Resveratrol promotes health and longevity; study shows it..

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Post by kenobewan » Wed Aug 20, 2014 12:13 pm

Daffodil Day helps cancer sufferers

JULIE Saville is hoping to make a difference to the lives of those suffering from cancer.

Mrs Saville, 50, of Fairfield West, will volunteer her time this Friday as part of Daffodil Day.

She will set up a stall at Stockland Wetherill Park Shopping Centre and sell merchandise, as well as daffodils, in a bid to raise funds for the Cancer Council.

It will mark the 17th consecutive year she has taken part.

"My daughter Chloe and I will be selling badges, pens, dougal bears and fresh flowers on the day," Mrs Saville said. "I've had a lot of family and close friends die from cancer so this is something very personal to me."

Mrs Saville said it was important to raise awareness about the event to help those affected by cancer.

"Everyone tends to want to wear a badge on the day so that would be our most popular item of purchase," she said.

Her stall will be open Friday, 9am to 5pm.

The Cancer Council uses funds raised through Daffodil Day to continue its work in cancer research as well as providing patient support and prevention programs.

For more information about Daffodil Day or to make a donation, click here.

http://www.fairfieldchampion.com.au/sto ... s/?cs=1448

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Post by kenobewan » Fri Aug 22, 2014 9:29 am

Daily berry fix helps to stave off obesity, diabetes

A HANDFUL of raspberries or a cup of blueberry juice daily is the latest weapon in the worldwide fight to address the rising tide of obesity-linked diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

The groundbreaking research announced this week at the World Horticultural Congress in Brisbane by Yves Desjardins, of Canada’s Laval University, concludes that it is possible to lose 10 per cent of body weight and stop further weight gain overall by eating a handful of berries a day.

But the latest health boost offered by berries is not directly linked to their trendy “antioxidant” properties.

Instead, it is the ability of special polyphenol compounds found in high concentration in raspberries, strawberries, blackberries, blueberries and cranberries to enhance the dominance of “good” stomach and gut bacteria that helps reduce obesity.

Professor Desjardins yesterday described the research as a “paradigm shift” in approaching diet-related diseases, showing that restoring bacterial balance in the gut through food choices was central to maintaining and restoring good health.

The research also showed that the good microflora in the gut encouraged by berries altered insulin sensitivity, staving off the onset of obesity-linked type 2 diabetes and similar diseases.

“When you are obese or have a bad ‘McDonald’s’ diet, the domin­ant type of bacteria in your gut becomes quite nasty and releases fatty acids, which make you put on more weight, have a fatty, unhealthy liver and become more likely to develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome,” Professor Desjardins said.

“If you want to become lean or healthy again, you need to restore the gut balance by encouraging another group of “good” microbacteria. What we have shown is that if you consume a small amount of berries constantly for a period of time you will find significant health benefits.”

The research also showed that even people who persisted in eating a bad diet of a hamburger and cola a day — but who consumed a handful of berries or berry juice too — were unlikely to gain weight or develop diabetes as fast as people who ate the same bad diet but without the berries.

At Red Hill Berries farm near Caboolture, north of Brisbane, the picking of 10ha of plump pink raspberries grown for the Driscoll group is in full swing, under the watchful eye of farm manager Shane Hodgkiss.

Owner Richard McGruddy said he was not surprised to hear of the latest health benefits linked to berries. “The flavour and the taste that is coming through in these new varieties that we now grow is really being picked up by consumers, who know they are really healthy to eat,” he said.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/he ... 7032513787

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Post by kenobewan » Sun Aug 24, 2014 8:50 pm

The Tapeworm Diet: Pageant Mom Feeds Parasites to Daughter

The mother of a beauty pageant contestant in Florida is suspected of forcing her daughter to ingest tapeworms - in order to lose weight for competition.

At first, when the teen competitor in question show up to her local hospital emergency room with severe stomach pains, nurse Maricar Cabral-Osorio suspected the young woman was pregnant, according to a report by United Press International.

