How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

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kenobewan
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Re: How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

Post by kenobewan » Sun Oct 12, 2014 2:35 pm

Miracle Heathfield brain tumour sufferer celebrates double achievement

A FORMER Heathfield schoolboy who defied the odds of surviving a brain tumour is celebrating a double achievement – graduating from university and helping fund a new tissue register.

Charlie Boutwood, from Horam, was diagnosed with a Medulloblastoma malignant brain tumour as a baby.

He underwent an emergency eight-hour operation, in which surgeons were only able to remove 3/4 of the tumour before enduring a year of intense chemotherapy followed by six weeks of radiotherapy.

Against the odds he made a remarkable recovery and he has now graduated from university and is working full-time in London.

He said: “I have defied the odds and exceeded my own expectations as well as those of others. I feel I am a living inspiration of what can happen. So many stories you hear are about brain tumour patients who have not survived, but mine is a celebration of life.

"This year I graduated from the Manchester Metropolitan University with a 2:1 in Geography and Tourism Management. For anyone graduating it is a big deal, but for our family it was yet another huge milestone we thought I might never reach.

“I can remember sitting in our old Volvo, as a toddler, behind the front passenger seat with my hair coming out in chunks in my hand. I think I’d had my first dose of chemotherapy. The smell of hospitals also takes me back, making me feel comforted and homely. Because I was treated in London’s Guy’s Hospital for several years, it became a home from home.

“When I was at school I used to have a hard time learning and became frustrated that I couldn’t tell the time or work with numbers very well. My hand would sweat when I was writing because I was concentrating so hard! Like many brain tumour patients we put this down to having had brain surgery, which typically leaves scars, both physically and mentally. However, now I have graduated with a good degree and I still can’t quite believe it.”

Following his son’s diagnosis in 1993, Nigel Boutwood founded the charity Charlie’s Challenge to raise awareness of brain tumours.

Because of the money he has raised it has helped establish the first national networked brain tumour tissue archive.

The Brain Tumour Archive Network that will unlock thousands of previously hard to access brain tumour samples for researchers throughout the UK.

Charlie added: “My dad has raised hundreds of thousands of pounds to increase research into brain tumours, he sees it as a celebration of survival and now I plan to take an active role too. I see myself in an advantageous position of being able to tell a positive story and feel it would be selfish not to do what I can.

“I know Dad feels that we were very lucky, I was one of the first to have the treatment I did, but many children who were being treated alongside me were not so lucky. He has said it was the most horrific time of his life, and that at times the odds felt stacked against us, but Dad is a real optimist and said failure was never an option. Both he and my mother were warned that because of the location of the tumour near my central nervous system I might never walk, talk, move or swallow again but I defied the odds.

“As I get older I am becoming more and more involved in advocacy and lobbying work, spreading the word that more needs to be done to secure more research into brain tumours.

“I am going to use my good luck to forge on pushing the brain tumour cause. I expect I will always be looking for opportunities to promote the cause and help bring us to the day when a cure is found for all brain tumours.”

http://www.courier.co.uk/Miracle-Heathf ... story.html

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Re: How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

Post by kenobewan » Tue Oct 14, 2014 1:42 pm

Lung Cancer Can Hide in the Body for 20 Years

According to a new research, lung cancer hides in the body, unbeknownst to the person or doctors until it finally strikes. This deadly disease can hide in your body for over 20 years before it expands said the new research.

This finding spells the need for new ways to detect the disease before it takes on full force.

Above 40,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with lung cancer every year. Although advancement in treatment is making the chances of survival slightly better, still, fewer than 10 percent of diagnosed patients actually survive.

"Survival from lung cancer remains devastatingly low with many new targeted treatments making a limited impact on the disease," study author Charles Swanton said in a statement. "By understanding how it develops we've opened up the disease's evolutionary rule book in the hope that we can start to predict its next steps."

The research was done by Cancer Research UK and the Rosetrees Trust. They studied lung cancer in seven patients that included smokers, ex-smokers and even those that never smoke. What they found was that after genetic mistakes that naturally caused the cancer, it could also stay hidden for years, triggering a rapid growth of the disease when it actually decided to strike.

