnia.

Some consumers decide to take Vitamin C supplements or say, eat an orange, as part of the meal prior to taking an MSM supplement. This is not necessary for MSM supplements to still work for the individual; however, taking Vitamin C with MSM can and does enhance recovery.

Some MSM supplementers mix their intake with Glucosamine, which works well together. Glucosamine strengthens cartilage, reduces inflammation and causes no adverse side effects. The only issue with Glucosamine is that it is a sugar molecule; diabetics must be careful of their sugar intake.

Others take flaxseed oil with MSM and Glucosamine. Flaxseed contains sulfur and works synergistically with MSM and Glucosamine supplements, offering the most improved health formula. The combination boosts metabolism and the immune system, decreases cholesterol, and prevents cancer cells from growing.

For the best absorption of MSM, the powder or flake forms are highly recommended. Consumers may dissolve two to five teaspoons of the powder in water and drink this over a 12-hour time period for the best results. Capsules or tablets may be taken; however, these are much slower to digest and become absorbed.

MSM also comes in a lotion, cream or gel format. When applied to the skin, MSM works very quickly on that specific area, penetrating quickly to foster arthritic pain relief.

Since MSM can thin the blood, people must consult with a qualified healthcare provider before supplementing their diet, if they use aspirin or blood-thinning medication.

http://www.naturalnews.com/032449_MSM_absorption.html


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PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 7:23 pm 
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Curcumin Compound Improves Effectiveness of Head and Neck Cancer Treatment, Study Finds

ScienceDaily (May 19, 2011) — A primary reason that head and neck cancer treatments fail is the tumor cells become resistant to chemotherapy drugs. Now, researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have found that a compound derived from the Indian spice curcumin can help cells overcome that resistance.

When researchers added a curcumin-based compound, called FLLL32, to head and neck cancer cell lines, they were able to cut the dose of the chemotherapy drug cisplatin by four while still killing tumor cells equally as well as the higher dose of cisplatin without FLLL32.

The study appears this week in the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery.

"This work opens the possibility of using lower, less toxic doses of cisplatin to achieve an equivalent or enhanced tumor kill. Typically, when cells become resistant to cisplatin, we have to give increasingly higher doses. But this drug is so toxic that patients who survive treatment often experience long-term side effects from the treatment," says senior study author Thomas Carey, Ph.D., professor of otolaryngology and pharmacology at the U-M Medical School and co-director of the Head and Neck Oncology Program at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center.

That tumors become resistant to cisplatin is a major reason why head and neck cancer patients frequently see their cancer return or spread. It also plays a big role in why five-year survival for head and neck cancer has not improved in the past three decades.

FLLL32 is designed to sensitize cancer cells at a molecular level to the antitumor effects of cisplatin. It targets a key type of protein called STAT3 that is seen at high levels in about 82 percent of head and neck cancers. High levels of STAT3 are linked to problems with normal cell death processes, which allow cancer cells to survive chemotherapy treatment. STAT3 activation has been associated with cisplatin resistance in head and neck cancer.

Curcumin is known to inhibit STAT3 function, but it is not well-absorbed by the body. FLLL32 was developed by researchers at Ohio State University to be more amenable to use in people. The current study used the compound only in cell lines in the laboratory.

In the current study, researchers compared varying doses of cisplatin alone with varying doses of cisplatin plus FLLL32 against two sets of head and neck cancer cells: one line that was sensitive to cisplatin and one line that was resistant.

They found that FLLL32 decreased the activation levels of STAT3, sensitizing both resistant and sensitive tumor cells to cisplatin. Further, lower doses of cisplatin with FLLL32 were equally effective at killing cancer cells as the higher doses of cisplatin alone.

Separate studies suggest FLLL32 may not be well-absorbed by the body and researchers are developing a next generation compound that they hope improves on that. The U-M team plans to further study this newer compound for its potential as part of head and neck cancer treatment. Clinical trials using this compound are not currently available.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 122244.htm


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PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2011 9:56 am 
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Healthy Aging in a Pill

Animals live long and prosper when eating from a menu that puts them just this side of starvation. So far, experiments with yeast, worms, flies, spiders, fish and rodents all have shown the antiaging power of severely restricting calories. And research in rhesus monkeys suggests similar benefits in primates: One study found that monkeys eating 30 percent less than their cage mates appeared to be protected from age-related diseases and had lower mortality 15 to 20 years later. At this moment, human volunteers at three different U.S. sites have given up 25 percent of normal daily calories to test whether the less-food, longer-life phenomenon applies to people as well.

Yet even if the human experiment confirms that it’s possible to diet your way to a 120-year life span, a society accustomed to supersizing probably isn’t going to replace an order of fries with a stick of celery. So scientists are looking for shortcuts that people could use to achieve the antiaging windfall of calorie restriction without actually having to do it — a way to eat your cake and survive it, too.

A drug that postpones aging could also have profound health benefits, since most common diseases (such as cancer, heart disease and dementia) accompany old age. “That’s what’s driving us,” says Donald Ingram, head of the nutritional neuroscience and aging laboratory at Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, La. “We would like to see some kind of a product that would promote healthy aging.”