An ultrasound found no indication of a fetus, but did detect some mysterious growths in the youth's intestines.

The nature of the contestant's dilemma was revealed after an urgent trip to the ER bathroom.

Recalled Cabral-Osorio in the UPI story: "It was a toilet bowl full of tapeworms...It was so gross and she had pooped all these tapeworms. There were a couple that were very long and wiggling around trying to get out of the toilet bowl."

After eliminating the parasites from her body, the teen was expected to successfully recover.

But, how did the aspiring beauty queen manage to contract the gut worms? Her mother apparently.

It's believed by investigators a reported disagreement between mother and daughter led the mother to venture to Mexico, where she bought a pill of tapeworm eggs -- a method used by some to shed extra pounds -- and managed to get her daughter to take it before an upcoming pageant.

"We were wondering how did she get those tapeworms, and then you saw the mom turn white," Cabral-Osorio said. "The mom was apologizing to the girl. It's like 'I'm so sorry. You know, I did it just to make you a little skinnier. You needed some help before we went on to the pageant.'"

It's not yet known if the mother will face any criminal charges in connection with the incident.

Tapeworms, explains a post at medicinenet.com. "are parasitic, segmented ribbon-like worms that obtain nutrients from the digestive system of their host. They can infect many different hosts, including humans, fish, dogs, cows, pigs, and sheep."

Typically, the site continues, when humans are infected, tapeworms are "acquired by eating raw or undercooked meat from infected animals, although humans can also become infected from contaminated water or from eating food prepared and contaminated by infected individuals...once acquired, the parasite attaches to the intestinal wall of its host and absorbs nutrients as it continues to grow and produce eggs, which can be...shed in the feces. Certain tapeworms can grow up to 15-30 feet in length and live up to 20 years in the host."

Oftentimes, those infected with tapeworms show no overt symptoms, although sufferers "may experience abdominal pain, nausea, bloating, diarrhea, weakness, loss of appetite, weight loss, vitamin deficiencies, and malnutrition. Sometimes the affected individual may notice a segment of the tapeworm in their feces. More serious complications can also occur in some individuals," according to the Website.

http://www.latinpost.com/articles/19897 ... ughter.htm

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Post by kenobewan » Tue Aug 26, 2014 2:48 pm

Gut bugs 'help prevent allergies'

Bacteria which naturally live inside our digestive system can help prevent allergies and may become a source of treatment, say US researchers.

The team at the University of Chicago showed a group of bacteria - Clostridia - could block peanut allergies in mice.

They hope to harness the bacteria in a pill form - or replicate their effects with a drug - in order to treat allergies.

Experts said it was a "very exciting" discovery.

For every one cell that builds up the human body there are ten bacteria living on or in us.

There is an emerging school of thought that this "microbiome" may be helping to fuel a rise in allergies around the world.

Peanuts in mice

The research group performed experiments on mice brought up in perfectly sterile environments and had no bacteria in their gut.

These animals had a strong immune response to peanut - an allergy that can be deadly in some people.

The team then investigated whether adding different bacteria to the digestive tract of the animals had any effect.

Only the Clostridia group of bacteria - which includes some disease causing species such as C. difficle - could prevent the allergic reaction.

Lead researcher Dr Cathryn Nagler told the BBC News website: "The first step is for an allergen to gain access to the blood stream, the presence of Clostridia prevents the allergens getting into the bloodstream.

"Clostridia are known to be closely linked to the intestinal lining, they are spore forming which makes them tricky to work with, but down the road they would be a candidate to put in a to pill as they are highly stable."

Another option the researchers are investigating is finding a drug which would have the same effect as the bacteria.

Peanut butter

Can bacteria help with peanut allergies?

It is hoped that using bacteria can help with desensitisation therapies, which involve giving people regular, but tiny, doses of the substance provoking the allergic response until the immune system becomes used to it.

Previous research has suggested roles for our microbiome in everything from obesity to autism.

Dr Cathryn Nagler says we should not be surprised how powerful an effect these bacteria, fungi and viruses can have on our body.