As the disease strengthens its influence over the body, a surge occurs inside the genetic faults that appear in separate parts of the tumor. Every part of the tumor is unique so the disease in each section evolves differently. This is why treating the cancer proves so difficult. Even though you can attack one area of the disease, the other spots can persist and continue to thrive.

"This fascinating research highlights the need to find better ways to detect lung cancer earlier when it's still following just one evolutionary path," said Professor Nic Jones, Cancer Research UK's chief scientist. "If we can nip the disease in the bud and treat it before it has started travelling down different evolutionary routes we could make a real difference in helping more people survive the disease."

http://www.designntrend.com/articles/21 ... -years.htm

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Re: How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

Post by kenobewan » Thu Oct 16, 2014 1:03 pm

Salmonella food poisoning cases increasing despite education campaigns: ANU study

The number of Salmonella food contamination cases in Australia is increasing despite more education campaigns on food safety.

While foodborne illnesses dropped overall by 17 per cent in the decade to 2010, the two leading causes of hospitalisation, Salmonella and Campylobacter, increased by 24 per cent and 13 per cent respectively.

Salmonella bacteria can be carried in undercooked chicken or eggs, while Campylobacter is usually found in raw or undercooked poultry meat and raw milk.

Researchers at the Australian National University (ANU) say there were about 16 million cases of gastroenteritis each year, and four million of those are caused by food contamination.

It means Australians suffer a food contamination illness once every five years.

Last year more than 160 people in Canberra suffered salmonella poisoning caused by raw eggs in the mayonnaise at a Dickson restaurant.

Associate Professor Martyn Kirk from the ANU's National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health said outbreaks like that are preventable.

"There certainly has been ongoing concern about rising rates of salmonella over the last decade," he said.

"We've been seeing increasing numbers of outbreaks that have been investigated by health departments, so that is quite concerning because food safety and health departments have made a lot of efforts in the past 15 years to try to improve the safety of the food supply."

Associate Professor Kirk said the food safety messages do not appear to be getting through.

"I think there's still a lot of work to be done not only at the food service sector, so restaurants and caterers, but also with consumers," he said.

"More importantly at the primary production sector, so preventing contamination of eggs that are being used for sale, or chicken meat that is sold."

https://au.news.yahoo.com/a/25270053/sa ... source=wan

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Re: How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

Post by kenobewan » Sat Oct 18, 2014 9:33 am

Ebola crisis: How one man and his ambulances offer hope to Liberia’s victims

In a country where public services have virtually collapsed, where about a dozen ambulances are normally available for four million people, saving an Ebola patient often comes down to this: phoning a barrel-chested politician with a taste for Hummers.

Saah Joseph didn’t intend to become the lifeline for victims of the worst Ebola outbreak in history. In February, weeks before the disease hit, the legislator imported six shiny ambulances from central California. His goal was modest – to serve his constituents suffering everyday ailments, and to burnish his reputation in the process.

But now, his personal mobile number is announced on the radio and exchanged by friends in crisis. It is pasted on his six ambulances, near his smiling face. He estimates that he has transported 3,000 patients since April, at least half with Ebola.

Mr Joseph, 38, who has a seat in the lower house of parliament, has created one of the most vital services in this disease-stricken land: his own emergency medical team. He has six more ambulances on the way from California.

The reliance on his fleet is a sign of how poorly prepared Liberians are as the epidemic grows. The country has only 4,901 body bags;it needs 84,841 in the next six months, according to the Health Ministry.

“The government never considered health a priority. I had people begging me for ambulances, and I found a way to get them,” Mr Joseph said.

Aside from Mr Joseph’s fleet, there are only about a dozen private and government ambulances in all of Liberia, and most of them are just cars or trucks with makeshift sirens and lights. Many Ebola victims take taxis to the hospital – posing a huge risk of infection for the vehicles’ next passengers.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world ... 02146.html

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Re: How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

Post by kenobewan » Mon Oct 20, 2014 8:28 am

Confronting ads target obesity rates in Canberra

A new television campaign targeting obesity in the ACT has kicked off with a series of confronting advertisements.