So far, scientists have singled out a handful of synthetic and natural compounds that appear to trigger the same biochemical mechanisms that kick in when cells are partially starved of nutrients, part of a coping mechanism that protects against stress. Some, such as resveratrol (a substance found in red grapes and wine), have already reached an almost pop-star status because of their antiaging potential. Others are lower profile but similarly promising. It’s still too soon to know whether any of the compounds will work at all, much less work safely.

Interestingly, the race to put time in a bottle has not been deterred by the fact that the mechanism of growing old is still largely a mystery. So too is the way that a drastic drop in calories pushes the slow-motion button.

“I’ve been in the field 15 years now, and it’s amazing how theories come and go very quickly. There isn’t a central agreed theory about what aging is at the moment. But I think in the next decade we’ll know,” says David Gems, a biologist at the Institute of Healthy Aging at University College London. When it comes to caloric restriction, “the thing you have to understand is that we don’t really know how it works.” Much of the research is housed at universities and government research labs, but a small antiaging biotech industry (populated largely by current and former academics) has also sprung up.

When food is scarce

Many leaps into the antiaging market seek to mimic biochemical reactions that occur naturally in cells when eating slows way down. While the script remains incomplete, research has uncovered some key molecular players — such as the family of enzymes known as sirtuins, which are the target of resveratrol. When food intake plummets, emergency alarms go off inside a cell. “There are energy sensors somewhere that turn on some genes and turn off other genes,” says George Roth, formerly at the National Institute on Aging and now the CEO at GeroScience, a Maryland-based biotech firm trying to develop an antiaging drug. This genetic fire drill appears to protect tissues from normal wear and tear. To scientists, each gene switched off or on offers a possible antiaging bull’s-eye.

“A lot of compounds have come down the pike,” says Ingram, who helped found GeroScience. Some approaches have already lost favor, such as the idea of short-circuiting aging solely through antioxidants, chemicals that neutralize damaging molecules called free radicals. Many “were built around the antioxidant hypothesis, and just have gone nowhere.”

The antioxidant approach probably didn’t pay off because it was too simple an answer for a complex problem. The body ages for many reasons, and more than one are tied to calorie intake. During times of plenty, the body doesn’t seem to protect itself as much from the harmful by-products shed during the business of daily living. When food is scarce, protection matters most.

Overeating probably also fuels disease in indirect ways, by inciting inflammation or raising insulin levels, which in turn helps stoke energy-hungry tumors. Ingram and Roth wrote in the February-March Experimental Gerontology that any antiaging drug must have a global impact on chemical reactions in the body, just as calorie restriction does. “Our perspective has always been that aging operates on multiple mechanisms,” Ingram says.

The GeroScience research focuses on the processing of glucose, the body’s source of energy. Of special interest is mannoheptulose, a compound which occurs naturally in avocados, though Roth says it degrades quickly once the fruit ripens. Mannoheptulose partially turns off hexokinase, an enzyme that ignites a series of chemical reactions, known as the glycolytic pathway, when glucose enters a cell. Starving a cell of hexokinase is like sending a chemical memo that less energy is coming in. At a meeting in 2009, Roth reported unpublished data showing that mice fed mannoheptulose lived about 30 percent longer on average than normal mice, even though the groups consumed the same number of calories.

Products based on mannoheptulose may be years away from use in man, but maybe not in man’s best friend. Roth and colleagues reported at the 2010 Experimental Biology meeting that mannoheptulose appears to be biologically active in dogs. The team won’t discuss further details because GeroScience has now joined with Procter & Gamble’s pet food division to explore commercial use.

An antiaging dog food wouldn’t just allow people to keep their canine companions longer. Since dogs have shorter life spans than people, an antiaging effect would be evident sooner in dogs. “We think that a compound like mannoheptulose or a glycolytic inhibitor is going to be superior to any of the products that are out there, because of the fact that it does work somewhat similarly to true caloric restriction,” Ingram says.

But mannoheptulose isn’t the only natural substance that appears to mimic a state of calorie restriction. The most headline-grabbing compound of the bunch has been the sirtuin-targeting resveratrol.

Celebrity compounds under fire

In cells, sirtuins have a day job of stripping acetyl groups (small carbon-rich chemical bunches) from proteins. Most important, the enzymes are particularly busy during times of mild stress, such as when calorie intake drops. Somehow, for reasons that are still being worked out, cells awash in sirtuins are more protected from damage.

“When we are obese, the body gets lazy and turns those protections off,” says David Sinclair, who studies aging at Harvard Medical School in Boston. A decade of research has suggested that sirtuins may help shield the body from a number of afflictions, including diabetes, stroke and even neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

Sirtuins’ path to stardom began in 2003 with a report in Nature, in which Sinclair and his colleagues announced that resveratrol could artificially stimulate sirtuins. Thus began the quest to develop an artificial, more potent incarnation of resveratrol. In 2004, Sinclair helped form the company Sirtris with this goal. (The pharmaceutical giant Glaxo­SmithKline bought Sirtris in 2008 for $720 million.) Although seven different forms of sirtuins exist in humans, most antiaging research has zeroed in on one called SIRT1.

The role of sirtuins in aging is still highly debated, so much so that in August of last year Science featured a pointed letter volley over whether it was justified to omit sirtuins from a review of the biology of aging published a few months earlier. The problem is that resveratrol and the sirtuins haven’t convincingly shown that they can lengthen life, as opposed to simply protecting against diseases that shorten life prematurely. The distinction may sound trivial, but in antiaging research, the two concepts are very different.