"We have co-evolved with our microbiota and it has an enormous impact on our health.

"It's having a negative impact now because we've disturbed it with antibiotics, a high fat diet and c-sections."

Commenting on the findings, Prof Colin Hill, a microbiologist at University College Cork, told the BBC: "This is really interesting.

"This paper identifies a group of bacteria which could be important in protecting against these prevalent diseases.

"While we have to be careful not to extrapolate too far from a single study, and we also have to bear in mind that germ-free mice are a long way from humans, it is a very exciting paper and puts this theory on a much sounder scientific basis."

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-28887088

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Post by kenobewan » Thu Aug 28, 2014 10:25 am

The hospital room for people so obese, its roof had to be reinforced to bear the weight of harnesses

No ordinary piece of not particularly exciting news happened this week. Turns out there was a lot more to it than initially met the eye.

The news was that Canberra Hospital opened a new $11.5 million ward with 60 beds. That’ll happen. Canberra has a growing population, after all.

But Canberra’s population, like that of much of the western world, is expanding not just numerically but around the waistline. In short, we’re getting fat. Almost two in three Australians are now classed as overweight or obese.

That’s why hospitals are increasingly installing facilities specifically for the obese and super obese. And that’s why the new ward at Canberra Hospital is newsworthy.

ACT Chief Minister Katy Gallagher is also the territory’s Health Minister. She toured the new ward as it opened this week, tweeting a few images of the new bariatric facilities. Bariatrics is the branch of medicine which deals with obesity, and Canberra Hospital now has four fully-equipped bariatric rooms.

“Three of them are for people up to 250 kilos with lifting devices for people of that size,” she told news.com.au. “The other room is the ‘super bariatric’ room. It’s for patients who weigh up to 500 kilos.”

To put 500 kilos into perspective, it’s more or less the weight of a small racehorse. Last month, walls of a Sydney man’s home had to be partially demolished in order for him to be taken to hospital. He was said to weigh somewhere between 300 and 400 kilos and was driven away in a special bariatric ambulance fitted with a hydraulic lift.

According to Katy Gallagher, the Canberra Hospital ‘super bariatric’ room has a reinforced roof in order to support a harness which moves patients around the room and to the bathroom with its oversized toilet.

“It’s hard to get your mind across the impact that being that size would have on your lifestyle,” Mrs Gallagher said.

“You wouldn’t be able to walk or move easily, so imagine how humiliating it would be in a non purpose-built room. At least this gives some dignity to people.”

We contacted the Australian Medical Association to attempt to quantify the number of such bariatric facilities Australia-wide, but there appear to be no statistics available. We do know that virtually every major Australian hospital has bariatric facilities now. Katy Gallagher told us that she has opened three community health centres in the ACT this year alone, and they all have bariatric facilities.

We also know that Australia’s most populous state, NSW, has six bariatric ambulances.

As for super bariatric facilities, Canberra’s might just be unique. “I haven’t heard of one,” Mrs Gallagher said. “The roof had to be reinforced so it’s a whole new layer of building design.”

And a whole new era in healthcare too.

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health ... 7039432995

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Post by kenobewan » Sat Aug 30, 2014 9:21 am

The best way to brush your teeth? Don’t ask your dentist

SOME demand a circular motion, others call for a 45-degree angle, and there are still advocates for the horizontal scrub. Yet dentists have no real idea of the best way to brush your teeth, scientists say.

“There is no evidence to suggest that complicated techniques are any better than a simple, gentle scrub,” says Professor Aubrey Sheiham, of University College London. A survey of dozens of studies for an article in the British Dental Journal reveals that even brushing after eating sweets or sugary drinks makes little difference to tooth decay. Ensuring toothpaste contains fluoride is more important than any brushing technique. Sheiham says the contradictory advice on brushing technique offered by dental organisations worldwide isn’t just confusing; it is “undermining faith and trust in the profession”.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/fe ... 7039147789

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Post by kenobewan » Mon Sep 01, 2014 12:02 pm

Healthy habits that hold back the clock

We might think of Botox and cosmetic repair jobs as the big guns in the anti-ageing armoury, but how about a different approach – like picking up a set of dumb bells and putting down that bag of chips? There's growing evidence that what we do to boost our health on the inside can improve how we look on the outside too.

