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PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2012 5:20 am 
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Better odds of beating cancer

Two-thirds of Australians who get cancer can expect to be alive at the all-important five-year mark after diagnosis, figures show.

An Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report confirms what doctors have told many cancer patients in recent years - they have a good chance of beating the disease.

From 1982 to 2010, the five-year survival rate for cancer jumped from 47 per cent to 66 per cent, with several cancers having survival rates over 90 per cent.

Some of the biggest progress was in kidney cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and prostate cancer.

On the downside, the prognosis for some cancers, including in the larynx and brain, barely changed.

AIHW spokeswoman Anne Bech said cancers with the highest chance of survival included testicular, prostate, thyroid and melanoma, all having five-year survival rates of 90 per cent or more.

Pancreatic cancer and mesothelioma had the worst rates with five-year survivals less than 10 per cent.

Women generally had slightly higher survival rates across all cancers at 67 per cent compared with 65 per cent for men.

Younger people were more likely to beat cancer than older people and lower socioeconomic groups fared worse.

For the first time, the national figures show that once people survived five years after diagnosis - known as conditional survival - their prospects of living five more years were more than 90 per cent.

That has contributed to more than 775,000 Australians being alive today after surviving cancer, mostly of the breast, prostate and bowel and melanoma.

Television cameraman Paul Brown was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma seven years ago at age 34 after finding a lump in his neck while shaving.

The cancer, which affects lymphocyte cells that help the immune system, is one of those with improved survival odds with 70 per cent of male patients alive five years after diagnosis.

Mr Brown says he was shocked when told he had cancer and turned to the Cancer Council of WA for support.

"I wasn't unwell and there were no symptoms but the next minute I was being told I had the big C," he said. "I couldn't believe it."

After surgery to remove the tumour, he had a year of chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

Now 41, he has been clear of the cancer since then but says it always preys on his mind.

"Every now and then I get that nagging feeling but I'm right as rain so I guess you just have to get on with life," Mr Brown said.

http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/-/wa ... ng-cancer/


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2012 5:16 am 
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Cancer survival rates improving in Australia

New research shows cancer survival rates have been improving in Australia.

The latest report on cancer from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare shows the five-year survival rate from all cancers increased from 47 per cent to 66 per cent from 1987 to 2010.

However, the institute's Anne Bech says the improvement was mixed for individual cancers.

"So the cancers that had the largest survival gains over time were prostate cancer, kidney cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma," she said.

"But we didn't see much improvement in mesothelioma, pancreatic cancer and lung cancer."

Women recorded higher survival rates after a cancer diagnosis than men at 67 per cent, compared to 65 per cent.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-09-20/c ... ng/4270940


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2012 5:11 am 
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Survival rates show cancer no longer a death sentence

TWO out of three cancer patients are now alive five years after they were diagnosed, thanks to a 40 per cent increase in survival rates.

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare data to be released today shows the five-year survival rate from all cancers increased from 47 per cent in 1982-87 to 66 per cent in 2006-10.

Cancers with the most significant survival gains were kidney cancer and non-Hodgkins lymphoma, with five-year survival up from 47 per cent to 72 per cent.

Prostate cancer survival rose from 58 per cent to 92 per cent in the five years.

Cancers with the highest survival rates include testicular cancer, lip cancer, prostate cancer, thyroid cancer and melanoma, which all had five-year survival rates of more than 90 per cent.

Pancreatic cancer and mesothelioma had the lowest survival, with fewer than 10 per cent alive five years after diagnosis.

Four cancers showed no significant changes in survival: cancer of the lip, cancer of the larynx, cancer of the brain and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

The survival rate for bowel cancer - the second most common cancer in Australia - rose from 48 to 66 per cent. Deaths from bowel cancer dropped by 43 per cent to 18 per 100,000.

Breast cancer, the most common cancer among Australian women, had a 27 per cent fall in its death rate as a result of early detection and improved treatment. The five-year survival rate rose from 72 per cent to 89 per cent and was highest in women aged 40-69 (about 92 per cent).

The institute said: "With one in two Australians developing cancer and one in five dying from it before age 85, cancer has a major impact on individuals, families and the healthcare system."

It said it was important to note that survival estimates were based on the outcomes of groups of people with a diverse mix of cancer and other characteristics.

"As such, they provide an indication of the average survival experience. They do not reflect an individual's chance of surviving," it said.

Between 1982 and 2007, the incidence of all cancers combined rose 27 per cent to 490 new cases per 100,000 population - but mortality fell 16 per cent during the same period to 176 deaths per 100,000.

Survival from cancer was highest among people under 40 (five-year survival of 86 per cent) and was lowest for those aged 80 and over (43 per cent).

Women (67 per cent) had a slightly better survival rate from cancer than men (65 per cent).

The report shows cancer survival rates were slightly lower for people in remote and regional areas against those in major cities.

Those people who survived five years after a cancer diagnosis had a 90 per cent chance of living for a further five years, the figures show.

Almost 775,000 Australians have a history of cancer and one in five of those aged over 80 have been treated for the disease.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/nation ... 6477591031


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