Adding to resveratrol’s woes is the fact that some scientists have raised doubts about whether the results seen in studies of resveratrol and its experimental cousins are valid. For example, in 2010 in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers from Pfizer Global Research and Development described experiments questioning whether the effect was a testing artifact or resveratrol and three other Sirtris compounds actually activated SIRT1. “Our present data are significant for the field as we provided strong evidence that neither the Sirtris series nor resveratrol are direct SIRT1 activators,” the team wrote.

Sinclair points to a follow-up study published in the same journal in October 2010 from Sirtris scientists that reached the exact opposite conclusion. So at Sirtris, the research continues undaunted. Last December, the company abandoned a study of one SIRT1 activator called SRT501, but testing of other activators is continuing in human trials. SRT501 was being tested in patients with multiple myeloma, some of whom developed kidney problems.

Targeting cell growth

Less controversial, but toting its own baggage, is the drug rapamycin. It has the advantage of already being on the market and having an almost undisputed record of lengthening life span in animals. The drug has long been prescribed to transplant patients because it helps guard against rejection. It has also been investigated in cancer treatment because it has the capacity to starve tumors of nutrients — and indeed, transplant patients taking rapamycin appear to have a lower cancer risk.

Rapamycin inhibits a series of reactions in a cell that begins with a protein called (in a practical bit of nomenclature) “target of rapamycin,” or TOR. The TOR chemical pathway is one of life’s fundamental processes; it exists in some form from yeast to mammals, where it is designated mTOR, and helps regulate cell growth, the production of ribosomes (cellular protein factories) and protein turnover. mTOR, in turn, activates a protein called S6K1.

In 2009, a team led by British researchers reported in Science that mice with mutations that left them without any functional S6K1 lived longer. Just as significant, genes in the mice were switched off and on in patterns consistent with calorie restriction. A study in Nature in 2009 reported that rapamycin could extend life span in mice, even when the drug was given during older age. Last year, writing in Cell Metabolism, European researchers reported that rapamycin also extends the life span of flies, while another report in the American Journal of Pathology described an extension of life span in cancer-prone mice.

“As far as rapamycin goes, it works,” says Luigi Fontana, a physician and calorie restriction researcher at Washington University in St. Louis. “By giving rapamycin, you are telling the cells that there is not enough energy.” But rapamycin has its drawbacks. Most notably, the drug is given to transplant patients because it suppresses the immune system. This hasn’t been an issue in mice because the animals are housed in pathogen-free environments. “Human beings are not living in pathogen-free facilities,” Fontana says. “I would never take rapamycin.”

The immune system concerns will probably keep the drug, at least in its current form, off the antiaging market. “It will not be prescribed to healthy people because it is labeled as an immuno­suppressant,” says Mikhail Blagosklonny, a scientist studying cell stress biology at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, N.Y. “This is enough to make people scared.” Blagosklonny (who has helped form a company, Tartis-Aging, to develop rapamycin as an antiaging drug) believes that in the smaller doses that would be given to healthy people, rapamycin would not dampen the immune system. Writing last year in Cell Cycle, he even went so far as to say that “taken together with its ability to suppress cellular aging and to increase life span, this may call to re-label rapamycin from immuno­suppressant to aging­suppressant (gerosuppressant).”

If that doesn’t happen, the body’s biology offers plenty of other targets for drugs. Acting on the body’s system of glucose detection and insulin production, the diabetes drug metformin has also been an attractive antiaging candidate. And in the future, scientists may be able to capitalize on the signals from mitochondria (a cell’s energy factories) that affect life span independently of calorie restriction. In January, researchers from the Salk Institute for Biological Sciences and the Scripps Research Institute, both in La Jolla, Calif., announced in Cell that they had pinpointed a chemical distress signal put out by mitochondria that lengthened the life span of worms. In the experiment, the signal was produced only in the intestine and nerve cells, yet affected the entire organism.

Should any new compound reach commercial development, scientists acknowledge that the resulting antiaging drug would still face hurdles to reach the aging public. A drug that might be taken in otherwise healthy people, perhaps for years, would need to demonstrate it was safe beyond doubt.

Calorie restriction exists at the twilight between health enhancement and outright starvation, so a compound would have to be precisely calibrated. If the body gets too strong a signal that energy is low, organs may fail. Scientists have known since a study in 1950 that people who reduce calories by 50 percent can experience depression, apathy, slower movement and other detrimental effects.

It’s also clear that tinkering with the aging mechanism might have unexpected side effects. Ingram and colleagues identified one promising glycolytic inhibitor more than a decade ago, while he was still at the National Institute on Aging. Called 2-deoxyglucose, it fared well in early tests but was later found in animal studies to be toxic to the heart and to increase mortality.

So for now, people are left to protect their aging bodies the old-fashioned way, by exercising enough and not eating too much. In the battle against aging, it remains to be seen whether the future will offer a bigger menu.

Averages and outliers Jeanne Calment of France was 122 when she died in 1997, making her the longest-lived person known. That a small percentage of people live beyond 110 raises the possibility of extending average human life span and motivates scientists’ search for antiaging drugs. For 2009, global average life span was 68. But substantial differences exist: The map shows average life expectancies for people born between 2005 and 2010, broken down by country.

http://www.sciencenews.org/view/feature ... _in_a_Pill


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PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2011 8:55 am 
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HOW MULBERRY JUICE CAN HELP SHRINK THE WRINKLES

BLUEBERRIES, blackberries and cranberries have all had their day in the sun, now the latest fruit to be hailed a superfood is the ­mulberry.