Sticking to a healthy body weight is a start but there's more to looking good at 40, 50, 60 and beyond than owning the same waist size you had at 20. Expanding middles aren't the only body change that can come with age - there's the gradual drooping that comes with gravity and muscle loss which is where strength training helps you fight back.

By building muscle, regular resistance training using your own body weight or weights such as dumb bells, barbells and kettle bells, helps maintain a perkier upper body as well as firmer arms and legs and flatter abs, says Michelle Drielsma, a Sydney-based exercise physiologist and strength coach.

"Including posture improvement exercises as part of your training can also help to give you a taller, more upright look. Good posture exercises include dead lifts and other exercises that target the back and the lower abdominals," says Drielsma who recommends a couple of sessions with a strength coach or personal trainer to learn the correct technique.

Then there's the effect of strength training on hormones such as human growth hormone and testosterone, both of which decline with age.

"Studies have found that resistance training raises levels of these hormones in both men and women - although not to the point of creating female hulks," she says. "Both those hormones are important for burning fat more efficiently and for building muscle.

"More muscle also means more energy-producing mitochondria in our cells – and that means we have a higher metabolic rate which helps prevent gathering extra kilos."

But the aesthetic advantage of more muscle and less fat is just the frosting on the cake. There are also the health benefits like a body that functions better. Good posture, for instance, keeps our bones in their anatomically correct position, reducing wear and tear on joints, Drielsma says.

Better insulin sensitivity is another plus. This means your body doesn't need to produce more insulin than necessary – and that's a good thing.

"Less insulin circulating in the bloodstream means you have less of this fat-storing hormone floating about and less chance of developing lifestyle related conditions such as Type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome or obesity," she says.

As for how we eat, research into potentially harmful compounds formed in food during cooking or food manufacturing points to another reason to eat more fresh whole food. We're less likely to accumulate too many of these compounds, called Advanced Glycation End Products or AGEs, that have been linked to skin ageing.

AGEs occur naturally in the body at low levels and can also result from the high blood sugar levels that come with diabetes or pre-diabetes. AGEs are also in many common foods, especially anything baked, fried or toasted or high in animal fat. Baked crunchy processed foods tend to be high in AGEs, as are coffee and Coke and foods containing emulsifiers – additives that help keep oil and vinegar together in foods like mayonnaise, says Professor Josephine Forbes from Queensland's Mater Medical Research Institute.

It's early days for research into AGEs' effects, but studies suggest that along with harming the immune system, arteries and kidneys, high levels of AGEs can accelerate skin ageing by attacking the collagen that gives skin elasticity and strength.

"There are some convincing, although small studies about the AGEs content of foods and disease development but the science still needs to better understand how AGEs are absorbed by the gut, where they go from there and how this results in damage to the body," Forbes says. "We also need more large scale trials before we start lobbying groups such as the Food and Grocery Council about levels of AGEs in food. That said, we need to do the research sooner rather than later – the public has the right to be informed about the effects that seemingly benign food processing has on food.

"Meanwhile, a good way of eating to keep the levels of AGEs low in food is a Mediterranean style diet where cold pressed oils, fresh produce and simple cooking styles with high moisture levels are on the menu. Japanese food is another great example."

http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/diet-an ... 09z7a.html

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Post by kenobewan » Wed Sep 03, 2014 1:28 pm

Teen Diagnosed With Cancer Looks for Cure as Researcher

After being diagnosed with Stage IV cancer at age 14, Lauren Bedesky has been fighting the disease as a patient for most of her teen years. It wasn’t until this summer that Bedesky got to fight cancer on an entirely new front -- by working in a cancer research lab.

As an intern at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, Bedesky was able to run experiments and explore potential new cancer treatments.