The LiveLighter project is backed by the Heart Foundation and the ACT Government.

Heart Foundation ACT chief executive officer Tony Stubbs said 63 per cent of adults in Canberra were overweight or obese.

"In fact seven out of 10 males are overweight or obese," he said.

"It is a major problem and the way we're communicating to people around this issue and the way we're supporting people is clearly not working.

"The issue is large and what we're doing is not working, so we need to do something that's actually going to start the conversation with people."

Mr Stubbs said the ads would bring people face-to-face with the health impacts of "toxic fat".

"There are good and bad fats, but there's really strong evidence now that fat around your waist - or toxic fat - actually releases chemicals which are doing you harm," he said.

"We also know from research that if you do have fat around your waist you're at a higher risk of getting heart disease, diabetes and cancer in the future."

Consultant cardiologist at Canberra Hospital Walter Abhayaratna said helping Canberrans reach a healthy weight was a priority.

"Obesity is a significant public health challenge because it is one of the leading causes of preventable death and disease in our community," he said.

"People know it's important to eat a balanced diet and be active, but many of us struggle to make healthy choices.

"The reality is that small, easy changes really do make a positive difference to your health."

The LiveLighter campaign is part of the wider ACT Government Healthy Weight Initiative which also includes consultation with doctors and schools.

https://au.news.yahoo.com/a/25297234/co ... source=wan

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Re: How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

Post by kenobewan » Wed Oct 22, 2014 8:43 am

Nurse in Ebola scare to leave isolation

A Cairns nurse who sparked an Ebola scare when she developed a fever after returning from west Africa will go back to normal life today after three weeks in isolation.

Australian Red Cross aid worker Sue Ellen Kovack was admitted to a Cairns hospital this month after coming down with a low-grade fever soon after returning from treating victims in Sierra Leone.

The 57-year-old twice tested negative for the virus before she was released from hospital on October 13 to complete the 21-day incubation period at home.

Ms Kovack has pleaded for greater action to fight the disease, which has killed thousands in west Africa since the start of the year.

http://www.skynews.com.au/news/local/br ... ation.html

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Re: How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

Post by kenobewan » Fri Oct 24, 2014 8:57 am

Everybody Panic! Capitalism Is Killing You With Toxic Receipt Paper! Is Nothing Sacred!?

That’s it. Bolt your doors. Board up your windows. Huddle alone in the dark, and for Chrissakes, don’t touch anything. Everything is trying to kill you. Everything. Even the receipt paper from that donut you just bought. Even huddling alone in the dark, because you’ll probably starve if you don’t ruin the whole thing by going outside or moving or something! Life carries a significant risk of death.

But back to the donut and the receipt paper for a minute: Thermal printing paper like the kind used in many cash registers is covered in a print-developing chemical called BPA (Bisphenol A), which is a chemical that shows up significantly in the bodies of the human population. Donuts are delicious things you shove into your face-hole until your stomach hurts. (No? Just me?) When you put the two together, the results are… not great, according to a new study published on PLOS ONE.

The team from the University of Missouri found that the evil receipt paper is colluding with other products you thought were your friends like hand sanitizer and sunblock to increase your skin’s absorption of BPA by up to 100 times—enough to significantly raise its levels in your blood after handling thermal paper. Add that to the additional BPA which is then ingested orally when it transfers from your hands to your food, like our friend the donut or whatever it is you’re into, and let’s just say you’ve got another great reason to do all your shopping online.

The study notes that previously, it was assumed almost all BPA exposure came from the packaging of food and products, but thermal paper may play a larger role in light of the ease of absorption when combined with common skincare items. Luckily for you (unless all my readers are children, which I guess would make sense), BPA is widely regarded as only potentially dangerous to children and isn’t likely to pose harm to adults in concentrations typically found in humans. Just don’t go too crazy on any shopping sprees, and you should be fine.