It is packed with anti-ageing properties that could give skin back its youthful bloom and even reduce the onset of wrinkles and grey hair, experts believe.

Tests have shown the mulberry contains up to 79 per cent more antioxidants than other superfruits.

It also has resveratrol, which gives red wine its health-boosting properties. The compound has been found to stop vision deteriorating, help reduce the risk of lung cancer, protect against colon and prostate cancers and slow ageing.

Resveratrol is thought to work by cleansing the body of pollutants and other contaminants.

Researchers at Brunswick Laboratories in the US found mulberry juice contained more than twice as many antioxidants as orange and cranberry juice, or a handful of blueberries.

The antioxidant level of a food or drink was measured using the Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity.

The system’s inventors found that not-from-concentrate mulberry juice had an Orac value of 530 per fluid ounce.

Orange and cranberry juices had an Orac score of 250, apple juice 130 and grapefruit 450.

The research was commissioned by The Progressive Food Company to mark the launch of its mulberry drink, Mul-be.

Spokesman Paul Green said: “Mulberries have been used since ancient times to protect people from colds and other ailments, so I’m not surprised the fruit is a rich source of antioxidants.

“Antioxidants are known for aiding the immune system which protects the body against germs and viruses. But they’re also a viable alternative to botox and other medical procedures thanks to their anti-ageing properties. ­Resveratrol is believed to help but not everyone wants to drink wine all the time to benefit from it, so mulberry juice is a refreshing, non-alcoholic alternative.”

Nutritionist Anita Bean said: “Drinking a glass of mulberry juice every day will help boost antioxidant levels in the body which is thought to help prevent or reduce cell damage caused by oxidation.

“Mulberries really are the next generation of superfruits.”

http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/247 ... e-wrinkles


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PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2011 4:19 pm 
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Could This Superfruit Compound Be the New Resveratrol?

It’s likely you have never heard of pterostilbene. This natural compound is most commonly found in purple fruits like blueberries and grapes and is a cousin to the well-known anti-aging nutrient, resveratrol. Similar in chemical structure, the two nutrients perform different functions in the blood and at the cellular level to lower the risk from heart disease, diabetes, cancer and the aging process itself. Pterostilbene is easily able to enter the cellular matrix to prevent the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that fuel aging and metabolic decline. Both nutrients can be obtained from a well balanced diet, but supplementation may be necessary to optimize a myriad of health benefits.

Pterostilbene Reverses Insulin Resistance and Metabolic Dysfunction

Known as a stilbenoid, pterostilbene participates in anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory reactions to protect the delicate insulin secreting beta cells in the pancreas. This helps to prevent damaging blood sugar surges that promote metabolic dysfunction and diabetes. In addition, the nutrient works in synergy with resveratrol to lower triglycerides and moderate the small dense LDL cholesterol particles that become trapped in the arterial walls and result in heart-clogging plaque.

Reporting in the Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition, researchers found that pterostilbene was capable of assisting beta cell regranulation that helps regulate the normal secretion of insulin in response to blood sugar fluctuations. Scientists demonstrated that the compound neutralized the effect of free radicals that damage beta cells after a meal high in sugar and refined carbohydrates. This capability helped to increase insulin response and reverse the damaging effects of insulin resistance commonly seen in diabetics.

Super Nutrient Inhibits Arterial Plaque Formation

Atherosclerosis is characterized by the abnormal proliferation of cells within the endothelial lining of the coronary arteries that lead to plaque formation. Pterostilbene has been shown to inhibit this deadly process in a study published in the journal Vascular Pharmacology. Researchers found that the compound regulated DNA of the smooth muscles that make up the inner lining of the arteries so plaque was less likely to accumulate. The study authors concluded that “pterostilbene may be a potential anti-proliferative agent for the treatment of atherosclerosis.”

Pterostilbene Regulates Normal Cell Death, Prevents Many Cancer Lines

Pterostilbene is emerging as a powerful ally in the fight against many cancer lines due to its small molecular size that allows the nutrient to easily gain access to cancer cells. Researchers publishing in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that pterostilbene “damages a cancer cell`s membrane and DNA and induces death signals causing self-destruction.” The nutrient has demonstrated the ability to suppress the energy-producing system within the cancer cell to protect against cancers of the breast, prostate, colon, lung and liver.

Pterostilbene functions by affecting multiple cellular mechanisms to enhance human health and lower risk from diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Like its close relative resveratrol, this super nutrient is found in small concentrations in muscadine and red varietal grapes as well as many members of the dark berry family including blueberries and cranberries. Health-minded individuals may want to consider supplementation to obtain the higher research dosage (.125 mg) shown to prevent chronic disease and extend healthy lifespan.

http://www.stopagingnow.com/liveintheno ... esveratrol


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PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2011 5:31 pm 
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Blueberries, resveratrol and cocoa flavanols aid weight management goals

(NaturalNews) A wealth of new scientific evidence shines a critical light on the importance of natural foods and nutritional compounds in the fight against overweight, obesity and weight maintenance. Virtually all alternative health experts agree, the current epidemic of weight control issues plaguing western society are the result of excess consumption of highly processed convenience foods that have replaced vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds in the diet. Three independent studies conclude that blueberries, resveratrol from red grapes and cocoa flavanols exert a potent effect on fat cell formation that can aid in weight loss and management goals when included as part of your daily diet.