Under the direction of cancer researcher Dr. Dean Lee, Bedesky, she was able to research the same kind of tumor -- a type of brain cancer called neuroblastoma, she was diagnosed with in 2012.

“I thought it was really cool, we actually drew my own blood,” Bedesky told ABC News of her experiments. “We grew cells and could see how well my own cells were able to kill the tumor.”

Bedesky said she wanted to work in a cancer research lab after seeing firsthand how many pediatric patients had received treatments made for adults patients.

“In the last 20 years there’s only two drugs designed specifically for pediatric patients,” said Bedesky. “A lot of kids have adult types of toxic [cancer] treatments.”

Lee invited Bedesky to the lab after seeing her work as an ambassador for the St. Baldricks Foundation, which raises money for pediatric cancer research and treatments.

“She’s accomplished enough in the four weeks she’s been here that we have important pieces of data from the experiments she did,” Lee told ABC News affiliate KTRK-TV in Houston.

Bedesky was already a bit of an expert in cancer treatments after undergoing multiple rigorous chemotherapy treatments, stem cell transplants and radiation treatments after her diagnosis.

She said even though she was an expert in cancer treatments as a patient, it was different experience to see the cancer fight from a researcher perspective.

“I thought it would get redundant,” said Bedesky of working in a lab. “But every day…it was really interesting because all the data [was new.] I didn’t realize how much research and work goes into one new medicine.”

Last October, after years of treatments Bedesky was declared to show “no evidence of disease" meaning there is no sign of the deadly cancer in Bedesky's system. However, Bedesky’s cancer has a high chance of reoccurrence, so as the teen plans for the future she also remains committed to finding a cure and new treatments for her cancer.

Next year Bedesky said she hopes to go back to Lee’s lab and spent another two months working on new experiments.

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/teen-cance ... d=25213784

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Post by kenobewan » Fri Sep 05, 2014 2:00 pm

Eating a banana a day can cut risk of strokes, study finds

EATING bananas or dried apricots, which are both rich in potassium, can cut the risk of strokes and even death dramatically, according to a study. Participants in the research who daily ate more than 3.2g of potassium — the equivalent of a baked potato, a handful of dried apricots and an avocado were up to a fifth less likely to suffer strokes, and a tenth less likely to die in the period of the research.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/wo ... 7048655657

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Post by kenobewan » Tue Sep 09, 2014 8:48 am

Sleeping On Animal Fur Can Lower Asthma Risk

Animal fur might be protective against asthma and allergies, a new study finds.

The research, just presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress, examined data from 2,441 German children and found an association between sleeping on animal fur, like sheepskin rugs or throws, during their first three months and a decreased risk of asthma later in childhood, by age 10. Snoozing on fur was also associated with a lower risk of hay fever and wheezing.

Using animal fur as bedding was a common practice in Germany during the 1990s when the data was collected—about 55% of the children examined had slept on animal fur. Sheepskin is among the most popular kind, said lead study author Christina Tischer of the German Research Center for Environmental Health in an email.

The fur rugs aren’t typically treated with pesticides or strong chemical agents, she said. “We think that this animal fur might act as a reservoir for diverse kind of microbial components which [accumulate] over time within the animal fur,” she wrote.

Other studies have shown that diverse microbial environments seem to be protective against allergies, supporting the “hygiene hypothesis” that our hypersanitized lives weaken our defenses by not exposing them to enough bacteria to build proper immunity. The live kind may work, too. If you don’t have a spare bear rug in which to swaddle your infant, other studies have shown that infant exposure to pets might make infants less prone to allergies.

http://time.com/3303622/animal-fur-lowers-asthma/

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Post by kenobewan » Thu Sep 11, 2014 9:35 am

Charcoal: the strange new health trend you need to know about

The health benefits of this activated carbon-based material are more than just myth, says David Smiedt.