Or if you’re really concerned, you could just stop buying things, or stop cleaning your hands and protecting them from skin cancer—two totally doable solutions. And remember: Everything is trying to kill you, so you should probably not worry about this one too much.

http://www.themarysue.com/capitalism-is ... ipt-paper/

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Re: How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

Post by kenobewan » Sun Oct 26, 2014 12:19 pm

Teachings of Spam lead to the everlasting sandwich

The latest food fad, if you can call something with serious scientific backing a fad, is an attempt to create "fossil" foods through the spread of Spam principles.

Leaving aside its taste, the canned meat known as Spam is unique for its long shelf life. Its manufacturer told Time magazine that the expiry date of two years on a tin of Spam is only there only to help consumers keep the product moving. Its real shelf life is 12 to 15 years, maybe more.

For canned food, we can thank Napoleon and his prize of 12,000 francs to the person who could come up with a way of reliably feeding his army. But scientists are looking beyond the heat sterilisation, or freezing, or salting, for better methods of food preservation. One is high pressure processing which pulverises bacteria to smithereens and is already used instead of chemicals for some lunch meats.

HPP as it is known in the trade promises to add to the filling choices (currently limited to pepperoni or chicken) for the "indestructible" sandwich created by the US Department of Defense. It lasts three to five years without refrigeration, using moisture-absorbing ingredients and wrappings which minimise exposure to decay-precipitating oxygen.

Marvellous for space travel, you'd think. But consider the potential for stabilising world food supplies between cycles of feast and famine. And long-lasting foods are relied on when electricity and commerce fail due to disasters from war to weather, earthquake to explosion. Food waste from decay and rot is a problem the world over. We may be hungry for next-gen Spam, the indestructible sandwich, sooner than we think.

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/comment ... 1b496.html

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Re: How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

Post by kenobewan » Tue Oct 28, 2014 3:47 pm

Next Time Someone Says Fast Food Isn't A Real Job, Remember This

We've heard it once. We've heard it twice. And we're sure to hear it again: Fast food jobs aren't "real jobs." They're for teenagers who need extra cash or for young workers who need a "launching pad" to a better job down the line.

These sort of assumptions get thrown around all the time. "Why can't you get a real job?" a Montana judge asked a 21-year-old fast food worker convicted of vandalism in June, implying that a different job would help him pay off his restitution quicker.

But in reality, fast food jobs are a very real segment of our economy. And for many real moms, dads and other working people, they're a very real source of income too.

So the next time someone says fast food jobs aren't "real," please remember some of these points:

For years, the fast food industry has created jobs at a faster rate than the rest of the economy.

Since the recession ended, we've seen a troublingly uneven recovery, in which many of the middle-income jobs lost from 2008 to 2010 have been replaced by low-wage jobs. And fast food jobs are a large reason why, outpacing the country's overall job growth.

“Fast food is driving the bulk of the job growth at the low end -- the job gains there are absolutely phenomenal,” Michael Evangelist, a policy analyst at the National Employment Law Project, an advocacy group, told The New York Times in April.

According to an NELP report, 44 percent of jobs added in the past four years have been low-wage jobs that pay workers around $10 an hour.

The majority of fast food workers aren't teenagers, but real adults with real responsibilities.

Opponents of raising wages for fast food workers often say that those jobs are mostly for teenagers living with their parents who are just looking for some extra spending money. But that's not true anymore.

Increasingly, fast food jobs are being filled by adults who need full-time work. According to an analysis of government data by the Center for Economic and Policy Research, 70 percent of fast-food workers are 20 or older these days.

Real adults, with real families.

CEPR's analysis also found that more than 1 in 4 fast food workers have a child. For what it's worth, it costs about $245,000 to raise a kid.

So the fast food industry's low wages end up having a very real impact on taxpayers.

Because fast food pay is low, workers often have to rely on public assistance programs like food stamps and Medicaid to get by, which ends up costing American taxpayers billions of dollars every year.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/2 ... 28404.html

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Re: How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

Post by kenobewan » Thu Oct 30, 2014 8:55 am

Taco Bell, fast-food rivals push toward mobile ordering

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Taco Bell on Tuesday debuted its mobile app that allows customers to place an order, customise their food, access special offers and pay from their phones.