Blueberries have been well documented for their cognitive and cardio-protective benefits, due in large part to the potent complex of anthocyanins that give the berry its deep blue color. Researchers reporting the results of a study to the Experimental Biology 2011 conference have found that blueberries may hold the key to resolving one of the largest threats to human health this century - overweight and obesity.

Scientists determined that extracts of the berry compound inhibited the formation of new baby fat cells (adipocytes) in a dose-dependent manner. Less adipocytes mean there are fewer `containers` to store triglycerides from the blood, and this is an ultimately powerful mechanism to lower or help maintain body weight. Not only did blueberry extract supplementation reduce the number of adipocytes up to 73 percent, but the compound was also found to assist in the breakdown of lipids and fats for removal from the body.

Polyphenols from the cocoa plant have been shown to promote cardiovascular, skin and brain health in recent studies. Research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry provide evidence that extracts of the cacao bean, particularly the flavanol epicatechin, are potent inhibitors of enzymes that break down carbohydrates during digestion.

Study authors determined the compound exerted an effect in a dose-dependent fashion, noting "the more consumed, the greater the effect." They were also careful to conclude that chocolate and cocoa are two very different terms with the distinction that cocoa is the non-fat component of cocoa liquor, and the carbohydrate-inhibiting effect is not seen when sugar-infused milk chocolate sources are used. A minimum cocoa content of 55% is necessary for health and weight management concerns.

Resveratrol, the bioactive compound found most commonly in the skins of red grapes, is shown to reduce body fat formation by preventing the formation of fat tissue in a study published in the journal Nutrition and Metabolism. The compound is known to positively affect cognitive functions and extend natural lifespan by regulating the longevity gene SIRT1. Researchers explain that ingesting resveratrol at supplemental doses (50 mg per day) for a period of six weeks caused a significant reduction in the activity of enzymes linked to fat production in the body.

Effective weight loss and management requires a combination of lifestyle and dietary modifications. Natural foods and dietary nutrients such as blueberries, resveratrol and cocoa compounds provide a safe and powerful mechanism to achieve long-term weight reduction goals.

http://www.naturalnews.com/032506_resve ... ement.html


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PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2011 3:28 pm 
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Researchers evaluate red wine compound for treating concussions in pro boxers

DALLAS – May 26, 2011 – UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers are engaging the help of professional boxers and trainers to study whether a component in red wine and grapes could help reduce the short- and long-term effects of concussions.

Researchers plan to recruit about two dozen professional boxers to take the neuroprotective compound resveratrol after a fight to see if it reduces damage to the brain after impact and helps restore subtle brain functions and connections via its antioxidant effects. If successful, researchers hope the results may be applicable not only to concussions in other sports such as football and hockey, but also to everyday incidents such as falls, auto accidents and other blows to the head.

"We know from animal studies that if we give the drug immediately after or soon after a brain injury, it can dramatically and significantly reduce the damage you see long term," said Dr. Joshua Gatson, assistant professor of surgery in Burn/Trauma/Critical Care and principal investigator for the study. "There haven't been any completed human studies yet, so this is really the first look at resveratrol's effect on traumatic brain injury."

Resveratrol is already being studied as an agent to lower blood sugar levels, for use against cancer, to protect cardiovascular health, and in stroke and Alzheimer's disease treatments.

"Even though resveratrol is found in red wine, you would need 50 glasses of wine to get the required dose to get the protection you would need," said Dr. Gatson.

He came up with the idea for the trial, called the REPAIR study, while watching ESPN. Being a sports fan, he saw frequent concussion issues in football.

"The only treatment available is rest and light exercise, but there is no drug therapy to protect the brain from consecutive concussions, which are actually a lot worse than the initial one," said Dr. Gatson, who investigates biomarkers and novel therapies for traumatic brain injury. "There's been a lot of work with resveratrol showing that it also protects the brain, so we thought this might be the ideal drug."

In this study, researchers are administering the required oral dose once a day for seven days. Pro boxers will take a supplement form of resveratrol within two hours of their match. Researchers will then use neurocognitive tests and novel MRI protocols to track subtle brain activity, inflammation, and restoration of cells and connections.

"The main goal of our research is to protect the brain after each episode so that we can decrease the cumulative effect of these sports concussions," Dr. Gatson said.

Because boxers can have several fights in a short period of time, the researchers decided to target pro boxers with the help of Joseph Mohmed, the study research coordinator, and a coach for USA Boxing, the governing body for all amateur boxing, including the Olympics. Mr. Mohmed also is a former facilities manager at UT Southwestern.

According to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, 2009 figures showed that 446,788 sports-related head injuries were treated at U.S. hospital emergency rooms, an increase of nearly 95,000 from the year before, in sports ranging from diving and cycling to baseball, basketball, soccer and football. The annual incidence of football-related concussion in the U.S. is estimated at 300,000, with about 47,000 football-related head injuries treated in hospital emergency rooms. In addition, more than 85,000 people were treated for bicycle-related head injuries; about two-thirds of 600 bicycling deaths a year are attributed to traumatic brain injury.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/ ... 052511.php


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PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 2:46 pm 
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Have Your Wine and Supplement It, Too

Resveratrol, an antioxidant found in red wine and grapes, has become the new health buzz term of late, with everything from supplements to skin care, including the small chain amino acids in their formulas. Touting anti-aging, heart disease prevention and fat-fighting benefits, incorporating resveratrol into diet may seem like a no brainer; however, deciding how and where to obtain it can be a little more perplexing.