With all the technological advances in modern medicine, you’d think that something as old-fashioned as charcoal would be an anachronism in contemporary hospitals. But you’d be wrong. Activated charcoal – which has been treated with oxygen to open millions of pores in its atomic structure – is still the go-to substance when it comes to preventing certain poisons from being absorbed into the bloodstream.

Hopefully you’ll never have to rely on the toxin-ejecting power of charcoal in a medical situation, but however you harness its abilities, the process is the same: It’s called “adsorption”, in which one item passes into another. It involves the particles of one substance clinging to the surface of the other. This means that because charcoal isn’t digested by the body, particles of certain toxins will cling to it and exit the body with it.

But the power of charcoal doesn’t stop there. Read on for other surprising uses for this amazing material.

As a skin treatment

It sounds unlikely, but charcoal is an effective way to cleanse dirt and debris from the skin. We’re not suggesting you plunge your face into the remnants of last night’s fire. Instead, invest in a product such as L’Oréal Men Expert X-Treme Charcoal Foam. This face wash uses charcoal to mop up the excess oil and pollutants that cause breakouts. If the masculine branding puts you off, ladies, then check out the pore-clearing Origins Clear Improvement Charcoal Mask.

As a gas neutraliser

While some members of the medical industry are still undecided about its efficacy, activated charcoal is said to ease gastrointestinal problems such as diarrhea, stomach cramps, gas and indigestion. You’ll find daily charcoal supplements in most pharmacies that are marketed to absorb excess gas in the gastrointestinal tract to ease bloating, flatulence, cramping and stomach pain.

As a hair treatment

It may seem counterintuitive to spread a dark liquid over your hair, but charcoal is highly effective at removing pollutants and grease. Try it with Perfect Hair Charcoal Revitalising Shampoo and Conditioner.

As a water filter

Activated charcoal is a form of carbon and is highly effective when it comes to removing volatile organic compounds, benzene, chlorine, pesticides, radon and some metals from water, which can improve its taste and smell. Depending on your budget and dedication to the concept, you can have a company such as Filtered Water Solutions (available in Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne) install a filtration system on your tap at home for about $250. At the other end of the scale are water bottles fitted with a carbon filter to purify your tap water, such as the Brita Fill & Go. For something a bit bigger to keep in the fridge, try the Bobble Jug.

As a fridge odour-eater

You’re probably picking up a theme, namely that charcoal adsorbs pretty much anything in its vicinity and removes the offensive material. You know that moment when you open the fridge and are punched in the nostrils by a fist of pungent garlic, overly ripe cheese or a nasally offensive combination of both? This is where the Sort Of Coal Kuro Cube, can come in very handy. This block is the size of a Rubik’s cube and made from activated charcoal; not only will it keep your fridge smelling fresh, it will also absorbs ethylene gas which can cause fresh produce to spoil.

It works just as well on aromas in your car or wardrobe, and when it begins to lose its power it can easily be “recharged” simply by placing it outside in the sun for a couple of hours.

As a pregnancy supplement

Some pregnant women approaching their due date can experience a severe and annoying itch caused by pregnancy hormones that affect the level of bile in the gallbladder. Some early studies have shown that an oral supplement of activated charcoal can improve this condition, which is known as cholestasis, however, more research is needed to establish its safety.

A word of warning

Because of the adsorption process, activated charcoal supplements can interfere with the effectiveness of other medications. This is because it traps everything, not just the bad stuff. Check with your doctor before taking activated charcoal. It’s also recommended not to take it for at least an hour after you’ve had other tablets.

http://www.perthnow.com.au/lifestyle/he ... 7054239865

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Post by kenobewan » Sat Sep 13, 2014 9:39 am

Layoff letter to woman with cancer causes outcry

A woman who is battling pancreatic, liver, and ovarian cancer is also now out of a job, thanks to the oral surgeon who employed her for 12 years.

George Visnich laid off the woman in writing shortly after her devastating diagnosis, according to a letter written on his stationery that wound up posted on Facebook and then published the local newspaper this week.

“You are currently engaged in a battle against cancer that will be demanding physically, mentally, and emotionally,” reads the letter to Carol Jumper, 51.