The move from the chain owned by Yum Brands Inc comes as restaurant chains, including McDonald's Corp and, seek ways to use mobile technology to drum up more business and speed up service times.

"We believe mobile ordering and payment is the biggest innovation since the drive-thru," Taco Bell President Brian Niccol said in a statement.

https://au.news.yahoo.com/technology/a/ ... -ordering/

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Re: How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

Post by kenobewan » Sat Nov 01, 2014 1:06 pm

Brain cancer claims 18 locals every year

FRIGHTENING statistics have put the spotlight on brain cancer mortality rates in the region, with an average of 18 people dying from the disease every year.

Figures released from the Queensland Cancer Council as part of Brain Tumour Awareness Week, which finished today, showed 23 Wide Bay-Burnett residents were diagnosed annually on average.

The research found 226 people had been diagnosed with brain tumours and 181 people had died from the cancer in the past 10 years in the region.

Brain surgeon David Walker, from Briz Brain and Spine, said brain tumours were the most devastating of all cancers.

He said most malignant brain tumours were incurable because cancerous cells spread throughout the brain, making them difficult to treat.

Even if surgeons removed 99.9% of the tumour from the brain, there would always be the remaining 0.1% somewhere else.

And Professor Walker said there was a high chance it would grow again, and sometimes aggressively.

"The big thing people don't realise is how common brain tumours are," he said.

"While they're not as common as breast or lung cancer, they are much more devastating in a lot of ways.

"Most cancers are curable. But brain tumours are in children and young adults … and when you get a brain tumour you can't work again."

Prof Walker said treating brain cancer was complicated.

"If it was possible to be really aggressive with the surgery and chemotherapy and radiation, you could probably kill those cells off. But you can't because you'd cause devastating side effects for the person.

"You can't just cut out whatever part of the brain you like. You can't just blast it with radiation."

He said it was about time something was done about brain cancer because the situation was not improving.

"Outcomes are not much better than they were 20 years ago," he said. "There needs to be more bold research. We need new novel, experimental treatments. We're not getting anywhere in the current ways of treatment."

Cancer Council Queensland spokeswoman Katie Clift about only 25% of people diagnosed with a malignant brain tumour survived at least five years.

"The burden placed on patients and carers following a brain tumour diagnosis can be significant," she said.

http://www.frasercoastchronicle.com.au/ ... r/2439209/

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Re: How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

Post by kenobewan » Mon Nov 03, 2014 12:54 pm

Cure for Alzheimer’s Disease?

Scientists have discovered that it is a protein that causes Alzheimer’s disease. For many years, it was thought to be a plaque that caused this disease. What exactly is Alzheimer’s disease? It is the most common form of dementia, worsening as it progresses into the later stages and eventually results in death. It is most commonly diagnosed in people aged 65 and above but has also rare occurrences in young people. Researchers putting two and two together, say that they may have found the cure – a cancer drug named Nilotinib – used to combat leukemia, may finally be the cure to Alzheimer’s Disease.

As mentioned earlier, the researchers for Alzheimer’s disease say it cannot be plaque but instead, it is a protein that wipes out a person’s memory, messes with their behavior and thoughts by annihilating brain cells. The reason for the breakthrough discovery was because each plaque contained amyloid-beta protein and traces of this protein, called “tau”, are found in the brains of people with this disease. However, the scientists in Georgetown University Medical Center say that they could have possibly discovered evidence that the tau is the responsible for the neuron malfunction while for many years, almost a hundred years, it was believed that plaques were the key culprit in this disease, says senior investigator Charbel E-H Moussa.

What does this all mean to the layperson? Simply put, this clears the mystery of why people with unnatural amounts of plaque in their brains never ever have dementia. Secondly, this also means that since the true cause has been found, a new solution can be found as well. The true cause being tau, and the new solution being anti-tau, report the researchers in Molecular Neurodegeneration, a medical journal.

How does tau work, and what exactly is it? Inside each neuron cell, tau plays a structural support – allowing the cells to get rid of accumulated toxic proteins. If the tau proteins malfunction, either as a result of aging or from unnatural genes, the neurons are unable to dispose of these toxins by themselves. This revelation to the scientists has lifted a perpetual mystery – the toxins remaining inside the brain cells cause these cells to die, instead of the long thought belief that it was the plaque building outside the neurons that killed it.