The majority of consumers familiar with resveratrol immediately associate it with red wine. Much like the old adage an apple a day, a glass of red wine a day has been theorized to delay the proverbial doctor as it relates to aging, and heart disease-related illnesses. Researchers at the Harvard Medical School and the National Institute of Aging (NIA) report resveratrol does offset the bad effects of a high-calorie diet, and significantly extends life spans;1 but before you tell your shoppers to raise a glass, it is important to note the average person will not consume the amount of red wine needed to reap any resveratrol related health benefits. In most cases, the 0.2 to 5.8 mg/L of rapidly metabolizing resveratrol will be eliminated prior to its absorption into the body’s cells.

In a study conducted by Harvard and the NIA to show the anti-aging and fat-fighting ability of resveratrol, researchers dispensed almost 1,700 mg of resveratrol to laboratory mice with significant results.2 The high doses of resveratrol prevented negative health causes, but the equivalent of that dosage would be roughly a thousand glasses of red wine.

Leading physicians, including popular expert Dr. Oz, have publicly encouraged resveratrol supplements.3 Derived from grape skins and seeds, red wine, or Japanese knotweed extracts—the growing crop of supplements containing resveratrol—promise a host of benefits, from anti-aging to promoting weigh-loss, extending life and improving overall health.

Approximately 50 percent of Americans are already taking a supplement, so the thought of adding on another may be a little hard to swallow. However, thanks to natural product developers such as the Weil Foundation, Bainbridge & Knight, Source Naturals, Longevity, etc., there are a growing group of healthy, multipronged dietary supplements that fuse high ORAC value super fruits with effective, clinically sound weight-loss and health improving ingredients, such as resveratrol, to synergistically achieve desired health outcomes. Antioxidant supplements are now being recommended by many health care specialists, especially for the growing elderly population, smokers and individuals with immune problems, to reverse adverse health outcomes and protect against further onset.

If your customers are currently taking multiple supplements, instead of adding on, it may be advantageous to select a more comprehensive supplement such as Lichi Super Fruit with lychee, acai, green tea extracts and resveratrol in addition to a healthy diet and regular exercise. Eating a diet rich in lush dark purple fruits and vegetables such as grapes, purple cabbage,and blueberries, which all contain resveratrol, can definitely provide healthy benefits, too.

http://www.naturalproductsmarketplace.c ... t-too.aspx


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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2011 7:21 pm 
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Study of resveratrol, found in red wine, began in November

SCRANTON - The fruit of the vine has proven healthy for lab mice in past studies, but Marywood University researchers are wondering if red wine’s key ingredient will benefit people.

“It’s all well and good if you can help a mouse live longer,” says assistant professor of exercise physiology James Smoliga, Ph.D. But he said research is now focusing on how the ingredient affects man.

Smoliga is heading the university’s study of the ingredient resveratrol. Volunteers in the research don’t imbibe but instead take a supplement, with each pill containing as much resveratrol as 100 glasses of red wine.

Resveratrol is an antioxidant in red wine that might help protect the lining of the heart’s blood vessels and possibly protect against obesity and diabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic’s Web site.

“It’s a very promising supplement to research,” he said. Smoliga, 33, said resveratrol studies began after researchers wondered how the French could consume high fat diets without the heart disease associated with it.

“People came up with, ‘It must be the red wine.’”

He said much research the past decade has focused on the effects of resveratrol on lab animals. “It seems like a miracle drug. It sounds too good to be true,” he said. But Smoliga said there is now increased research on humans.

Marywood’s study began in November and includes 44 volunteers. Smoliga said it wasn’t difficult to recruit local subjects, ages 18 to 75.

“We did quite well with it,” he said.

To avoid any bias in the study, Smoliga said, “I try to know as little as possible about the subjects.”

“We’ve taken healthy people who don’t have any type of known disease,” he added.

Volunteers take daily doses of the supplement at home for two months and provide blood samples. The study measures the function of the participants’ blood vessels and cardiac function. A dexascan examines bone density, and a memory test is also included.

He credits Kathy Uhranowsky, lab manager/lab nurse; graduate research assistants Sarah Wherry and Chuck Fisher, all of Marywood; and Joseph Baur, assistant professor of physiology at the University of Pennsylvania, who analyzes blood samples for the project. “Without them it would be almost impossible to do it,” Smoliga said.

The company Vinomis is sponsoring the study in which their supplement Vindure is being used. Smoliga said volunteers will be tested throughout June.

“Then the real fun begins as far as analyzing things. Optimistically I would say sometime in mid-August I’ll have some answers,” he said.

He already has some theories about the findings. Smoliga said resveratrol might not produce any changes in healthy people but it might help those with pre-diabetic conditions, chronic inflammation and cardiac disease.

“There’s a lot riding on the results of this.”

Marywood’s findings will be presented and published, but what happens next depends on what this research yields.