“You will not be able to function in my office at the level required while battling for your life. Because of this, I am laying you off without pay as of August 11, 2014.

Your last paycheck will be mailed to you this Friday, August 15th, 2014. Our thoughts and prayers are with you as you fight this horrible disease. Thanks for your time at Visnich Oral Surgery. I hope your battle is swift, smooth, and successful!”

Neither Visnich nor his lawyer, Larry Kelly, returned calls seeking comment from Yahoo Health in the US today. But Kelly told the local Pennsylvania paper Beaver County Times that the meaning of the letter has been misconstrued, and that it was simply a “humanitarian” gesture to allow Jumper to collect unemployment.

Visnich wrote the letter, Kelly explained, “with the understanding that when she is feeling better, she can come back to work.”

He added that the media coverage, which has blown up this week, has been “very disappointing, in that he’s trying to help this woman and he’s made out to be a villain.”

A friend of Jumper’s, John Barkovich, who has been helping to plan fundraisers in support of her treatment costs, told Yahoo Health that the coverage has indeed gotten out of hand.

“She wants to drop the whole thing,” he said.

“Somebody posted the letter on Facebook with good intentions, to alert friends that Carol is now unemployed.”

He added that Jumper “is not worried about the doctor at all, and she made it quite clear to me that she wants [the attention] diffused.”

https://au.news.yahoo.com/world/a/24983 ... es-outcry/

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Post by kenobewan » Mon Sep 15, 2014 9:27 am

Want to prevent cancer? Eat more chickoos

The sweet and succulent chikoo or Sapota fruit, a popular ingredient for desserts, could well be the answer to halt cancer from spreading, according to a study by Indian scientists. Researchers have now shown methanolic (alcoholic) extracts of the whole fruit possess certain active phytochemicals (plant-derived compounds) that can trigger a sequence of orchestrated events in tumour cells leading to their death (a process called apoptosis).

‘There was a preliminary study which had used two of the phytochemicals isolated from Sapota fruit on cancer cell lines. Ours is the first study using whole fruit methanolic extracts which explores anti-cancer properties of the same on different cancer cell lines and on animal models. Our results indicate that inclusion of Sapota fruit in our daily diet may protect from genesis and progression of cancer,’ Sathees C. Raghavan, associate professor at the department of Biochemistry, IISc, told IANS in an email interaction.

The collaborative study was conducted by scientists at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore, and the Institute of Bioinformatics and Applied Biotechnology, Bangalore. It was published in August in Nature Publishing Group’s journal Scientific Reports. One million new cancer cases are reported in India every year and the figure is set to double in 20 years, according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer.

Out of the estimated eight million people globally who died of cancer in 2012, nearly 700,000 deaths were in India. As the disturbing figures rise on one hand, there is also, on the other end, mounting evidences of plant derived dietary substances as ‘suitable candidates for treating various types of cancers due to their broad chemical diversity.’

Raghavan explained, ‘We have tested its effect on cancer cells derived from different cancers such as leukemia, breast, ovarian and lung carcinomas. We found that it induces apoptosis in all types of cancers with varying efficiencies. We also found it slowed tumour progression in mice. Tumor containing mice that were treated with Sapota extracts lived three times longer than untreated mice.’

In fact not only did the extract ‘significantly decrease’ the tumour load in mice induced with breast cancer, in 50 percent of the mice examined, Sapota extract also led to a ‘three-fold increase in the life span compared to untreated tumour mice.’

‘However, whether Sapota has cancer preventive effects needs to be tested. There are no side effects detected yet,’ he said. Raghavan’s group included Mrinal Srivastava, Mahesh Hegde, Kishore K. Chiruvella and Souvari Bhattacharya. It worked jointly with Bibha Choudhary and Jinsha Koroth at the Institute of Bioinformatics and Applied Biotechnology. The next step, he said, is pinpointing the principal compound or compounds leading to Sapota’s anti-cancer effects.