The solution, the scientists say, could be a pill called Nilotinib. This drug is primary used for combatting leukemia in adult sufferers, but now the scientists are looking at Nilotinib to be the new weapon against Alzheimer’s Disease – to clear out the neuro-toxins to balance out the effect of the malfunctioning tau. The other advantage of Nilotinib is that it can also reduce the plaques that accumulate on the brain cells, reports Moussa. He hopes to begin tests to prove his theory within the next few weeks.

This new discovery with regards to the tau being the true cause of Alzheimer’s Disease may result in possible screenings that could show signs of the disease at an earlier stage – therefore the patients will know much earlier than before if they will suffer from this disease in the future. Moussa explains that the current evidence implies that tau modification happens much earlier than amyloid plaques building up, and since every Alzheimer’s patient has had tau modifications, this will be a more reliable indicator of the disease and other types of dementia as well, rather than tests for amyloid beta plaques.

The hope of this new finding is that early medical screenings, together with nilotinib, could significantly reduce the speed of tau malfunction and amyloid beta buildup, preventing more people from suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease or other forms of dementia.

http://www.betawired.com/cure-for-alzhe ... e/1412186/

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Re: How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

Post by kenobewan » Wed Nov 05, 2014 11:38 am

How red meat can harm the heart - research

Red meat can harm the heart because of the way one of its nutrients is broken down by gut bacteria, research has shown.

By digesting the meat compound, L-carnitine, the bugs generate metabolites that promote hardening and narrowing of the arteries.

Scientists had previously identified one of the danger metabolites, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO).

The latest research has uncovered a second, gamma-butyrobetaine, produced by the microbes at a rate 1000 times higher than TMAO formation.

Both contribute to atherosclerosis, the build up of hard fat and mineral deposits on the walls of arteries that can lead to heart attacks and strokes.

However, the mouse studies show two different types of gut bacteria are responsible for metabolising gamma-butyrobetaine and TMAO from L-carnitine.

The research suggests potential new drug targets for treating atherosclerosis, for example by suppressing bacterial enzymes or affecting the kind of bugs that populate the gut.

Lead scientist Dr Stanley Hazen, from the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, US, said: "The findings identify the pathways and participants involved more clearly, and help identify targets for therapies for interventions to block or prevent heart disease development.

"While this is into the future, the present studies may help us to develop an intervention that allows one to 'have their steak and eat it too' with less concern for developing heart disease."

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/new ... d=11353576

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Re: How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

Post by kenobewan » Fri Nov 07, 2014 12:36 pm

Canberra sneezes through worst hay fever season in years

Canberra is on track to break a record of the longest string of days with high and extreme pollen levels and hay fever sufferers be warned - the worst could be yet to come.

Professor Simon Haberle, one of the creators of a mobile app which has been tracking forecasting pollen levels in Canberra since October 1, said so far this hay fever season had been unusually severe and November was the peak time for pollen.

"We had some quite strong days in October and they seem to be persisting," the head of the Australian National University's Department of Archaeology and Natural History said.

"We've had at least 10 days of high to extreme pollen in the atmosphere… and that's quite unusual."

The string of high pollen days began on Sunday October 26 Professor Haberle said, coinciding with a spike in emergency department presentations for asthma at Canberra Hospital – where 15 people sought treatment compared to a more average day of just four.

Pollen counts in Canberra every day since have remained in the high and extreme categories.

If, as predicted, Friday and Saturday are also high pollen days it will break the Canberra record - 12 days - since data was first collected five years ago, Professor Haberle said.

October's spike in asthma cases at the hospital was blamed on thunderstorms in Canberra.

Professor Haberle said "thunderstorm asthma" was a well-known phenomenon in Melbourne and Wagga Wagga when weather conditions enhanced the activity of pollen in the atmosphere.

"It actually changes the character of the grass pollen in particular and the way it interacts in your airways," he said.

"It kind of explodes; it's like popping candy going off in your nose and eyes.