“There’s a good chance we’ll be doing similar studies in the future,” he said.

Another Marywood study is examining the effects of interval training on weight loss and lung function, he said. Upcoming research will help determine the effects of ginger on preventing muscle damage after exercise and the use of exercise as a treatment for carbon monoxide poisoning.

Smoliga, who also has a doctor of veterinary medicine, said he initially wanted to work with race horses and sled dogs. He then earned a doctorate in human physiology and put aside working with four-legged creatures.

“The human side interested me.”

http://www.timesleader.com/golackawanna ... -2011.html


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PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2011 7:54 pm 
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'Free home trial' offers cost unwary consumers a bundle

Dear Action Line: I responded to a "free home trial" offer of health supplements containing "resveratrol" (the "healthful ingredient in red wine") and was later charged $80 on my credit card. What can be done about this? - T.P., Tulsa.

The Federal Trade Commission brought a law enforcement action against Jesse Willms, an Alberta, Canada, man and 10 online companies he controls that allegedly raked in more than $450 million from consumers in the U.S., Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand. They lured consumers with "free" offers and charged them for products and services they did not want or agree to purchase.

An FTC Bureau of Consumer Protection press release said " 'Free' must really mean 'free' no matter where the offer is made." The FTC worked closely with Canadian law enforcement, including the Alberta Partnership Against Cross Border Fraud, while investigating this international scheme. Most of the defendants are located in Alberta.

The "free trials" involved acai berry weight-loss pills, teeth whiteners, health supplements containing "resveratrol," work-at-home schemes, government grants, free credit reports and penny auctions. (Penny auctions are online auctions in which consumers must purchase bids, usually for $0.50 to $1 each.) There is no accepted data to form a scientific basis for application of resveratrol to mammals as an anti-aging agent.

The FTC said Willms and his companies obtained consumers' credit or debit card account numbers, by enticing them with bogus "free" or "risk-free" trial offers that supposedly required only small shipping and handling fees, and also promised phony "bonus" offers just for signing up. Consumers had no reason to believe they would be charged for the trial product or the bonus products, but they were often charged for the free trial plus a monthly recurring fee of $79.95. Consumers were also charged monthly recurring fees for the bonus offers.

The defendants allegedly contracted with affiliate marketers whose banner ads, pop-ups, sponsored search terms, and unsolicited email led consumers to the defendants' websites, and the defendants paid the affiliates for each consumer whose credit or debit card was charged. The defendants allegedly made false claims about the total cost of products, recurring charges and the availability of refunds.

The complaint was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington at Seattle naming Jesse Willms, Peter Graver, Adam Sechrist, Brett Callister, Carey L. Milne; 1021018 Alberta Ltd., dba Just Think Media, Credit Report America, eDirect Software, WuLongsource and Wuyi Source; 1016363 Alberta Ltd., dba Software; 1524948 Alberta Ltd., dba Terra Marketing Group, Circle Media Bids Limited, dba SwipeBids.com, SwipeAuctions.com, and Selloffauctions.com; Coastwest Holdings Ltd.; Farend Services Ltd.; JDW Media LLC; Net Soft Media LLC, and True Net LLC.

The FTC also charged that Willms and companies made false weight-loss and cancer-cure claims for products and touted bogus endorsements by Oprah Winfrey and Rachael Ray and violated the Electronic Fund Transfer Act and Regulation E by debiting consumers' bank accounts without their signed written consent. Watch the 2 minute 55 second FTC video "Scam watch: free trial offers" at tulsaworld.com/FTCfreetrialscams

http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/article. ... earA880499


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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2011 4:50 pm 
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FDA targets supplement manufacturers, falsely accuses them of selling drugs

(NaturalNews) In the eyes of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there is no difference between a legitimate, scientifically-backed health claim, and a phony, made-up claim, as it concerns food and dietary supplements. Only FDA-approved drugs, you see, provide real health benefits, according to the agency. And in its continued assault against health freedom, the FDA has sent warning letters to five different companies that produce natural treatments and cures for sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs) because those companies dared to make unauthoried health claims, many of which are backed by peer-reviewed, journal-published scientific studies.

The companies being targeted -- MedaVir, Herpaflor, Viruxo Anti-Viral Support, C-Cure, and Never an Outbreak -- all made the mistake of telling their customers about the health benefits of their products without going through the laborious, multi-million dollar FDA drug approval process. As a result, the FDA has accused them all of selling unapproved drugs, and ordered them to withdraw the statements or face further regulatory action.

What is worse, though, is the fact that the FDA has decreed that any food or dietary supplement that provides any sort of health benefit is automatically a "drug." Ordinary foods like almonds, cherries, or walnuts literally become recategorized as drugs when accompanied by claims that they cure, heal, or prevent disease -- and this is currently the law of the land in the US.

"While some of the companies market these products as dietary supplements, these products are all drug products under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act), as they are offered for the treatment of disease," stated the FDA in a press release about the STD supplements. "These drug products, which are offered for the treatment of STDs, may not be introduced into interstate commerce without an FDA-approved new drug application (NDA)."

In other words, no food or supplement product can bear health claim labels without first gaining the FDA rubber stamp of approval, and being recategorized as a drug. It does not matter if scientific studies have verified that an herb, substance or food has health-promoting properties -- if the FDA has not first been paid to approve it, then there is no place for it in the medicinal realm.