‘The advantage lies in the fact that once the active compound or compounds are identified, they not only can be synthesized in bulk in laboratory but also can be modified further to increase the potency. Clinical trials may follow after identification and optimisation of the purified component(s),’ said Srivastava, the first author of the paper.

A tropical fruit grown and consumed extensively in several countries, including India and Mexico, Sapota (Manilkara zapota) is packed with dietary fibre, minerals, vitamins and high antioxidant properties.

Some of the other health benefits of the fruits are as follows,

1. Boosts your immunity

There are many nutrients in chickoo that can boost your immunity – namely iron, potassium, copper, Vitamin A and C, niacin, folate, etc. A strong immune system will keep diseases and infections at bay which is why you should eat a chickoo everyday. Here are some other foods to boost your immunity.

2. Aids digestion

Like most fruits and vegetables, chickoo is also good for your digestion as it contains dietary fibre. A 100g serving of chickoo contains 5g of fibre, and if you eat it everyday it is unlikely that you’ll suffer from constipation or any other digestive problem.

3. Prevents signs of ageing

Even though the Vitamin C content in chickoos is not as high as it is in guavas or oranges, it still is a rich source of the vital nutrient. Signs of ageing like wrinkles can take longer to appear if you include such fruits daily in your diet.

4. Good for your bones

Indians have weaker bones than Caucasians or Africans which makes it more important for them to eat fruits and vegetables that makes their bones stronger. Chickoo contains calcium, phosphorus and iron which help strengthen your bones. Know more health benefits of chickoos.

http://www.thehealthsite.com/news/want- ... -chickoos/

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Post by kenobewan » Wed Sep 17, 2014 9:00 am

Doctor Pleads Guilty to Cancer Treatment Fraud

A Detroit-area cancer specialist accused of giving patents unnecessary treatment has pleaded guilty to more than a dozen charges, including fraud and money laundering.

Dr. Farid Fata pleaded guilty in Detroit federal court on Tuesday, a month before he was scheduled to go on trial.

U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade says she refused to negotiate in such a "shocking" case. She tells The Associated Press she plans to seek a life sentence when Fata returns to court on Feb. 23.

Fata admitted that he ordered treatments for patients knowing they were unnecessary and then submitted bills to insurance companies and Medicare.

The 49-year-old owned Michigan Hematology Oncology, which had several offices in suburban Detroit. Those offices are now closed.

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/ ... d-25547303

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Post by kenobewan » Fri Sep 19, 2014 9:01 am

Queensland parties for a breast cancer cure

THE National Breast Cancer Foundation is calling on Queenslanders to join thousands of Australians who have registered to host a Pink Ribbon Breakfast and will be "Partying for a Cure" to help the National Breast Cancer Foundation (NBCF) find move closer towards its goal of zero deaths by 2030.

In 2013, Queensland raised $209,325.90 for breast cancer research. This year the Foundation is challenging Queensland to go one better and raise $250,000 towards NBCF's target of $1.4 million. And this year it's easier than ever.

NBCF CEO, Carole Renouf, thanked all those who have already registered in Queensland and urged others to do something they love to raise funds for lifesaving research.

"This year fun is the aim of the game and we want our hosts to let their hair down and "Party for a Cure"! It is all about having a good time with friends, family and/or colleagues and partying your own way while also raising funds to fund vital breast cancer research."

"Host a breakfast, morning tea, a bake-off at the office, bingo, a movie night. The choice is yours! And while you're busy taking care of the party rest assured NBCF is taking care of the research."

"Through research, since our inception 20 years ago, we've made significant progress in helping improve the lives of people with breast cancer. But there is still much more to do. With our hosts' help over the coming years we are committed to striving towards a cure and our goal of zero deaths by 2030," said Ms Renouf.

In 2013 Pink Ribbon hosts raised more than $1.4 million and helped to fund over 20,000 hours of research into the prevention and cure of breast cancer.

2014 registrations are now open. Visit http://www.partyforacure.org.au to register as a breakfast host.

http://www.echonews.com.au/news/queensl ... r/2391282/

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