"It makes hay fever and asthma conditions even worse in a storm."

Currently there is only anecdotal evidence of the phenomenon in Canberra, but Professor Haberle said researchers were closely monitoring pollen counts during thunderstorms and cross referencing the data with asthma admissions to Canberra's hospitals.

A wet winter and the lush grass it produced around Canberra, coupled with a dry spell and strong north-west winds has been blamed for the capital's high pollen days.

Professor Haberle said the researchers looked at weather patterns and forecasts and the pollen counts of previous days to predict pollen counts for up to a week ahead.

If predictions of a hotter, drier Canberra climate were correct, he said the hay fever season was expected to begin earlier and last longer.

So far the Canberra Pollen app has been downloaded more than 2000 times since it launched in September and more than 3000 people have rated their hay fever and asthma symptoms for the researchers as part of the "citizen science" project.

"On our extreme [pollen] days we had the indication that people we're really feeling the effects," Professor Haberle said.

"There's quite a strong correlation between grass pollen and people's symptoms."

Professor Haberle said the research would hopefully improve predictions of pollen in the atmosphere so the community could take steps to treat their symptoms on bad days.

He said the researchers hoped for government support to continue the service next season and collect data from all capital cities.

Although different people are sensitive to different types of pollen, Professor Haberle said rye grass was the chief offender and the focus of the pollen count project.

But he said the researchers were also monitoring other pollen types including European tree pollen and Patterson's Curse which could also affect sufferers.

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-new ... 1h3xk.html

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Re: How to avoid processed food (Opinion)

Post by kenobewan » Sun Nov 09, 2014 12:49 pm

Leading anti-euthanasia advocate Nicholas Tonti-Filippini dies

One of the country's leaders speakers against voluntary euthanasia, Nicholas Tonti-Filippini has died after a long battle with a chronic auto-immune disease.

Professor Tonti-Filippini was diagnosed with a terminal illness at the age of 20 but lived until the age of 56. He died surrounded by family.

Two years ago, the bioethicist discussed his terminal illness saying he was suffering from renal failure, advanced ischaemic heart disease and rheumatoid auto-immune disease.

He refused to make himself a candidate for a transplant and was a staunch in his opposition to voluntary euthanasia. He died of pancreatic complication in his final hours. He died surrounded by his wife Mary Walsh and three of his four children. His fourth having recently journeyed overseas, the Catholic Leader said.

"We as a family are so blessed to have had Nicholas in our lives and are so proud of all he has achieved in faithful service to others, both personally and professionally," the family said in a statement.

"We would like to thank the many who have offered prayers and support over the years of his illness and trust Christ will bring him into the light of his presence."

Professor Tonti-Filippini was associate dean and head of bioethics at the John Paul II Institute for Marriage and Family in Melbourne. Two years ago he told the Catholic Weekly about his terminal illness and his views.

"Euthanasia would be a disaster for people like me," Professor Tonti-Filippini said.

"I'm dependent on dialysis … I'm well advanced with a terminal condition. If euthanasia was allowed it would put pressure on people in my situation to take that option.

"So anybody who was terminally ill – anybody who was suffering – they would be under a kind of pressure because the doctors would have to tell them that this was an option, so it would undermine the whole relationship between them and their doctor.

"At the moment, the doctors and nurses I see encourage me to keep going with the dialysis.

"But if they happen to turn around and say that at this stage of your life you could opt for euthanasia, it would completely undermine the relationship.

"It would also undermine relationships with my family and others."

Brisbane Archbishop Mark Coleridge, who got to know Professor Tonti-Filippini while living in Melbourne, told the Catholic Leader the bioethicist's Christian beliefs about euthanasia were "never stronger than in his last years when he was dealing with the illness that claimed his life".

Pope Benedict XVI made Professor Tonti-Filippini a Knight Commander of the Order of St Gregory the Great in 2009. He was also a Knight in Obedience of the Sovereign Military Order of the Knights of St John of Jerusalem, Rhodes and Malta.

He published four volumes on bioethics and was due to publish a fifth.

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/victori ... 1j0yy.html

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