This is why groups like the Alliance for Natural Health (ANH) are urging those in the natural health community to support the Free Speech about Science Act (https://secure3.convio.net/aahf/site/Ad ... ion&id=698), which will end the censorship of legitimate science and restore freedom of speech to natural health.

http://www.naturalnews.com/032567_FDA_s ... anies.html


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2011 8:20 am 
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How Vitamins and Minerals May Prevent Age-Related Diseases

ScienceDaily (May 31, 2011) — Severe deficiency of the vitamins and minerals required for life is relatively uncommon in developed nations, but modest deficiency is very common and often not taken seriously. A new research published online in the FASEB Journal, however, may change this thinking as it examines moderate selenium and vitamin K deficiency to show how damage accumulates over time as a result of vitamin and mineral loss, leading to age-related diseases.

"Understanding how best to define and measure optimum nutrition will make the application of new technologies to allow each person to optimize their own nutrition a much more realistic possibility than it is today." said Joyce C. McCann, Ph.D., a co-author of the study from the Nutrition and Metabolism Center at Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute in Oakland, California. "If the principles of the theory, as demonstrated for vitamin K and selenium, can be generalized to other vitamins and minerals, this may provide the foundation needed."

McCann and colleagues reached their conclusions by compiling and assessing several general types of scientific evidence. They tested whether selenium-dependent proteins that are essential from an evolutionary perspective are more resistant to selenium deficiency than those that are less essential. They discovered a highly sophisticated array of mechanisms at cellular and tissue levels that, when selenium is limited, protect essential selenium-dependent proteins at the expense of those that are nonessential. They also found that mutations in selenium-dependent proteins that are lost on modest selenium deficiency result in characteristics shared by age-related diseases including cancer, heart disease, and loss of immune or brain function. Results should inform attempts to locate mechanistic linkages between vitamin or mineral deficiencies and age-related diseases by focusing attention on the vitamin and mineral-dependent proteins that are nonessential from an evolutionary perspective. Such mechanistic linkages are likely to present opportunities for treatment.

"This paper should settle any debate about the importance of taking a good, complete, multivitamin every day," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of the FASEB Journal. "As this report shows, taking a multivitamin that contains selenium is a good way to prevent deficiencies that, over time, can cause harm in ways that we are just beginning to understand."

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 115323.htm


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2011 10:08 am 
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Psych drug doctors now pushing to add lithium to drinking water

(NaturalNews) Chlorine, fluoride, and the various other chemical poisons already added to the nation's drinking water supplies are apparently not enough for the self-appointed experts whose insatiable lust to force-medicate the world is never satisfied. A recent report in The Daily offers credence to the insane notion that adding lithium, a drug currently used to treat mental disorders, to drinking water will be beneficial in helping to reduce suicide and violent crime rates.

Much like fluoride, lithium alters the brain's normal production of serotonin and norepinephrine, which in turn artificially alters the way an individual thinks and how he or she feels about a given situation. Lithium is literally a mind-altering, antidepressant chemical substance that those promoting it openly admit modifies brain function. And yet they purport that forcibly inducing these chemical changes on the unwitting populations of the world is a good and acceptable idea.

"Lithium certainly dampens impulsivity, which would explain how it reduces suicide rates," said Dr. Allan Young, a psychiatry professor at Imperial College London and big time promoter of lithium-laced water, to The Daily. "When you change these resilience factors in the brain, you see other changes too. People are less timid and shy, for example."

And in the same conversation with that reporter, Young humorously wonders with seemingly insidious arrogance why he has received slews of angry letters from the concerned public about his proposal to mass-medicate the world with this new type of drug. Could it be, Dr. Young, that people would rather think for themselves without having self-appointed "experts" like yourself superciliously play the role of God by deciding for others what they should and should not consume of their own free will?

In his push to begin poisoning water supplies with lithium, Young also cites Americans having been easily swayed to accept genetically-modified (GM) foods as a reason why the US is a "likely candidate for early implementation" of lithium-laced water. He and others are openly pushing to get lithium in the water as soon as possible in order to, as The Daily puts it, "cultivate a more serene social order."

http://www.naturalnews.com/032576_lithi ... water.html


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 03, 2011 8:08 am 
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How contraceptives cause high BP

Doctors believe the estrogen women consume as oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) pills is good for their hearts.

Recent studies, however, have shown that long-term exposure to estrogen can be a danger to women for its link with high blood pressure (BP), a key factor in heart and brain-attacks.

Although the process by which estrogen causes high BP in females is unclear, Michigan State University (MSU) researchers have found that long-term estrogen exposure generates excessive levels of a compound, superoxide, which causes stress in the body, reports the American Journal of Physiology .

Superoxide is a common reactive form of oxygen that can attack susceptible biological targets, including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, according to a Michigan statement.

The build-up of this compound occurs in an area of the brain that is crucial to regulating BP, suggesting that chronic estrogen induces a build-up of superoxide that in turn causes blood pressure to increase.

The study also found that the anti-oxidant resveratrol reverses the increase in both superoxide and blood pressure.

P.S. Mohan Kumar of Michigan State, who led the study, said: "This is an important study on at least two levels. First, it continues to confirm the negative effect that long-term estrogen exposure has for females. Second, it provides a new rationale for how and why this relationship occurs."

http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes ... raceptives


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